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Reiser

Reiser4 File-System Benchmarks With Linux 4.17

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Linux
Reiser

It's been about three years since last carrying out any file-system performance benchmarks of Reiser4, but being curious how it stacks up against the current state of today's mainline Linux file-systems, here are some fresh performance tests of Reiser4 using the Linux 4.17 kernel. The Reiser4 performance was compared to Reiserfs, EXT4, Btrfs, XFS, and F2FS.

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Reiser4 Updated For Linux 4.14 & Introduces Zstd Compression Support

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The out-of-tree Reiser4 file-system driver has been updated with compatibility for the latest Linux 4.14 stable series. Besides reworking the code to run on Linux 4.14, this controversial file-system has also added support for Zstd file-system compression.

Linux 4.14 introduced Zstd support in the mainline kernel and wired it in for SquashFS and Btrfs. Our Btrfs Zstd benchmarks have been promising for transparent file-system compression compared to the other supported algorithms. Reiser4 has now picked up Zstd compression as an eventual replacement to their Gzip compression support.

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Reiser4 Is Now Ready For Linux 4.13

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Reiser

For those wanting to use the Reiser4 file-system with the just-released Linux 4.13 kernel, patches are already available.

Less than one week after the release of the Linux 4.13 stable kernel, Edward Shishkin has already released an updated patch for the out-of-tree Reiser4 file-system for working with this new stable series.

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Reiser4 Updated For Linux 4.12, Experimental Data Striping Support

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Reiser

Those using the Reiser4 file-system in some capacity can now safely upgrade to the Linux 4.12 kernel.

Edward Shishkin has updated this out-of-tree file-system for the Linux 4.12 kernel so it can be built with the latest mainline stable release.

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Reiser4 Updated For The Linux 4.10 Kernel

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Reiser

The out-of-tree Reiser4 file-system has been updated for the Linux 4.10 kernel.

Reiser4 for the Linux 4.10.0 kernel is available as of earlier this week, managing to release their updated file-system driver code quite promptly. This port to Linux 4.10 yielded a few changes to the Reiser4 code as they re-based to this Linux kernel with the ->readlink() of inode operations being removed as well as the WRITE_FLUSH_FUA flag being removed.

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Reiser4 Is Now Available For Linux 4.9, Mirror Code Almost Stable

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Reiser

For those that haven't yet switched to Btrfs, ZFS On Linux, or running EXT4/XFS but holding out hope for Reiser4, this out-of-tree file-system code has been updated for Linux 4.9.

Reiser4 was released for Linux 4.9.0 last weekend but then a revised patch series came out three days ago to fix some problems with this port to 4.9. With the new Reiser4 patches built against Linux 4.9.1, all should be well if you want to use this experimental file-system on the newest Linux kernel.

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Reiser4 Now Available For Linux 4.8 Kernel

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Reiser

While Linux 4.9 will be released in just a few weeks, the remaining Reiser4 file-system developers have just updated their code to support the Linux 4.8 stable kernel.

Reiser4 for Linux 4.8.0 is now available for those wanting to run this out-of-tree file-system on the current stable kernel. The Reiser4 kernel is now compatible with 4.8 and there is also a kernel oops fix when mounting forward-incompatible volumes, unneeded assertions were removed, some VFS changes were made, and there is now rename2 support.

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Reiser4 Implements Mirror & Failover Support

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Reiser

Edward Shishkin, one of the last remaining Reiser4 developers and the one who has been leading this out-of-tree file-system the past few years, has implemented logical volumes support with support for mirrors (in effect, RAID 0) and failover support at the file-system level.

Shishkin quietly announced on Sunday, "Reiser4 will support logical (compound) volumes. For now we have implemented the simplest ones - mirrors. As a supplement to existing checksums it will provide a failover - an important feature, which will reduce number of cases when your volume needs to be repaired by fsck."

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Reiser4 Now Has Support For The Linux 4.7 Kernel

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Reiser

The Reiser4 file-system now has support for the latest stable Linux kernel series, Linux 4.7.

Released this morning by Edward Shishkin was the updated Reiser4 file-system driver patch that provides compatibility for Linux 4.7.0. The only other change besides porting over to Linux 4.7 is a small returned optimization.

There's been no talk in a few years about attempting to mainline the Reiser4 file-system in the Linux kernel. Thus for now if you want to try out this once-promising file-system, swing by SourceForge to patch your kernel.

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Linux Filesystems

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Linux
Reiser
Movies
  • My assessment of “btrfs”

    In short: Novelist Stephen Elliott (James Franco) find himself drawn to the high-profile Hans Reiser (Christian Slater) murder trial - a case that brings him closer to his own troubled past with father (Ed Harris). Amber Heard, Wilmer Valderrama and Cynthia Nixon also star. (Watch the trailer)

  • The Adderall Diaries

    While Romanowsky gamely tries to negotiate the same structural tricks as the book, which employed the Reiser case as a base camp from which the author could depart and return, in the film it feels more like a subplot despite the cinematic tricks -- the cross-cutting and slo-mo flashbacks -- that the director uses to try to connect the stories. At times it feels flat, other times risible, and only occasionally do the stories resonate in any kind of harmony.

  • My assessment of “btrfs”

    Short version — I will continue to use “ext4” in future installs.

