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Reiser

Reiser's children file wrongful death suit against father

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Reiser

insidebayarea.com: The two children of computer programmer Hans Reiser have filed a wrongful death lawsuit against their father in connection with the murder of their mother, Nina Reiser.

Reiser sentenced to 15 years-to-life as part of deal

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contracostatimes.com: Hans Reiser was sentenced today to 15-years-to life for the murder of his estranged wife Nina Reiser two years ago. The sentence handed down in Alameda County Superior Court follows a deal Reiser made to lead authorities to the location of his wife's body in the Oakland Hills last month.

reiserfs undeletion: the lost, the found, and the ugly

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Software

lucidfox.org: When mass-renaming video files for Mai-HiME (which I recommend to anime fans out there, unless anything involving magical girls in any way is not your thing; but not the point), I made a mistake in the mv command, which caused all files to be moved to a single destination. I immediately Googled up an instruction on undeleting files on reiserfs...

Death of a filesystem (?)

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nuxified.org/blog: Over the last months there were repeating news about the murder on Nina Reiser by her husband Hans Reiser, known in the community for his work on his filesystems ReiserFS and Reiser4.

Killer Reiser In Jailhouse Interview: Sorry I Lied

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Reiser
Interviews

cbs5.com: In an exclusive interview with CBS News at the Santa Rita Jail in Dublin, 44-year-old Hans Reiser said he was sorry he lied on the witness stand during his trial when he maintained he had nothing to do with 31-year old Nina Reiser's death.

My interview with murderer Hans Reiser

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Reiser
Interviews

salon.com: Five days before the computer genius who killed his wife led police to her body, he was remorseless and angry in defense of his innocence. I showed up at the Santa Rita Jail during visiting hours to meet Hans Reiser and I knew if I was ever going to talk with him, I had to do it before he was transferred to state prison.

Reiser tells authorities he strangled his wife during argument

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Reiser

mercurynews.com: Convicted killer Hans Reiser has admitted that he strangled his estranged wife Nina Reiser during a argument while his children played unaware in another part of the house in the Oakland hills.

Also: Reiser: Guilty. Reiser4 Lives On

Hans Reiser leads police to wife's remains

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Reiser

abclocal.go.com: ABC News has confirmed that authorities are in the process of recovering Nina Reiser's remains from Redwood Regional Park, east of Skyline Boulevard. ABC News reports Reiser led them to his wife's remains.

Lawyers to Judge: Hans Reiser May Be 'Mentally Incompetent'

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blog.wired.com: Lawyers for Hans Reiser claim the Linux developer convicted of murdering his wife may be "mentally incompetent," an argument that, if successful, could send Reiser to a mental institution instead of prison.

New Development with Reiser

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Reiser

scienceblogs.com: Hans Reiser developed a file system a while back, for LInux computers (but in theory useful for other systems as well) which is probably the best file system out there. Hans Reiser has just recently been convicted of murdering his wife. I have two related proposals.

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