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Linux

Casual Programming and Linux Screen-Recorders

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Linux

After being retired (for four years) from teaching high school Computer Science, I decided to get back into programming again. I once taught a beginning programming class using the Ruby language, and I thought that would be a good way to get back into programming. So, I decided I needed a “Ruby refresher”, and I wanted to learn more about that language than I taught in the classroom.

Maybe it's time to think about LTSP?

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Linux

With austerity being the watchword of our times being able to get as much out of that IT hardware you have is as important as ever, more so when the industry is in shift at an OS level and maybe the hardware you have isn’t quite up to the task of Windows 8?

Ubuntu Phone, Good idea?

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Linux

In a bold move today Ubuntu have announced plans to move forward with an Ubuntu Phone which it is touting the interface is the difference here. This is a big statement in a marketplace which has been owned by Apple and Google for the last 3 to 4 years.

Building your own cloud using OwnCloud on Ubuntu.

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Linux

Unless you’ve been under a rock or are the type of Luddite who thinks the pen and paper is modern hi tech, you cannot fail to have heard about the most miss used expression on the Internet, the cloud. It’s a buzzword which every ill equipped marketing goon has latched his crayon’s onto and will mention in every presentation ever.

Put simply the cloud is the image used when tech people wanted to display the Internet outside their own network, this turned into a location firstly where data could be stored and more recently where “Big Data” is stored.. Honestly I have no idea who comes up with this stuff.

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Ubuntu 12.04 the Macbook Pro Post Install

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Linux

While this post states its the post install for the Macbook Pro it will cover any 64bit Nvidia Ubuntu 12.10 post install...

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Ubuntu 12.10 on the Macbook Pro

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Linux

With Mountain Lion not cutting the mustard, it was time to see what Ubuntu 12.10 offers the Mac Community so i've just installed the MAC Spin of the 64bit Ubuntu's latest offering.

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How To Edit Grub Menu or Software On Ubuntu / Linux / Fedora Grub Customizer

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Linux

Now,
For Ubuntu
Open Terminal and type
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:danielrichter2007/grub-customizer
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install grub-customizer

(Fedora 32-bit)
wget -O grub-customizer-2.5.7-i686.rpm http://goo.gl/vE2Ev
sudo yum install grub-customizer-2.5.7-i686.rpm

This is where mobile technology is headed, it’s great.. Especially for "Nix

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Linux

We know the mobile phone is where it is at, we also know the cloud is the glue which binds all our devices, what if this didn’t have to be the case? The cloud is great when you are tethered to your Wifi or a mobile signal, great if you work in a big city with lots of Wifi hotspots or mobile coverage. Not so good when the office blocks access to it because of security risks, or you live in a 3G blackspot.

Personal Computing on the fly

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Linux

The cloud. It's the talk of the town and has been growing for awhile now.

Why Ubuntu, not Ubuntu Linux will be the future of next Gen OS’s

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Linux

Ubuntu Linke Android is based on a Linux Kernel, it has a Linux command line, it runs Linux applications however if Ubuntu is to become a serious third contender in the Operating space it needs to drop the word Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux firewalls: What you need to know about iptables and firewalld

A firewall is a set of rules. When a data packet moves into or out of a protected network space, its contents (in particular, information about its origin, target, and the protocol it plans to use) are tested against the firewall rules to see if it should be allowed through. Here’s a simple example... Read more

Mozilla: Firefox GCC/LLVM Clang Dilemma, September 2018 CA Communication and CfP

  • Fedora Firefox – GCC/CLANG dilemma
    After reading Mike’s blog post about official Mozilla Firefox switch to LLVM Clang, I was wondering if we should also use that setup for official Fedora Firefox binaries. The numbers look strong but as Honza Hubicka mentioned, Mozilla uses pretty ancient GCC6 to create binaries and it’s not very fair to compare it with up-to date LLVM Clang 6. Also if I’m reading the mozilla bug correctly the PGO/LTO is not yet enabled for Linux, only plain optimized builds are used for now…which means the transition at Mozilla is not so far than I expected.
  • September 2018 CA Communication
    Mozilla has sent a CA Communication to inform Certification Authorities (CAs) who have root certificates included in Mozilla’s program about current events relevant to their membership in our program and to remind them of upcoming deadlines. This CA Communication has been emailed to the Primary Point of Contact (POC) and an email alias for each CA in Mozilla’s program, and they have been asked to respond to the following 7 action items:
  • Emily Dunham: CFP tricks 1
    Some strategies I’ve recommended in the past for dealing with this include looking at the conference’s marketing materials to imagine who they would interest, and examining the abstracts of past years’ talks.

today's howtos

Security: Quantum Computing and Cryptography, Time to Rebuild Alpine Linux Docker Container

  • Quantum Computing and Cryptography
    Quantum computing is a new way of computing -- one that could allow humankind to perform computations that are simply impossible using today's computing technologies. It allows for very fast searching, something that would break some of the encryption algorithms we use today. And it allows us to easily factor large numbers, something that would break the RSA cryptosystem for any key length. This is why cryptographers are hard at work designing and analyzing "quantum-resistant" public-key algorithms. Currently, quantum computing is too nascent for cryptographers to be sure of what is secure and what isn't. But even assuming aliens have developed the technology to its full potential, quantum computing doesn't spell the end of the world for cryptography. Symmetric cryptography is easy to make quantum-resistant, and we're working on quantum-resistant public-key algorithms. If public-key cryptography ends up being a temporary anomaly based on our mathematical knowledge and computational ability, we'll still survive. And if some inconceivable alien technology can break all of cryptography, we still can have secrecy based on information theory -- albeit with significant loss of capability. At its core, cryptography relies on the mathematical quirk that some things are easier to do than to undo. Just as it's easier to smash a plate than to glue all the pieces back together, it's much easier to multiply two prime numbers together to obtain one large number than it is to factor that large number back into two prime numbers. Asymmetries of this kind -- one-way functions and trap-door one-way functions -- underlie all of cryptography.
  • This New CSS Attack Restarts iPhones & Freezes Macs
  • Time to Rebuild Alpine Linux Docker Containers After Package Manager Patch
  • GrrCon 2018 Augusta15 Automation and Open Source Turning the Tide on Attackers John Grigg