    Note that this a personal view, not a recommendation. My own choice depends on how I use computers and my practices for backup, recovery, etc. Your practices are likely different. Much of this post will be about my considerations in deciding against “btrfs” for my own use.

[via Susan]

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu MATE - Pimp your desktop to perfection

Ubuntu MATE has made a quantum leap of innovation in the past several months, offering a wealth of visual and functional changes and a mindblowing level of flexibility when it comes to customization. You really have the ability to implement anything and everything, and all of it natively, from within the system's interface. The list of options is so long that it can be overwhelming. Hopefully, this little pimping guide puts some order into this fine and rich chaos. Ubuntu Bionic isn't the most refined distro, but it sure has the almost infinite possibilities to make it appear and behave how you want it. You can have a classic desktop one day and then a MAC-like thing the next and then Ubuntu Unity the day after that. It's all there, very slick, very elegant. Well, it's time for you to do some exploring. See you. Read more

Games: Atari VCS, NEC, Pillars of Eternity II: Deadfire – Beast of Winter, State of Mind

  • Atari VCS RAM upgraded to 8GB and Atari confirm you can put a normal Linux distribution on it
    While I remain quite sceptical of the Atari VCS, I'm still pretty interested in it as a Linux gaming device. Atari recently did a Q&A blog post detailing some interesting information about it. The post is written by Rob Wyatt, the System Architect for the Atari VCS device. If the name Rob Wyatt doesn't ring a bell—they were the original Xbox system architect.
  • Atari VCS Product Q&A #1
    At this time the developer program is not open yet and it will come online in the coming months. If you have an application in mind you can start today, make sure it runs on Linux at HD resolution using standard runtime libraries, the changes from this to the AtariOS will be minimal and mostly related to application startup and application packaging. In the very near future we will release documentation on the AtariOS which will detail all the runtime components we support as well as libraries for Linux that mimic the AtariOS.
  • Is it worth $129 to relive your NES Duck Hunt glory days?

    But the folks behind the Modern Mallard Kickstarter campaign figured out a way to overcome this problem -- by using a speedy processor to rewrite the game's code in real time, counteracting the lag. The project includes a hardware mod for both the original Duck Hunt game cartridge and Zapper that makes it compatible with LCD, LED and OLED TVs. Note that the campaign doesn't include the game cartridge or Zapper, so you'll have to use your own.

    You can read more about how the mods work at the bottom of the Kickstarter page.

  • Pillars of Eternity II: Deadfire – Beast of Winter due out early next month
    The first piece of expansion content will be released 2 August. Expect to get caught up in a different realm, the Beyond, and face new enemies and puzzles.
  • Futuristic thriller 'State of Mind' has a new story trailer and releasing a day earlier than expected
    Daedalic Entertainment's futuristic thriller 'State of Mind' has a new story trailer out and a new release date. When we mentioned it last month, they gave us a release date of August 16th. However, they seem to have moved it forward as it's now going to release on August 15th. This will come with same-day Linux support!

Security Leftovers

  • Data breaches show we’re only three clicks away from anarchy
    An IT glitch afflicting BP petrol stations for three hours last Sunday evening might not sound like headline news. A ten-hour meltdown of Visa card payment systems in June was a bigger story — as was the notorious TSB computer upgrade cock-up that started on 20 April, which was still afflicting customers a month later and was reported this week to be causing ruptures between TSB and its Spanish parent Sabadell. Meanwhile, what do Fortnum & Mason, Dixons Carphone, Costa Coffee and its sister company Premier Inn have in common with various parts of the NHS? The answer is that they have all suffered recent large-scale ‘data breaches’ that may have put private individuals’ information at risk. IT Governance, a blog that monitors international news stories in this sphere, came up with a global figure of 145 million ‘records leaked’ last month alone. Such leaks are daily events everywhere — and a lesson of the TSB story was that cyber fraudsters are waiting to attack wherever private data becomes accessible, whether because of computer breakdown or lax data protection.
  • UK security researcher Hutchins makes renewed bid for freedom

    British security researcher Marcus Hutchins, who was arrested by the FBI last August over alleged charges of creating and distributing a banking trojan, has made a fresh bid to go free, claiming that the US has no territorial jurisdiction to file charges against him for alleged crimes committed elsewhere.

  • Common Ground: For Secure Elections and True National Security

    An open letter by Gloria Steinem, Noam Chomsky, John Dean, Governor Bill Richardson, Walter Mosley, Michael Moore, Valerie Plame, and others.

Containers or virtual machines: ​Which is more secure? The answer will surprise you

Are virtual machines (VM) more secure than containers? You may think you know the answer, but IBM Research has found containers can be as secure, or more secure, than VMs. James Bottomley, an IBM Research Distinguished Engineer and top Linux kernel developer, writes: "One of the biggest problems with the current debate about Container vs Hypervisor security is that no-one has actually developed a way of measuring security, so the debate is all in qualitative terms (hypervisors 'feel' more secure than containers because of the interface breadth) but no-one actually has done a quantitative comparison." To meet this need, Bottomley created Horizontal Attack Profile (HAP), designed to describe system security in a way that it can be objectively measured. Bottomley has discovered that "a Docker container with a well crafted seccomp profile (which blocks unexpected system calls) provides roughly equivalent security to a hypervisor." Read more