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Reiser

reiserfs undeletion: the lost, the found, and the ugly

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Reiser
Software

lucidfox.org: When mass-renaming video files for Mai-HiME (which I recommend to anime fans out there, unless anything involving magical girls in any way is not your thing; but not the point), I made a mistake in the mv command, which caused all files to be moved to a single destination. I immediately Googled up an instruction on undeleting files on reiserfs...

Death of a filesystem (?)

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Reiser

nuxified.org/blog: Over the last months there were repeating news about the murder on Nina Reiser by her husband Hans Reiser, known in the community for his work on his filesystems ReiserFS and Reiser4.

Killer Reiser In Jailhouse Interview: Sorry I Lied

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Reiser
Interviews

cbs5.com: In an exclusive interview with CBS News at the Santa Rita Jail in Dublin, 44-year-old Hans Reiser said he was sorry he lied on the witness stand during his trial when he maintained he had nothing to do with 31-year old Nina Reiser's death.

My interview with murderer Hans Reiser

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Reiser
Interviews

salon.com: Five days before the computer genius who killed his wife led police to her body, he was remorseless and angry in defense of his innocence. I showed up at the Santa Rita Jail during visiting hours to meet Hans Reiser and I knew if I was ever going to talk with him, I had to do it before he was transferred to state prison.

Reiser tells authorities he strangled his wife during argument

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Reiser

mercurynews.com: Convicted killer Hans Reiser has admitted that he strangled his estranged wife Nina Reiser during a argument while his children played unaware in another part of the house in the Oakland hills.

Also: Reiser: Guilty. Reiser4 Lives On

Hans Reiser leads police to wife's remains

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Reiser

abclocal.go.com: ABC News has confirmed that authorities are in the process of recovering Nina Reiser's remains from Redwood Regional Park, east of Skyline Boulevard. ABC News reports Reiser led them to his wife's remains.

Lawyers to Judge: Hans Reiser May Be 'Mentally Incompetent'

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Reiser

blog.wired.com: Lawyers for Hans Reiser claim the Linux developer convicted of murdering his wife may be "mentally incompetent," an argument that, if successful, could send Reiser to a mental institution instead of prison.

New Development with Reiser

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Reiser

scienceblogs.com: Hans Reiser developed a file system a while back, for LInux computers (but in theory useful for other systems as well) which is probably the best file system out there. Hans Reiser has just recently been convicted of murdering his wife. I have two related proposals.

Hans Reiser Offers To Lead Cops to Nina's Body

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Reiser

blog.wired.com: Hans Reiser, the Linux programmer facing a mandatory 25-to life term for killing his wife, might disclose the location of Nina Reiser's body in exchange for a reduced term, Alameda County District Attorney Thomas Orloff told Threat Level on Friday.

'48 Hours' to focus on Hans Reiser murder trial

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Reiser

insidebayarea.com: A national news show will air an hour program chronicling the murder case and trial of computer programmer Hans Reiser CBS's 48 Hours Mystery is set to air "Betrayal," Tuesday night at 9 p.m. on local channel CBS 5.

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More in Tux Machines

RISC-V and NVIDIA

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  • SiFive Announces First Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform With NVIDIA Deep Learning Accelerator Technology
    SiFive, the leading provider of commercial RISC-V processor IP, today announced the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA's Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology. The demo will be shown this week at the Hot Chips conference and consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive's HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the world's first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is well suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive's silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.
  • SiFive Announces Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform with Nvidia Deep Learning Accelerator Technology
    SiFive, a leading provider of commercial RISC-V processor IP, today announced the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA’s Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology. The demo will be shown this week at the Hot Chips conference and consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive’s HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the world’s first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is well suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive’s silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.
  • NVIDIA Unveils The GeForce RTX 20 Series, Linux Benchmarks Should Be Coming
    NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang has just announced the GeForce RTX 2080 series from his keynote ahead of Gamescom 2018 this week in Cologne, Germany.
  • NVIDIA have officially announced the GeForce RTX 2000 series of GPUs, launching September
    The GPU race continues on once again, as NVIDIA have now officially announced the GeForce RTX 2000 series of GPUs and they're launching in September. This new series will be based on their Turing architecture and their RTX platform. These new RT Cores will "enable real-time ray tracing of objects and environments with physically accurate shadows, reflections, refractions and global illumination." which sounds rather fun.

today's leftovers

GNOME Shell, Mutter, and Ubuntu's GNOME Theme

Benchmarks on GNU/Linux

  • Linux vs. Windows Benchmark: Threadripper 2990WX vs. Core i9-7980XE Tested
    The last chess benchmark we’re going to look at is Crafty and again we’re measuring performance in nodes per second. Interestingly, the Core i9-7980XE wins out here and saw the biggest performance uplift when moving to Linux, a 5% performance increase was seen opposed to just 3% for the 2990WX and this made the Intel CPU 12% faster overall.
  • Which is faster, rsync or rdiff-backup?
    As our data grows (and some filesystems balloon to over 800GBs, with many small files) we have started seeing our night time backups continue through the morning, causing serious disk i/o problems as our users wake up and regular usage rises. For years we have implemented a conservative backup policy - each server runs the backup twice: once via rdiff-backup to the onsite server with 10 days of increments kept. A second is an rsync to our offsite backup servers for disaster recovery. Simple, I thought. I will change the rdiff-backup to the onsite server to use the ultra fast and simple rsync. Then, I'll use borgbackup to create an incremental backup from the onsite backup server to our off site backup servers. Piece of cake. And with each server only running one backup instead of two, they should complete in record time. Except, some how the rsync backup to the onsite backup server was taking almost as long as the original rdiff-backup to the onsite server and rsync backup to the offsite server combined. What? I thought nothing was faster than the awesome simplicity of rsync, especially compared to the ancient python-based rdiff-backup, which hasn't had an upstream release since 2009.