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Linux

All hail the easy to use!

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Linux

I've run Linux since before the turn of the century. I know Linux. I love the commandline. But after 10 years of fiddling, I've come to realize one significant thing.

Linux Failed to Satisfy Old PC Users

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Linux

Some months ago, i wrote article “3 Reasons why we shouldn’t use Linux“, after a lot of comments on the article in the favor of Linux, I thought i should also try Linux. So i downloaded Fedora 13.

From Karmic to Lucid: Distribution Update Screenshots

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Linux

In line with its newbie-friendly tradition of providing a way to do everything via a graphical user interface, Ubuntu provides a way to do a distribution upgrade by clicking a button at the top of the Update Manager. Since version 10.04 was released on April 29, it was once again time to see how well the upgrade went. Here are screenshots of the entire process.

Beginners guide to Linux installation on flashdrive

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Linux

I know you like to try every new linux distribution, but not interested in burning cds and booting from it. Ok, here is a solution to your problem, install your linux distro in a flash drive and boot from it without going to the hassels of creating a boot cd.

Beginners guide to Ubuntu customization

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Linux

Considering the case of a beginner in Linux world, the most haunting task is that of window customization and now it is made easier with Ubuntu Tweak. Ubuntu Tweak functions like an extended control panel and simply facilitates the matching settings even more advanced users and even provides customization which is not possible by default installation

Elive 2.0 is Definitely a Jewel

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Linux

Elive has everything eye-candy and speed. Dubbed Topaz, Elive 2.0 is still powered by the Debian mammoth and the lightweight Enlightenment E17 desktop environment. The developers state that the it is so light that it uses only half of the resources on a system with less than 128 MB of system RAM!

How to add GUI for your open source applications?

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Linux

When do you think you are ready for creating your own application? GTK and Qt ,the same toolkits behind GNOME and KDE, are the best graphical toolkits fit for this job. Providing the same functionality they have their own advantages and disadvantages.

Pulseaudio and Kmix 4.4 in Sabayon 5

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Linux

Recently there have been a number of issues reported in the forums and other places of people having issues with pulseaudio and kmix after updating to KDE 4.4.0. I am glad to announce that most of those issues should now be resolved...

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KDE 4.4 Mail Misunderstanding Explained & Akregator Surprize

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Linux

I've gotten quite a few responses to my quickie look at KDE 4.4 under Mandriva written for this week's Distrowatch Weekly. One of which came from Aaron J. Seigo himself. I thought I might share some of what he said since several people expressed similar concerns on the topic here in comments. I also found one really super-duper neato new feature in Akegator in 4.4 that deserves a mention.

Buying a Linux Laptop ...

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Linux

It started with the hints of death of my Dell XPS 1330, a pattern I found discussed in a few forums online … the pattern is, first the adapter no longer is recognized as serving the appropriate wattage. (Which powers the laptop, but at a lower CPU rate and will not charge the battery. Bought a replacement adapter, and it worked for nearly a week, when it, too, failed with the dreaded message upon boot up. The next pattern is overheating, then motherboard failure. So, I began my quest for a replacement.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

5 open source fonts ideal for programming

What is the best programming font? First, you need to consider that not all fonts are created equally. When choosing a font for casual reading, the reader expects the letters to smoothly flow into one another, giving an easy and enjoyable experience. A single character for a standard font is akin to puzzle piece designed to carefully mesh with every other part of the overall typeface. When writing code, however, your font requirements are typically more functional in nature. This is why most programmers prefer to use monospaced fonts with fixed-width letters, when given the option. Selecting a font that has distinguishable numbers and punctuation, is aesthetically pleasing, and has a copyright license that meets your needs is also important. Read more

Firefox Quantum Now Rolling Out to All Ubuntu Linux Users, Update Now

It didn't take long, and just two days after its official launch, the Mozilla Firefox Quantum web browser (version 57.0) landed today in the stable software repositories of Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr). Firefox 57.0 a.k.a. Firefox Quantum is Mozilla's latest and greatest web browser, offering speeds twice as fast as of previous releases, thanks to the implementation of an all-new Photon browsing engine that's capable of leveraging the full potential of your personal computer, as well as a brand-new interface. Read more

GNU/Linux Laptops for Developers

  • 5 New & Powerful Dell Linux Machines You Can Buy Right Now
    The land of powerful PCs and workstations isn’t barren anymore when we talk about Linux-powered machines; even all of the world’s top 500 supercomputers now run Linux. Dell has joined hands with Canonical Inc. to give Linux-powered machines a push in the market. They have launched five new Canonical-certified workstations running Ubuntu Linux out-of-the-box as a part of the Dell Precision series. An advantage of buying these canonical-certified machines is that the users won’t have to worry about incompatibility with Linux.
  • How to set up a Pixelbook for programming
    The beauty of Chrome OS is that most of the "state" of your system is in the cloud, attached to your Google Account, but if you have any local documents those will be gone. This is because Developer Mode basically destroys the physically secure design of Chrome OS. Now you're in Linux land, and local security is your job, not Google's. Every time you boot up now, you'll have the option to press Space bar and wipe the system again and return to the safety of vanilla Chrome OS. Press Ctrl-D to continue into the unknown.