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webOS: The latest open source, Linux distribution

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Linux

The source or cause of the joy is none other than the announcement from HP that webOS will be, in their own words, a “pure open source project.” Awesome! Did I see this coming? Yes, sir! Did I influence HP’s decision? Perhaps.

Tomboy and Dropbox, the Dynamic Duo

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Linux

I just saw an article headline about Tomboy and it's strengths. It made me think about all the reasons I use Tomboy and perhaps my favorite reason for using it.

I use Dropbox because I like having access to files regardless of what computer I'm using or where I'm at. It is extremely helpful to me.

Unity Phone Interface

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Linux

If Ubuntu is getting into the mobile platform then it needs to understand a few things, the first and most important is the message are sending out to the world with their world wide litigation against samsung over look and feel. The interface looking like IOS5 will cause you problems, this is Apple territory and as such must stay so.

In a recent post Ubuntu Mobile Phone Concepts on the OMGUbuntu site. concept art for a new Unity style touch interface and this design is very good.

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10 of the Best Free(ish) Alternative Business Applications

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Linux

It is no mistake that setting up a business is expensive, the IT side of it especially so. This expense is even worse during the current financial climate where you could really be investing the money in other areas of the business.

Traditionally the path to go down would be a Windows server, Windows Applications recurring licence costs etc. I'd like to introduce some alternatives for businesses which provide well supported systems at a fraction (if any) of the cost of the commercial alternatives. All of which run on Linux keeping the server costs down.

This isn't a technical guide, its not going to explain how to set any of the suggestions up, i've put this together to show there are cheaper more cost effective long term solutions than the usual business fare.

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Gnome 3 works if done right.

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Linux

Any change to something which has been done the same way for years is going to cause an uproar, before Gnome 3 as far back as IT history goes major changes to GUI's have caused friction. The earliest i remember is the change from Windows 3.1 to Windows 95 which was a huge change in an OS, the Windows 7 used today is not really that different in concept from Windows 95. When OSX was released same thing and most recently the KDE 3.5 to 4.0 change is still causing friction years after the update.

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This is the desktop Ubuntu needs to run with..

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Linux

While Unity may not be best interface ever, the Ubuntu project is not short of great desktops, and one of the best and most intuitive is the KDE Netbook Interface, its based on the KDE Plasma system, and while it is by far the best netbook interface by far, it also works REALLY well on desktops.

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Is Mark Shuttleworth the new Steve Jobs?

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Linux

While the world is out there looking in retrospective at the life and times of Steve Jobs, the question is also being asked will we ever see another Steve Jobs in out lifetime? or Who will the next Steve Jobs be?

With the IT industry still really in its infancy, the founders of the computer industry are all getting on, Bill Gates, Steve Wozniak, Larry Ellison and other such illuminati are our gods the founders. while they no longer have a day to day effect on the industry they founded directly there is no doubt they still hold sway and have valid opinion.

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Forget about the iCloud setup an Ubuntu myCloud..

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Linux

The internet is moving to the cloud, and its going to cost you, once you've chose the service, you're pretty much locked in because the time its going to take to upload your files, you'll be fed up waiting and won't want to move servers. There is an alternative however because rather than invest in someone else's infrastructure and paying them your cold hard cash you can build your own cloud. Your own little pot of gold at the end of the rainbow..

What will we be doing?

What we are going to build here, is our own cloud server, so the PC you build it on must be able to be on all the time and attached to a fairly decent broadband connection. The server will supply media over the internet streaming video, music from your own collection over the internet (3G or Wifi) to an iPad or Android device, or a Laptop . You will also be able to host your own email address and web server which will allow you to show your photos to the world should you wish. Finally we will supply a secure system for accessing your files remotely. These are all services which you could purchase over the web however you will be hosting yourself.

During the install process i'll be drawing from many websites and these will be listed at the end of the tutorial if you want to read more. I've set this up myself so know it works well.

Find Out how...

Should "There is more to Linux than Ubuntu.." be "Is there more to Linux than Ubuntu.."

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Linux

I've been blogging a lot more about Linux recently, and there is a reason for that. I have a strong belief that the rise of Ubuntu has killed the Linux desktop. There appears to be a severe lack of innovation out there in Linux desktop land with Ubuntu Spin Offs being all over the place. Ubuntu in a shiny new jacket is still Debian..

Who is going to step up to the mark from one of the other Distros and give ubuntu a run for its money? Or am i right, and Ubuntu has the desktop pwnd now.. And Unity will become the Desktop wars Winner?

Is this what the Linux Desktop market has boiled down to a commercial distro link Canonicals Ubuntu has triumphed over years of community blood sweat and toil?

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Sabayon 7 on Acer Aspire One D255

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Linux

The Acer Aspire one is a a 1Gb, Intel Atom Netbook PC, and while you may think the netbook is dead, having a low powered throw in the bag computer is never a bad thing. However even in these heady days when Microsoft are willing to convince you that Windows 7 will happily run on devices such as this, and then effectively killed the market a customers just couldn't figure out why their £200 netbook ran like a dog there is still hope with the Gnome 3 based Distro..

