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2 cool features to expect in KDE 4.9

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Linux

The list of planned features is very long and includes many UX and UI additions, improvements and bugfixes, but the two that I am looking forward to the most are KLook and StackFolder, two features already available by default on ROSA Marathon 2012 and also in ROSA Desktop 2012 beta.

How to change the height and position of the KDE panel

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Linux

To change the properties of the panel, which by default is on the bottom edge of the desktop, you need to access the Panel Tool Box widget located on the extreme right edge of the panel. Depending on the distribution you are using, the panel could be locked or unlocked.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/06/05/how-to-change-the-height-and-position-of-the-kde-panel/

Mageia 2 review

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Linux

The other desktop environments and window managers supported by Mageia 2 are E17, LXDE, WindowMaker and IceWM. Aside from the Live CD installation images for KDE and GNOME 3, users are offered dual-architecture CD installation images, DVD, and network-based CD ISO installation images for 32- and 64-bit architectures.

MATE vs Cinnamon

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Linux

The aim of this article is not to present a point-by-point comparison of the two desktop environments, but to present a general overview, so a new user has a top-level idea of what they are.

Linux Can Take Over If It Sticks To What It Does Best. Appliances

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Linux

Everyone is always so fixated on desktop Linux and why it can't get decent numbers in the desktop market.

The answer is obvious. You can't come late into the game when someone has a huge installed base and expect to win based on free over easy.

Install Cinnamon 1.4 on Fedora 17

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Linux

For those set of users, suitable alternatives are: Modify the interface with extensions, as I showed how to do here, or install Cinnamon desktop, a project from the developers of Linux Mint. Cinnamon appeals to many because it offers the familiar look and feel of the type of desktop environment they are used to.

Fedora 17 KDE and GNOME 3 preview

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Linux

Specialized Spins for Security, Scientific-KDE, Design-suite, SoaS, Games, Electronic-lab and Robotics were also released. It is very unlikely that I will review these, but there will be reviews of the main edition and KDE Spin. While the reviews are still being baked, here are a few screen shots from test installations of the main edition and KDE Spin for your viewing pleasure.

How to get back that friendly desktop look on Mageia 2 GNOME 3

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Linux

From my perspective, the worst culprit is GNOME 3. And though I have often criticised the default GNOME 3 interface, with a little bit of tweaking here and there, I have been able to get it to a point where I can actually use it for my daily computing tasks. It is not perfect, but much better than the default configuration.

Linux Mint 13 MATE/Cinnamon preview

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Linux

There is Linux Mint 13 MATE, which features MATE, a desktop environment forked from GNOME 2, and Linux Mint 13 Cinnamon, which features Cinnamon, a desktop environment built atop GNOME 3. So, Linux Mint joins a growing list of Linux distributions that do not ship an edition running the GNOME 3 desktop in its default state.

ROSA Marathon 2012 review

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Linux

There is ROSA Marathon and ROSA Desktop. According to the Release Notes, ROSA Marathon is designed for enterprise, SMB and SOHO users who do not need bleeding-edge applications and technologies. ROSA Desktop is for personal use, and the 2012 edition is still being baked, slated for release sometime at the end of the year.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • NPR Open Sources "Lunchbox" Tools for Cloud and Social Graphics
    Whether you do some blogging, work as a journalist or just make use of popular social media and cloud computing tools, you probably regularly need to acquire and customize publishable graphics. The good people at NPR are out to make that job easier.
  • 6 top continuous integration tools
    Continuous integration (CI) is an integral part of an agile software development setup. Sprint after sprint, teams strive to "not break the build" while delivering incremental features. But when developers focus completely on adding features, code errors can sometimes creep in and render the software unusable. To stop such errors from being integrated into the software configuration management (SCM), a CI server is the gatekeeper that helps keep a tab on code quality. Even if the code is integrated to SCM, a CI server can quickly tell you what went wrong. In this post, let's take a look at six open source CI server tools that you can use in your agile setup.
  • Now SourceForge For Sale
    After a run of bad publicity and floundering to retain and attract users, parent company DHI today announced SourceForge.net and Slashdot.org are for sale. DHi said the reason was due to a refocus on their employment services. Elsewhere, CoreOS CEO Alex Polvi spoke with InfoWorld.com's Paul Krill about cloud strategies and OpenSource.com wants to know what is your favorite desktop environment. It's been a rough year for SourceForge. SourceForge began last Summer by asking users to change their passwords for now reason at all before finally admitting the database had been hacked. Then they were found to be taking over software sources that appeared to have been abandoned and adding spyware into bundled installers. Later projects began fleeing in droves and SourceForge began a campaign to soften their image by reaching out and communicating more with "the community." Today their owner announced the immediate availability of SourceForge.net and as an added bonus, if you dial before midnight tonight, you'll get Slashdot.org too. The announcement said the sale was due to "not successfully [leveraging] the Slashdot user base to further Dice's digital recruitment business." No asking price was given, but DHi paid $20 million for the sites in 2012.
  • Nóirín Plunkett: Remembering Them
    Today I learned of some of the worst kind of news, my friend and a valuable contributor to the great open source community Nóirín Plunkett passed away. They (this is their preferred pronoun per their twitter profile) was well regarded in the open source community for contributions.
  • Getting physical: A $10 device to clone RFID access keys on the go
    A $10 device capable of skimming access cards on the go is soon to be released into the open-source community. Radio-frequency identification (RFID) cards are a quick and convenient way for businesses to track as and when their employees are on site, and also act as a way to both restrict and permit access to particular corporate locations. While RFID technology can help secure enterprise offices in this way, the ease in which these access controls can be hacked has hit the spotlight in the form of a tiny device which costs only $10 to make.
  • OpenDaylight Beryllium Takes Shape
    Colin Dixon, Technical Steering Committee Chair (TSC) at the OpenDaylight Project and a Principal Engineer at Brocade, said that the thing he's most proud of during the Lithium release cycle was that it landed on time, without too much pain. He commented that the maturity of the overall project has grown over the last two years, making a stable release cadence possible.

Coverity Report Finds Open Source Code Quality Beats Commercial Code

Synopsys has announced the release of its annual Coverity Scan Open Source Report, which is widely followed. The 2014 report details the analysis of nearly 10 billion lines of source code through the Coverity Scan service and commercial usage of the Synopsys Testing Platform. For the report, the company analyzed code from more than 2,500 open source C/C++ projects as well as an anonymous sample of commercial projects in 2014. Additionally, the report highlights results from several popular, open source Java and C# projects that have joined the Coverity Scan service since March 2013. Here are findings. Read more Also: Coverity Scan Open Source Report Shows Commercial Code Is More Compliant to Security Standards than Open Source Code

DragonFlyBSD Has Full-Acceleration Now Working For Intel Broadwell Graphics

Francois Tigeot's latest effort on porting the Intel i915 DRM code from the Linux kernel to DragonFlyBSD has paid off in the form of full acceleration for Broadwell "Gen8" HD/Iris Graphics. Tigeot issued a call for testing a few days back of an update to the i915 DRM code that would position the DragonFlyBSD's code at the stage of the Linux 3.16 kernel. This updated code should fix some issues that previously caused X.Org Server crashes, correct outstanding bugs, improve performance for all GPU generations, and provide much improved support for Broadwell graphics. He noted that the Broadwell GPUs on DragonFlyBSD should now be fully accelerated with this new code. Read more

Elive 2.6.8 beta released

Beta versions are not so optimized as the Stable ones due to debug flags and developer profiles, you can encounter errors and incomplete things, if you want a more polished system try the Stable version instead. Read more