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Site News

Uptime in Tux Machines and Upcoming Relocation

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Tux Machines is down! Yes, We Know.
A heads-up, folks!

SOME time soon the physical server of Tux Machines will need to be moved from one datacentre to another (the current datacentre is shutting down for good). Nothing will change, except perhaps some IP addresses, and duration of downtime is expected to be a couple of hours. In that period of time the IRC network will also be down (same physical machine), but it will be back online at around the same time as the site.

In terms of uptime, we haven't done too badly. 126 days since the last downtime and the issues we recently mentioned (due to a sort of DDOS) have been mostly resolved for weeks. That started around February and stopped at the start of this month. It might resume. Hopefully not...

So, in summary, if some time this coming month there's a long downtime, then it is likely intentional and scheduled. Given sufficient leeway or advance notice, we might even give a heads-up before the server starts its journey. The downside with such things may be, if you post a message about a site going offline and immediately (or shortly) after that the site does go offline, who's actually going to see that message? So we forewarn readers as early as today.

Why Tuxmachines.org Refuses Connections Sometimes

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Junk request; Tuxmachines.org; /dev/null; Better!
Ongoing issue

EVER since February of this year we've had a hard time pushing back against a torrent of problematic requests, seemingly crafted to cause trouble. We wrote some programs a few months ago to automate mitigations, but occasionally the server still slows down or even hangs up on some legitimate connections/requests.

It would be nice to have an optimal, long-term solution, but we do not have that yet. At the moment it is a compromise.

Improving Our Commitment to Tux Machines Readers

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Tux Machines is now self-hosting IRC

Tux Machines IRC
Tux Machines is probably one of the largest (in terms of # of pages) GNU/Linux sites out there. But the IRC channel is relatively new (compared to the site).

THE 'IRC wars' of May (and to some degree June as well) left us in a precarious situation and over at Techrights we have set up our own IRC network. In June we set up a #tuxmachines channel in this new network. It has a two-way bridge set up with Freenode, so either network would be valid for following our updates.

We've accordingly updated the IRC page and the corresponding archives. We welcome people to join us in IRC. It's a substitute to RSS feeds or social (control) media. It's now hosted by us, so from a privacy perspective the readers are far better off. It's definitely an upgrade, a well overdue one.

30,000 Comments

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Humble beginnings
We turn 17.5 years before Christmas

THE 30,000th comment was recently posted in this site, but that in itself does not say much. More than half a decade ago we had to stop new account sign-ups due to an epidemic of SPAM. It wasn't manageable anymore due to increasing volumes. So leaving comments became harder, too.

Nowadays, as a result, most comments are basically just updates made to submissions of ours, adding related links to existing news updates. We consider that to be a good/better use of the comments feature. It's not prone to abuse. It also helps in keeping the site concise and tidy (less repetition).

It's summer here in England (like the rest of the northern hemisphere), so we try to enjoy the outdoors a bit more often (a certain pandemic notwithstanding). Above is a highland cow. We met one (and her calf) a few weeks ago in the countryside.

We've Just Turned 17

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17Th Year Anniversary Let's celebrate have fun and be merry

Today Tux Machines turns 17. Seventeen years of promoting freedom and privacy in the technical world. Our devotion will carry on along with the community and supporters. Tux Machines is here to stay; today, tomorrow, and in the coming years. Let's celebrate Tux Machines. Cheers!

Video: Editing Work in Tux Machines

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Video download link

THE site is turning 17 very soon. We thought it would be worthwhile belatedly explaining how it works and how editorial policies evolved to better serve readers and lurkers.

Tux Machines Turning 17 Shortly

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Video download link

THIS site will turn 17 in a couple of weeks (screenshot below). The video above explains how we got here, who's responsible for it, and where we move from here. Wink

Tux Machines whoisThe video is very informal (totally unscripted, unedited, improvised), but it's also the first time we publish such a video in this site (or the blog).

We wish to thank all those who have supported or merely read us for many years. Spread the word. We're always eager to reach audiences that don't know much about GNU/Linux and may consider switching to it.

In retrospect, as this is composed after making the above video, it's worth noting that the antiX-19.4 page could not be found because of the dash (or hyphen). We rarely miss important news and we're typically very quick to cover/mention important stories.

Big Traffic in Tux Machines Ahead of 17th Anniversary

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Big Big Traffic
Credit: Penguin rendering by Mogz

THE Tux Machines site turns 17 in a couple of months and traffic has never been better. This past week it was on average 100,000 hits per day and later this month we will have posted the 150,000th node.

Sorting out the news isn't a simple task, but with experience it gets a lot easier and we're glad to be a leading syndicator in that space.

Migrating TuxMachines to a Bigger Server

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We are in the process of moving the TuxMachines Web site to a better server with more capacity and better hardware. There may be temporarily odd behaviour on the site (if data is accessed which is out of date).

Monitoring Tux Machines With Apachetop, Nmon and Htop

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Monitoring Tux Machines

Summary: A little glimpse at how we monitor this site for DDOS attacks and general performance, especially now that DDOS attacks have already become pervasive and routine (Apachetop helps identity attack patterns and visual, colourful alerts are triggered in Nmon and Htop)

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More in Tux Machines

Can You Run Linux Without a Desktop Environment?

