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Uptime in Tux Machines and Upcoming Relocation

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Tux Machines is down! Yes, We Know.
A heads-up, folks!

SOME time soon the physical server of Tux Machines will need to be moved from one datacentre to another (the current datacentre is shutting down for good). Nothing will change, except perhaps some IP addresses, and duration of downtime is expected to be a couple of hours. In that period of time the IRC network will also be down (same physical machine), but it will be back online at around the same time as the site.

In terms of uptime, we haven't done too badly. 126 days since the last downtime and the issues we recently mentioned (due to a sort of DDOS) have been mostly resolved for weeks. That started around February and stopped at the start of this month. It might resume. Hopefully not...

So, in summary, if some time this coming month there's a long downtime, then it is likely intentional and scheduled. Given sufficient leeway or advance notice, we might even give a heads-up before the server starts its journey. The downside with such things may be, if you post a message about a site going offline and immediately (or shortly) after that the site does go offline, who's actually going to see that message? So we forewarn readers as early as today.

Why Tuxmachines.org Refuses Connections Sometimes

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Junk request; Tuxmachines.org; /dev/null; Better!
Ongoing issue

EVER since February of this year we've had a hard time pushing back against a torrent of problematic requests, seemingly crafted to cause trouble. We wrote some programs a few months ago to automate mitigations, but occasionally the server still slows down or even hangs up on some legitimate connections/requests.

It would be nice to have an optimal, long-term solution, but we do not have that yet. At the moment it is a compromise.

Improving Our Commitment to Tux Machines Readers

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Tux Machines is now self-hosting IRC

Tux Machines IRC
Tux Machines is probably one of the largest (in terms of # of pages) GNU/Linux sites out there. But the IRC channel is relatively new (compared to the site).

THE 'IRC wars' of May (and to some degree June as well) left us in a precarious situation and over at Techrights we have set up our own IRC network. In June we set up a #tuxmachines channel in this new network. It has a two-way bridge set up with Freenode, so either network would be valid for following our updates.

We've accordingly updated the IRC page and the corresponding archives. We welcome people to join us in IRC. It's a substitute to RSS feeds or social (control) media. It's now hosted by us, so from a privacy perspective the readers are far better off. It's definitely an upgrade, a well overdue one.

30,000 Comments

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Humble beginnings
We turn 17.5 years before Christmas

THE 30,000th comment was recently posted in this site, but that in itself does not say much. More than half a decade ago we had to stop new account sign-ups due to an epidemic of SPAM. It wasn't manageable anymore due to increasing volumes. So leaving comments became harder, too.

Nowadays, as a result, most comments are basically just updates made to submissions of ours, adding related links to existing news updates. We consider that to be a good/better use of the comments feature. It's not prone to abuse. It also helps in keeping the site concise and tidy (less repetition).

It's summer here in England (like the rest of the northern hemisphere), so we try to enjoy the outdoors a bit more often (a certain pandemic notwithstanding). Above is a highland cow. We met one (and her calf) a few weeks ago in the countryside.

We've Just Turned 17

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17Th Year Anniversary Let's celebrate have fun and be merry

Today Tux Machines turns 17. Seventeen years of promoting freedom and privacy in the technical world. Our devotion will carry on along with the community and supporters. Tux Machines is here to stay; today, tomorrow, and in the coming years. Let's celebrate Tux Machines. Cheers!

Video: Editing Work in Tux Machines

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Video download link

THE site is turning 17 very soon. We thought it would be worthwhile belatedly explaining how it works and how editorial policies evolved to better serve readers and lurkers.

Tux Machines Turning 17 Shortly

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Video download link

THIS site will turn 17 in a couple of weeks (screenshot below). The video above explains how we got here, who's responsible for it, and where we move from here. Wink

Tux Machines whoisThe video is very informal (totally unscripted, unedited, improvised), but it's also the first time we publish such a video in this site (or the blog).

We wish to thank all those who have supported or merely read us for many years. Spread the word. We're always eager to reach audiences that don't know much about GNU/Linux and may consider switching to it.

In retrospect, as this is composed after making the above video, it's worth noting that the antiX-19.4 page could not be found because of the dash (or hyphen). We rarely miss important news and we're typically very quick to cover/mention important stories.

Big Traffic in Tux Machines Ahead of 17th Anniversary

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Big Big Traffic
Credit: Penguin rendering by Mogz

THE Tux Machines site turns 17 in a couple of months and traffic has never been better. This past week it was on average 100,000 hits per day and later this month we will have posted the 150,000th node.

Sorting out the news isn't a simple task, but with experience it gets a lot easier and we're glad to be a leading syndicator in that space.

Migrating TuxMachines to a Bigger Server

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We are in the process of moving the TuxMachines Web site to a better server with more capacity and better hardware. There may be temporarily odd behaviour on the site (if data is accessed which is out of date).

Monitoring Tux Machines With Apachetop, Nmon and Htop

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Monitoring Tux Machines

Summary: A little glimpse at how we monitor this site for DDOS attacks and general performance, especially now that DDOS attacks have already become pervasive and routine (Apachetop helps identity attack patterns and visual, colourful alerts are triggered in Nmon and Htop)

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

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  • Run Nexus Repository Behind Nginx Reverse Proxy - kifarunix.com

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  • How to use the Buttercup password manager on Linux

    Buttercup is an advanced, open-source password vault. It encrypts your passwords with AES 256bit cryptography to keep them safe. If you’re tired of proprietary password solutions on Linux and want something open-source, you’ll love this guide. In this tutorial, we’ll go over how to install Buttercup on Linux. We’ll also show you how to set up your password vault and generate a secure password. Note: Buttercup is also available for iOS and Android in their respective app stores.

