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Reiser

Defense wraps up closing argument in Hans Reiser trial

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sfgate.com (AP): The defense attorney for a software programmer accused of killing his estranged wife told jurors Monday the prosecution hasn't proved the woman is dead, let alone murdered.

Reiser a Victim of 'One of the Great Screw Jobs,' Lawyer Says

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blog.wired.com: Linux programmer Hans Reiser is the victim of police "shading" and "one of the great screw jobs" perpetrated by his wife, who the open source developer is accused of killing, his attorney, William DuBois, told jurors during his second day of closing arguments here.

Reiser Prosecutor to Jurors: 'You Know He Killed Her'

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blog.wired.com: The prosecutor in the Hans Reiser murder trial on Wednesday continued for a second day to poke at Linux programmer Hans Reiser's defense to accusations he murdered his wife two years ago.

Prosecutor Tells Jurors 'Nina is Dead' and Hans Reiser 'Killed Her'

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blog.wired.com: "Nina is dead and the defendant killed her," prosecutor Paul Hora told jurors at the outset of his closing arguments here. Hora conceded to jurors that the case is based largely on circumstantial evidence. But he said the defendant should not be "rewarded" for successfully disposing of her body.

Reiser Hard Drives Don't Map to Murder

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blog.wired.com: A computer forensic specialist testified in the Hans Reiser murder trial here Monday that the defendant's two hard drives he hid from the authorities did not contain evidence linking the Linux programmer to the 2006 disappearance of his estranged wife, Nina Reiser.

Jury Can Consider Lesser 'Manslaughter' Verdict, Reiser Judge Rules

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blog.wired.com: The judge in the Hans Reiser murder trial ruled here Tuesday that jurors may consider a lesser charge of voluntary manslaughter against the Linux coder. Jurors are expected to begin deliberating next week after they hear from a computer forensics specialist who will testify on Monday.

Hans Reiser Turns Up 'Geek Defense' to 11

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blog.wired.com: Linux programmer Hans Reiser put the pedal to the metal on his geek defense at his murder trial here Monday, explaining to jurors that, as nonscientists, they may not understand his social ineptness.

DNA expert called in to Reiser trial

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insidebayarea.com: A DNA expert for the defense team in the Hans Reiser murder trial said it is difficult to say how and when a small sample of blood was left on a post in the living room of Reiser's home.

Reiser presents hard drives in court

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abclocal.go.com: Two hard drives that computer engineer Hans Reiser removed from one of his computers shortly after his estranged wife Nina disappeared on Sept. 3, 2006, were produced in court today by his attorney, William DuBois.

Hans Reiser Explaining 'Construction Project' and Nina's Blood

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blog.wired.com: Hans Reiser took the witness stand for the eighth day at his murder trial here Monday and offered innocent explanations over why his wife's blood was discovered at his house, the last place where she was seen alive.

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