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Reiser

Reiser4 Brought To The Linux 5.0 Kernel

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Reiser

For those still using the out-of-tree Reiser4 file-system, it may be about time to consider alternatives like Btrfs, XFS, ZFS On Linux, F2FS, or even the likes of Stratis and Bcachefs. But should you still be using this once promising file-system, the out-of-tree patches have been revised to now work with the Linux 5.0 kernel.

There still is no trajectory for Reiser4 to the mainline Linux kernel with no major companies or other stakeholders backing Reiser4 but just a small group of developers and enthusiasts left working on this successor to ReiserFS. With the latest code posted on Friday by former Namesys developer Edward Shishkin, the Reiser4 kernel driver has been re-based to the Linux 5.0 kernel but with no other changes to the file-system noted.

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Reiser4 File-System Benchmarks With Linux 4.17

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Reiser

It's been about three years since last carrying out any file-system performance benchmarks of Reiser4, but being curious how it stacks up against the current state of today's mainline Linux file-systems, here are some fresh performance tests of Reiser4 using the Linux 4.17 kernel. The Reiser4 performance was compared to Reiserfs, EXT4, Btrfs, XFS, and F2FS.

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Reiser4 Updated For Linux 4.14 & Introduces Zstd Compression Support

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Reiser

The out-of-tree Reiser4 file-system driver has been updated with compatibility for the latest Linux 4.14 stable series. Besides reworking the code to run on Linux 4.14, this controversial file-system has also added support for Zstd file-system compression.

Linux 4.14 introduced Zstd support in the mainline kernel and wired it in for SquashFS and Btrfs. Our Btrfs Zstd benchmarks have been promising for transparent file-system compression compared to the other supported algorithms. Reiser4 has now picked up Zstd compression as an eventual replacement to their Gzip compression support.

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Reiser4 Is Now Ready For Linux 4.13

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Reiser

For those wanting to use the Reiser4 file-system with the just-released Linux 4.13 kernel, patches are already available.

Less than one week after the release of the Linux 4.13 stable kernel, Edward Shishkin has already released an updated patch for the out-of-tree Reiser4 file-system for working with this new stable series.

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Reiser4 Updated For Linux 4.12, Experimental Data Striping Support

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Those using the Reiser4 file-system in some capacity can now safely upgrade to the Linux 4.12 kernel.

Edward Shishkin has updated this out-of-tree file-system for the Linux 4.12 kernel so it can be built with the latest mainline stable release.

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Reiser4 Updated For The Linux 4.10 Kernel

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Reiser

The out-of-tree Reiser4 file-system has been updated for the Linux 4.10 kernel.

Reiser4 for the Linux 4.10.0 kernel is available as of earlier this week, managing to release their updated file-system driver code quite promptly. This port to Linux 4.10 yielded a few changes to the Reiser4 code as they re-based to this Linux kernel with the ->readlink() of inode operations being removed as well as the WRITE_FLUSH_FUA flag being removed.

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Reiser4 Is Now Available For Linux 4.9, Mirror Code Almost Stable

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Reiser

For those that haven't yet switched to Btrfs, ZFS On Linux, or running EXT4/XFS but holding out hope for Reiser4, this out-of-tree file-system code has been updated for Linux 4.9.

Reiser4 was released for Linux 4.9.0 last weekend but then a revised patch series came out three days ago to fix some problems with this port to 4.9. With the new Reiser4 patches built against Linux 4.9.1, all should be well if you want to use this experimental file-system on the newest Linux kernel.

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Reiser4 Now Available For Linux 4.8 Kernel

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Reiser

While Linux 4.9 will be released in just a few weeks, the remaining Reiser4 file-system developers have just updated their code to support the Linux 4.8 stable kernel.

Reiser4 for Linux 4.8.0 is now available for those wanting to run this out-of-tree file-system on the current stable kernel. The Reiser4 kernel is now compatible with 4.8 and there is also a kernel oops fix when mounting forward-incompatible volumes, unneeded assertions were removed, some VFS changes were made, and there is now rename2 support.

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Reiser4 Implements Mirror & Failover Support

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Reiser

Edward Shishkin, one of the last remaining Reiser4 developers and the one who has been leading this out-of-tree file-system the past few years, has implemented logical volumes support with support for mirrors (in effect, RAID 0) and failover support at the file-system level.

Shishkin quietly announced on Sunday, "Reiser4 will support logical (compound) volumes. For now we have implemented the simplest ones - mirrors. As a supplement to existing checksums it will provide a failover - an important feature, which will reduce number of cases when your volume needs to be repaired by fsck."

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Reiser4 Now Has Support For The Linux 4.7 Kernel

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The Reiser4 file-system now has support for the latest stable Linux kernel series, Linux 4.7.

Released this morning by Edward Shishkin was the updated Reiser4 file-system driver patch that provides compatibility for Linux 4.7.0. The only other change besides porting over to Linux 4.7 is a small returned optimization.

There's been no talk in a few years about attempting to mainline the Reiser4 file-system in the Linux kernel. Thus for now if you want to try out this once-promising file-system, swing by SourceForge to patch your kernel.

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Nebra Anybeam turns your Raspberry Pi into a pocket home cinema projector

TVs are available to buy in truly huge sizes these days, and with 4K (and upwards) resolution, movies and TV shows really come to life. But there’s something even more magical about watching a film projected onto a screen or a wall. With the right setup, it can be like having a cinema in your home. You don’t necessarily need to spend a fortune on a projector though. Nebra Anybeam can turn your Raspberry Pi into a cinema projector that you can slip into your pocket and take anywhere. Read more Also: Nebra AnyBeam - world's smallest pocket cinema projectors

Back in the Day: UNIX, Minix and Linux

I don't remember my UCSD email address, but some years later, I was part of the admin team on the major UUCP hub hplabs, and my email address was simply hplabs!taylor. Somewhere along the way, networking leaped forward with TCP/IP (we had TCP/IP "Bake Offs" to test interoperability). Once we had many-to-many connectivity, it was clear that the "bang" notation was unusable and unnecessarily complicated. We didn't want to worry about routing, just destination. Enter the "@" sign. I became taylor@hplabs.com. Meanwhile, UNIX kept growing, and the X Window System from MIT gained popularity as a UI layer atop the UNIX command line. In fact, X is a public domain implementation of the windowing system my colleagues and I first saw at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center. PARC had computers where multiple programs were on the screen simultaneously in "windows", and there was a pointer device used to control them—so cool. Doug Englebart was inspired too; he went back to Stanford Research Institute and invented the mouse to make control of those windows easier. At Apple, they also saw what was being created at PARC and were inspired to create the Macintosh with all its windowing goodness. Still, who doesn't love the command line, as Ritchie and Kernighan had originally designed it in the early days of UNIX? (UNIX, by the way, is a wordplay on a prior multiuser operating system called Multics, but that's another story.) Read more

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GNU/Linux Leftovers

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  • At Least 27% Of Gentoo's Portage Can Be Easily LTO Optimized For Better Performance
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