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Restore the Windows bootloader to MBR after dual-booting with Linux

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Linux

If you installed the Linux boot loader to the MBR and want to restore the Windows boot loader, this short tutorial shows you how to do it. It is an easy, point-and-click process. And the application that makes it that easy is called EasyBCD, a free-for-personal-use application from Neosmart Technologies.

4 Linux and a BSD Distro every Sysadmin should have in their toolbox

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Linux

While as a Sysadmin our world is generally speaking goverend by Windows Desktops and servers, Microsoft's OS isn't the best one out there at every task, for some tasks Linux is the answer, I've written on other blogs on a similar topic, about Linux Distros and which ones you will get he most out of. The idea behind most of these Linux Distros is they act as a tool or a set of tools to perform a certain task.
Each one of thses distros is free, downloads as an ISO and can be run (apart from one) booted from a CD without installation.

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How to dual-boot Windows 7 and Chakra Linux Archimedes, with shared NTFS partition at the end

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Linux

The broad objective, if it is not already evident from the title of this article, is to: Dual-boot Windows 7 and Chakra Archimedes on a computer with one hard drive; then, create an NTFS partition at the end of the drive that will be shared between both operating systems. When completed, you should see this screen when you reboot or restart the computer.

How to install and configure Gufw on Linux Deepin 11.12.1

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Linux

A new installation of Linux Deepin 11.12.1 does not have any of the network security applications that you find on Ubuntu enabled: A default installation of Linux Deepin 11.12.1, the latest edition, will leave your computer wide open for the bad guys to mess with.

Linux Deepin 11.12.1 review

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Linux

Linux Deepin is a desktop distribution based on Ubuntu Desktop, but using a modifed GNOME 3 shell, not Ubuntu’s Unity desktop. It was founded by Liu Wenhuan, who is also a co-founder of Wuhan Linux User Group (LUG), a LUG in Wuhan, the capital of Hubei province, China.

SalineOS 1.6 review

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Linux

SalineOS is a desktop Linux distribution based on Debian and uses the Xfce desktop environment. The first version reviewed on this website was SalineOS 1.1, and that was back in February 2011 . There has been several versions published since then – SalineOS 1.2, 1.3, 1.4 and 1.5. This article is a review of the latest version, SalineOS 1.6, which was released on February 1 2011.

Linux Deepin 11.12.1 screen shots

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Linux

Though I tend to stay away from publicly reviewing distributions that use the default GNOME 3 desktop, I evaluate them privately and if I come across one that has been modified to look like a true desktop operating system, then I will take the time to do what it takes to publish a review on it. Linux Deepin falls into that category. So expect a review of Linux Deepin soon.

Kubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin beta 1 screen shots

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Linux

Yet another screen shot post on yet another pre-stable release distribution. This time, it is from Kubuntu 12.04 beta 1, the first beta release of what will become Kubuntu 12.04 LTS (Long Term Support).

Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin beta 1 screen shots

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Linux

The first beta version of what will become Ubuntu 12.04, Precise Pangolin, has just been released. The final, stable version will be released by the end of April. This beta release, as with all pre-stable distribution releases, is an invitation for bug hunters to get busy.

Top 10 enterprise-grade features to expect in Fedora 17

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Linux

This article lists the top ten features that will appeal primarily to enterprise users. Keep in mind that most of them have not been fully implemented in Fedora 17 alpha, the first public release of what would become Fedora 17.

The features in alphabetical order, are:

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/03/01/top-10-enterprise-grade-features-to-expect-in-fedora-17/

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Review: Chakra GNU/Linux 2017.10

Chakra is an unusual distribution for a few reasons. It is a rare semi-rolling project, which tries to maintain a fairly stable base system while providing up to date applications. This is an interesting compromise between full rolling and static operating systems. The semi-rolling concept is an idea I like and I was curious to see how well the approach would work dealing with around six months of updates. I was pleased to find Chakra handled the massive upgrade well. Chakra was once also considered unusual for being very KDE-focused. There are more KDE distribution these days (KaOS, Kubuntu and KDE neon come readily to mind) and I think Chakra may have lost some of its appeal as more competition has established itself in the KDE-centric arena. I found the distribution to be easy to set up and pretty straight forward to use, but there were a few characteristics which bothered me during my trial with Chakra. One was that while updates installed cleanly, once Plasma 5.12 was installed, I experienced slow login times and reduced performance on the desktop. It could be argued that this is a Plasma problem, not a Chakra problem, but the distribution's rolling release nature means any regressions in new versions of software end up in the user's lap. Something that tends to bother me about distributions which focus on one desktop toolkit or another is that this approach to selecting software means we are sometimes using less capable tools in the name of toolkit purity. This is not a trade-off I like as I'd rather be using more polished applications over ones which a particular affiliation. Finally, Chakra includes a number of command line aliases which got in my way. This seems to be a problem I have been running into more often recently. Developers are trying to be helpful by aliasing common commands, but it means that for some tasks I need to change my habits or undefine the provided aliases and the feature ends up being a nuisance instead of a convenience. Chakra seems to be a capable and useful distribution and I am sure there are people who will appreciate the rolling release nature. Many people will likely also like having lots of KDE applications, and I can see the appeal of this combination. However, one thing which makes me hesitate to recommend Chakra is that the distribution does not appear to bring any special features to the ecosystem. It's a useful operating system and, to be completely fair, users can install non-KDE alternatives if they want to use LibreOffice instead of Calligra or GIMP instead of KolourPaint. But I'm not sure Chakra brings anything unique which makes it stand apart from openSUSE's Tumbleweed or KaOS's polished Plasma offering. Chakra used to be special in its semi-rolling, KDE-focused niche, but these days the distribution has a more competition and I'm not sure the project has any special sauce to set it apart from the crowd. Read more

Terminal app appears in Chome OS Dev, hints at future Linux application support

Back in February, some commits to the Chromium codebase revealed that Chrome OS would soon run Linux applications using a container. While it has been possible for years to run Linux applications on top of Chrome OS using crouton, it's a hacky solution that only works in Developer Mode. Google's solution would presumably work better, and perhaps not require Dev Mode to be enabled. Read more

​What's the most popular Linux of them all?

Let's cut to the chase. Android is the most popular of all Linux distributions. Period. End of statement. But that's not the entire story. Still it must be said, according to StatCounter, Android is the most popular of all operating systems. By a score of 39.49 percent to 36.63 percent, Android beats out Windows for global personal device supremacy. Sorry Windows, you had a nice run, but between your smartphone failures and the PC decline, your day is done. But, setting Android aside, what's the most popular Linux? It's impossible to work that out. The website-based analysis tools, such as those used by StatCounter, NetMarketShare, and the Federal government's Digital Analytics Program (DAP), can't tell the difference between Fedora, openSUSE, and Ubuntu. DAP does give one insightful measurement the others sites don't give us. While not nearly as popular as Android, Chrome OS is more popular than all the other Linux-based desktops combined by a score, in April 2018, of 1.3 percent to 0.6 percent of end users. Read more