  • How to use YouTube Music on the Linux desktop

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  • How to use the AuthPass password manager on Linux

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  • How to install Zoom on Elementary OS 6.0 - Invidious

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  • How to Install and Configure RabbitMQ on Debian 11

    RabbitMQ is a free, open-source and one of the most popular message broker software. It supports multiple messaging protocols and uses plugins to communicate with popular messaging solutions like MQTT. A message broker is an application that stores messages for an application. Whenever an application wants to send data to another application, the app publishes the message onto the message broker. RabbitMQ can be deployed in distributed configurations to meet high-scale, high-availability requirements. In this post, we will show you how to install and configure RabbitMQ message broker software on Debian 11.

  • How to Create an Amazon Machine Image (AMI) and use it on AWS

    An Amazon Machine Image (AMI) provides the information required to launch an instance. An EC2 instance can not be launched without an AMI. We can create as many instances as we want from a single AMI when we need multiple instances with the same configuration. To create an instance we can use readily available AMI or we can create our own AMI. To create a custom AMI we need to first launch an instance using one of the available AMIs, make the required configuration on the instance and then use that instance to create an AMI. Instances launched from this new custom AMI include the customizations that we made when we created the AMI. We can create AMIs from either running or stopped instances. Once we create an AMI, we can either keep it private so that only we can use it, or we can share it with a specified list of AWS accounts. We can also make our custom AMI public so that the community can use it.

New bash programming articles

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  • Bash Arithmetic Operation

    Using bash aliases, Ubuntu users can easily create shortcut commands of the large commands those are used frequently. Bash aliases not only make the task easier but also save the time of the users. The user can declare alias temporary or permanently. How to use bash aliases is explained in this article.

  • How to use arrays in Bash

    When you want to use multiple data using a single variable in any programming language, you have to use array variables. The list of data can be assigned and used using an array variable. Bash is a weakly typed language that does not require defining any data type for declaring the variable. Array declaration in bash is a little bit different from other standard programming languages. Two types of the array can be declared in bash. Numeric array and associative array. If the index of an array is numeric, then it is called a numeric array, and if the index of an array is a string, it is called an associative array. How you can declare a numeric array, associative array, and iterate elements of the array using for loop are described with examples in this tutorial.

  • Bash Head and Tail Command

    Many types of commands are available in bash to show the content of a file. Most commonly used commands are ‘cat’, ‘more’, ‘less’, ‘head’ and ‘tail‘ commands. To read the entire file, ‘cat’, ‘more’, and ‘less‘ commands are used. But when the specific part of the file is required to read then ‘head‘ and ‘tail‘ commands are used to do that task. ‘head‘ command is used to read the file from the beginning and the ‘tail‘ command is used to read the file from the ending. How you can use ‘head‘ and ‘tail‘ commands with different options to read the particular portion of a file is shown in this tutorial. You can use any existing file or create any new file to test the functions of ‘head‘ and ‘tail‘ commands. Create two text files named products.txt and employee.txt with the following content to show the use of ‘head‘ and ‘tail‘ commands.

  • Bash Range

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  • Bash Script User Input

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  • BASH while loop examples

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Mark Text is a Minimal Open Source Markdown Editor

Markdown is developers’ favorite text writing language. It is so clean, simple and minimal and allows developers to focus only on the writing process itself, rather than the writing syntax or other trivial issues. That’s why, it is essential that you use a minimal, distraction-free and clean markdown editor to write or edit your markdown files, so that you can find comfort in your long writing sessions (E.g for documentation or similar). Luckily, many open source markdown editors exist for all types of users and their use cases. Today we’ll be seeing Mark Text; a minimal open source application for writing markdown documents. Read more

Debian's Antoine Beaupré: The Neo-Colonial Internet

Sergey Brin and Larry Page are the Lewis and Clark of our generation. Just like the latter were sent by Jefferson (the same) to declare sovereignty over the entire US west coast, Google declared sovereignty over all human knowledge, with its mission statement "to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful". (It should be noted that Page somewhat questioned that mission but only because it was not ambitious enough, Google having "outgrown" it.) The Lewis and Clark expedition, just like Google, had a scientific pretext, because that is what you do to colonize a world, presumably. Yet both men were military and had to receive scientific training before they left. The Corps of Discovery was made up of a few dozen enlisted men and a dozen civilians, including York an African American slave owned by Clark and sold after the expedition, with his final fate lost in history. And just like Lewis and Clark, Google has a strong military component. For example, Google Earth was not originally built at Google but is the acquisition of a company called Keyhole which had ties with the CIA. Those ties were brought inside Google during the acquisition. Google's increasing investment inside the military-industrial complex eventually led Google to workers organizing a revolt although it is currently unclear to me how much Google is involved in the military apparatus. Other companies, obviously, do not have such reserve, with Microsoft, Amazon, and plenty of others happily bidding on military contracts all the time. [...] The Internet is, if not neo-colonial, plain colonial. The US colonies had cotton fields and slaves, we have disposable cell phones and Foxconn workers. Canada has its cultural genocide, Facebook has his own genocides in Ethiopia, Myanmar, and mob violence in India. Apple is at least implicitly accepting the Uyghur genocide. And just like the slaves of the colony, those atrocities are what makes the empire run. Read more