While modern Linux systems have attractive desktop interfaces, you may be wondering whether you can use Linux without them. The straightforward answer is "yes." What Is a Desktop Environment? While the desktop environments on Windows and macOS are tightly integrated and built into the system, on Linux, desktop environments like GNOME, KDE, and Xfce are just collections of programs that you can install in addition to the base operating system. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Oracle v. Google: What the verdict means for open source | InfoWorld

    The decade-long legal battle between two of the world’s largest tech companies has finally come to an end. The result was a victory for the open-source software community. In case you need a refresher on the Oracle v. Google case, Oracle sued Google in 2010 for copyright infringement on Google’s use of Oracle’s Java API in its Android smartphone operating system. The District Court ruled in favor of Google, but that decision was later reversed on appeal. The case ultimately landed in the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled six to two in Google’s favor this April.

  • Jupyter Labs Desktop App: What Is It & Do We Need It?
  • Apple's M1 MacBook screens are stunning – stunningly fragile and defective, that is, lawsuits allege

    Aggrieved MacBook owners in two separate lawsuits claim Apple's latest laptops with its M1 chips have defective screens that break easily and malfunction. The complaints, both filed on Wednesday in a federal district court in San Jose, California, are each seeking class certification in the hope that the law firms involved will get a judicial blessing to represent the presumed large group of affected customers and, if victorious, to share any settlement. Each of the filings contends Apple's 2020-2021 MacBook line – consisting of the M1-based MacBook Air and M1-based 13" MacBook Pro – have screens that frequently fail. They say Apple knew about the alleged defect or should have known, based on its own extensive internal testing, reports from technicians, and feedback from customers.

  • A Burger King where the only Whopper is the BSOD font

    Bork goes back to its roots today, with a screen of purest blue showing its unwanted face outside a US Burger King branch. At least it makes a change from McDonald's, very much the DNS of Bork when it comes to failures. In this instance, it looks like it is the exterior signage, normally showing a slideshow of tasty (and frequently greasy) treats, that has succumbed to the curse of Microsoft.

  • RISC-V Launches the Open Hardware Diversity Alliance

    RISC-V International, a global open hardware standards organization, announced the launch of the Open Hardware Diversity Alliance. The global Alliance, created by CHIPS Alliance, OpenPOWER Foundation, RISC-V, and Western Digital, will develop and provide learning and networking programs, mentorship opportunities and inclusive environments across the expansive ecosystem of open hardware. The Alliance will be focused on supporting professional advancement and encouraging equal participation for women and underrepresented individuals in the open hardware community.

  • ASUS Tinker Board 2S: High-performance Raspberry Pi alternative

    The long-awaited ASUS Tinker Board 2S is out. And there's a lot packed into the 85 x 56 mm Raspberry Pi form factor. At the heart of the Tinker Board 2S is a Rockchip RK3399 chipset that combines two ARM Cortex-A72 cores, four ARM Cortex-A53 cores, and an ARM Mali-T860 MP4 GPU. The board comes with 2GB or 4GB of LPDDR4 RAM, and 16 GB of eMMC flash.

  • Value Stream Management: Bringing Lean Manufacturing Techniques To IBM i Development - IT Jungle [Ed: Another example of grotesque conflict of interest by IBM. This ‘article’ is about IBM and is also sponsored by IBM.]
  • Open Mainframe Project Announces Continued Growth in Community Contributions and Adoption as Mainframes Accelerate Innovation in Enterprise Hybrid Technology [Ed: "Linux" Foundation is openwashing IBM to make a monopoly seem like "community"]

    The Open Mainframe Project kicked off the 2nd annual Open Mainframe Summit today with news of record growth in contributions - with more than 105.31 Million Lines of Code written and over 9,600 commits submitted by Open Mainframe Project communities so far this year. This is 100 percent more code than last year with an increased number of active participants in the 20 project and working groups. These numbers will only increase as Open Mainframe continues to be the cornerstone of governance and innovation for modernizing the mainframe and its path to IoT, Cloud and Edge Computing.

today's howtos

  • How to use wall command in linux - Unixcop

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  • Any Port in a Storm: Ports and Security, Part 1

    When IT and Security professionals talk about port numbers, we’re referring to the TCP and UDP port numbers a service is running on that are waiting to accept connections. But what exactly is a port?

  • Book Review: Data Science at the Command Line By Jeroen Janssens

    Data Science at the Command Line: Obtain, Scrub, Explore, and Model Data with Unix Power Tools written by Jeroen Janssens is the second edition of the series “Data Science at the Command Line”. This book demonstrates how the flexibility of the command line can help you become a more efficient and productive data scientist. You will learn how to combine small yet powerful command-line tools to quickly obtain, scrub, explore, and model your data. To get you started, author Jeroen Janssens provides a Docker image packed with over 80 tools–useful whether you work with Windows, macOS, or Linux.

  • How to Take a Typing Test on Linux With tt

    In the modern era of technology, typing has become one of the most common activities for a lot of professions. Learning to type faster with accuracy can help you get more things done in the same amount of time. However, touch typing is not a skill that you can master overnight. It takes regular practice and testing to improve your speed and accuracy gradually. While there are a lot of websites that help you achieve this, all you essentially need on Linux is a terminal. Let's see how.

  • FIX: Google Chrome doesn’t work on Kali linux
  • How to install OpenToonz on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install OpenToonz on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below. If you have any questions, please contact us via a YouTube comment and we would be happy to assist you!

Security and DRM Leftovers