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PCLinuxOS KDE 2011.6 post installation tips.

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Linux

1. Maximize the KDE Panel
Right Click on the panel and select Unlock Widgets
Click on the Cashew on the right side of the panel
Click on More Settings
Click on Maximize Panel
Click on the red X to close

BIOS Flash update under linux.

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Linux

I figured it was time to do a BIOS update on one of my main Linux boxes. The MSI NF 980-G65 AMD motherboard came with an AMI BIOS dated September 2009. This MSI motherboard is based on the NVidia NForce 980a chipset, and has built-in NVidia Geforce 8300 video (which I do not use).

Powering up this system has always been a little flaky, requiring a couple of reset-button presses before it would boot into Linux (it would hang at the BIOS splash screen). After boot-up, the system always ran great.

Alright, so on to the BIOS update. MSI has the live update online program which requires, of course, Microsoft Windows, and the Internet Explorer browser. Well, I don't have these on this system, and don't want to put them on it.

In the AMI BIOS setup program, I see the M-Flash option. I try this, but can't get it to work. Some research on the Internet indicates that it's very likely you'll wreck your BIOS using M-Flash anyway, so that's out.

Linux Libraries

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Linux

I wish Linux developers who build libraries for Linux would make their new versions backward compatible with the old version. Also wish they would stop changing their library majors. It is a big pain in the ass to have to rebuild source rpm/deb packages simply to relink a package because of a change with the library major. Every time a developer changes their library major, God kills a kitten.

Angry Birds for Chrome Browser

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Linux

Just noticed that Angry Birds is now online at http://chrome.angrybirds.com

Mageia 1 Alpha2 -- A Status Report

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Linux

On September 18, 2010, in response to Mandriva's liquidation of its “Edge-IT” subsidiary and the attendant layoff of a substantial share of its developers, a group consisting of former Mandriva developers and Mandriva community contributers announced their intention to form a non-profit organization and release a fork of Mandriva Linux called Mageia Linux.

How is the Mageia 1 release shaping up? This status report takes a look at Mageia Linux 1 Alpha 2 release (updated daily), from a KDE-user perspective.

PCLinuxOS on the BBC

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Linux

I was happy to see PCLinuxOS get promoted on the BBC. Below is a link to the video posted on their website. I was told it also appeared on TV so yaaa!

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/click_online/9394434.stm

Best Hard Drives?

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Linux

I think my hard drive is going out. It's been a while since I bought one. I used to really like Maxtor, but I think they were bought out. By who? I bought a Western Digital a couple years ago and it didn't last too long. So, what are your opinions of the best, as in sturdy, dependable, and long lasting, hard drives today?

Damn you Kubuntu

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Linux

I've been chugging along happily using Sabayon for about six months or so, but once again, the urge to update to the latest and greatest bit me on my asterisks.

Enlightenment packages updated post beta 3

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Linux

I upgraded the Enlightenment packages post beta 3 for PCLinuxOS which fixes an ordering issue that was present in the beta 3 library release. itask-ng is still acting a bit funky when trying to drag and drop but ordering through the setup menu works good. This update will appear shortly in the Synaptic Package Manager for those who have Enlightenment installed.

Tex

PCLinuxOS 2010.12 BitTorrent Links available

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Linux

I finally got around to getting some torrent links setup for the PCLinuxOS 2010.12 isos. They are currently available at the following locations.

http://torrent.ibiblio.org/doc/191/torrents

and

http://linuxtracker.org/index.php?page=torrents&category=262

Happy Holidays!
Tex

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