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HOW TO DO MASS ENROLLING OF YUBIKEY WITH LINOTP

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Linux

While you may have your Ubuntu install locked down with Full disk encryption incase you loose the laptop, UFW locking down the network with a firewall, there is no point if you have a poor password. Dual factor authentication using One Time Passwords may be an option for you, if they are this great howtoforge article might point you in the right direction.

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Half-Life

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Linux

I've been playing Half-Life recently, something to which I've looked forward for quite some time. I did get it playing under Wine years ago, but I thought I only got a little ways. I'm stuck In the Rails right now, but I remember this level.

Getting Squid3 on Debian 6.x to work with Active Directory, Security Groups and Websense

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Linux

I’ve had a need to get a local squid proxy to perform local filtering based on AD Security groups because it’s not something websense can do. I found this wonderful howtofoge guide online and Used it to setup the base system. This howto is a work in progress as the next stage is to get it working with DansGuardian or SquidGuard.

Prerequisites
Client Internet Explorer Browsers need to have “Enable Integrated Windows Authentication” ticked in Internet Options :: Advanced settings as well as Proxy Auto detection enabled – google these if not sure. All modern web browsers will support proxy auto detection. Firefox and Chrome also support Windows Authentication.

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Enabling Dual Factor Authentication on Linux SSH logins..

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Linux

A couple of weeks ago I wrote a post on using a Chromebook to develop on a cloud platform. Its based on a Digital Ocean remote server and like most people who wish to attach to the command line interface on a remote server I use SSH. It’s an encrypted connection over the network/internet from end to end. However being a cloud server I was wondering if it was possible to secure this a little bit more?

A chat with a friend on the way into work provided me with a solution.

The solution is Two Factor authentication a system beased on a simple premise, something you know (the SSH password in this case) and something you have (your mobile phone in this case, but it could be a secure token) which will deliver a random number.

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Ubuntu 13.04 raring to go on Acer C7 Chromebook

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Linux

Most of the guides you will see using this utility mine included cover how to get Ubuntu 12.04 the LTS version working, however there is also scope within the command line to get the latest and greatest up and running. specifically the -r switch. Issuing the following command will provide you with a bare bones Ubuntu 13.04 install

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Using a Chromebook to develop in the cloud…

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Linux

Being a few months in with my Acer C7 Chromebook as my only laptop i’ve very pleased with what it does, I do have the Crouton Ubuntu chroot installed and upgraded the device to 16Gb of Ram, however there is one core thing I miss with this setup. VMWare/Virtualbox. I find i’m often building virtual machines, usually Ubuntu to test bsh scripts or build LAMP Environments to test some PHP out with. That isn’t something i’m able to do even on the CHROOT Ubuntu environment.

All however is not lost, and i’ve found a way to get round this..

Read my ChromeOS virtual soluton

Desktop era

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Linux

Will the believers in the desktops ever stop making this year is the year of Linux on the desktop...

There’s something Ubuntu needs to do if the phone is going to work..

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Linux

They say a week in politics is a long time, well a year in the mobile phone industry is an eternity and what huge changes the industry is going through. A year ago the roost was ruled by Apple and Google, 3G was the fastest we can go and handsets were finding a stock size at 4.5″.. The world however of the mobile device is now a very different place and very much in a positive state of change..

What does the Ubuntu Phone need to succeed?

Casual Programming and Linux Screen-Recorders

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Linux

After being retired (for four years) from teaching high school Computer Science, I decided to get back into programming again. I once taught a beginning programming class using the Ruby language, and I thought that would be a good way to get back into programming. So, I decided I needed a “Ruby refresher”, and I wanted to learn more about that language than I taught in the classroom.

Maybe it's time to think about LTSP?

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Linux

With austerity being the watchword of our times being able to get as much out of that IT hardware you have is as important as ever, more so when the industry is in shift at an OS level and maybe the hardware you have isn’t quite up to the task of Windows 8?

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More in Tux Machines

KDE Leftovers

  • Qt Creator 4.2.1 released
    We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.2.1. This is a pure bugfix release, and takes care of various important bugs.
  • KTextEditor depends on KSyntaxHighlighting
    Recently, the KSyntaxHighlighting framework was added to the KDE Frameworks 5.29 release. And starting with KDE Frameworks 5.29, KTextEditor depends on KSyntaxHighlighting. This also means that KTextEditor now queries KSyntaxHighlighting for available xml highlighting files.
  • [Krita] Interview with Adam
    Good day. My name is Adam and I am a 26-year-old person who is trying to learn how to draw…
  • [Krita] We’re doing a User Survey!
    While we’re still working on Vector, Text and Python Scripting, we’ve already decided: This year, we want to spend on stabilizing and polishing Krita!

More of today's howtos

Linux and Graphics

ASUS "Tinker Board"

  • Asus takes on Raspberry Pi with 4K-capable Tinker Board
    Tech giant Asus is taking on the Raspberry Pi with its own DIY-friendly single-board computer that's said to offer 4K video playback and 24-bit audio support in exchange for a hefty £55 price tag.
  • ASUS "Tinker Board" Powered By Rockchip ARM SoC, Supports Debian
    Making its rounds this morning as a "Raspberry Pi competitor" is the Tinker Board from ASUS. The Tinker Board is ASUS' take on an ARM SBC similar to what's already offered by a plethora of vendors. The Tinker Board features a quad-core 1.8GHz ARM Cortex-A17 processor with ARM Mali T764 graphics and there is 2GB of DDR3 memory.