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • EMC prioritizes open-source integration
    Josh Bernstein, EMC’s new VP of technical strategy, sat down with Stu Miniman and Brian Gracely, cohosts of theCUBE, from the SiliconANGLE Media team, during EMC World to talk about the value open source brings to EMC.
  • 10 Tips for Coding with Open Source Software
    Bootstrap is a framework to help you design websites faster and easier. It includes HTML and CSS based design templates for typography, forms, buttons, tables, navigation, modals, image carousels, etc. It also gives you support for JavaScript plugins.
  • Cisco Pushes Forward with Open-Source Strategy [VIDEO]
    For the last year, Lauren Cooney has been running open source strategy for the Chief Technology and Architecture Office at Cisco. Cooney's career includes time spent at some of the biggest IT vendors in the world, including Microsoft as well as rival networking vendor Juniper, but the Cisco experience for her is a bit different, especially in terms of open source. In a video interview, Cooney discusses why Cisco is investing in open source and how it determines whether a project can work on Github alone, or if it needs a broad foundation to support it.
  • NPV Considerations for Open Source Big Data Technologies
    Mention the words “open source” and all kinds ideas probably come to mind such as “free”, “agility”, and “speed”. However, with any IT project, it is important to look at business benefits vs. costs in a manner that goes beyond generalizations. One method for benefit-cost analysis for open source big data projects is Net Present Value (NPV). It’s not unusual to find the IT community excited about the possibilities of open source. And with good reason as adoption of open source big data technologies may provide companies flexibility in charting their own path, ability to innovate faster and move at the speed of business. And yet, it is sage advice to temper some of the frenzy in adopting open source with a financial analysis.
  • Demystifying Containers for a Better DevOps Experience
  • Break scalability barriers in OpenFlow SDN
    Over the past couple of years, software-defined networking (SDN) has emerged as a strong alternative to traditional networking approaches in the areas of WAN, data center networks, and network overlay solutions. The primary benefit realized from SDN, besides open networking, is the ability to accelerate service deployments. SDN solutions using OpenFlow tackle complex problems, including dynamic provisioning, interconnection, and fault management. Although the functionality of SDN has evolved and matured, the scalability of SDNs based on OpenFlow has been limited by OpenFlow’s ties to ternary content-addressable memory (TCAM). OpenFlow by design was implemented in the TCAM.
  • Open-source project lets players experience Fallout 4 in VR
    This week, Fallout 4 players will finally be able to experience post-apocalyptic Boston firsthand, thanks to the VR capabilities of the Oculus Rift. However, this isn’t an official patch released by Bethesda; instead, the functionality is being offered up by a third-party, open-source project called Vireio Perception.
  • MapR Delivers Free Streaming Data Analytics Training
  • UPSat, an open-source Greek satellite
    As part of this mission UPsat is equipped with a specialized scientific instrument (mNLP) designed for its mission needs. Every other component of the satellite is designed from scratch, built, tested and integrated by engineers, scientists and developers of the University of Patras and Libre Space Foundation. That includes the structural framework, the on board mission control computer, the telecommunications system, the power management system and the software that runs across all different subsystems.
  • Distributed tracing — the most wanted and missed tool in the micro-service world.
    We, as engineers, always wanted to simplify and automate things. This is something in our nature. That’s how our brains work. That’s how procedural programming was born. After some time, the next level of evolution was object oriented programming. The idea was always the same. Take something big and try to split it into isolated abstractions with hidden implementations. It is much easier to think about complex system using abstractions. It is way more efficient to develop isolated blocks.

Rugged IoT gateway runs Linux on Atom

Axiomtek’s rugged, Atom E3815-based “ICO300-MI” IoT gateway features Wind River Intelligent Device Platform XT v3.1, and operates over -20 to 70°C. We missed Axiomtek’s ICO300-MI gateway the first time around, but the company has now relaunched the product to promote the addition of Intel IoT Gateway Technology and the Linux-based Wind River Intelligent Device Platform XT v3.1. The latter is a middleware stack based on Wind River Linux that offers secure IoT device management and data aggregation services. Read more

Fedora-Based Sugar on a Stick Is One Sweet Desktop

Sugar's design principles are anything but the one-level computer interface found in preschool toys. Rather, it's suitable for inexperienced users as well as more advanced or older users. While Sugar is simple to use, that does not mean it's lacking real user features. The interface limits settings and controls to those needed for the task at hand, and the design avoids bloated interface syndrome. Read more

Rugged Jetson TX1 carrier boards start at $175

Connect Tech released two more carrier boards for Nvidia’s Linux-driven Jetson TX1 COM: the basic Oribtty and more feature-rich, mini-PCIe enabled Elroy. A month ago, Connect Tech launched its Astro carrier board built around Nvidia’s Jetson TX1 computer-on-module, as well as a rugged “Rosie” embedded computer based on the Astro. Shortly afterward, the Ontario-based company released a stripped down version called the “Elroy,” and it has now followed up with an even more basic “Orbitty” board. Read more