Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Reiser

Reiser Admits Trying to Hide Car From Police

Filed under
Reiser

blog.wired.com: Linux guru Hans Reiser conceded in open court here Thursday he was trying to hide his car from the police in the aftermath of his estranged wife's disappearance.

Reiser Fumbling: 'I Am Not Consistent In My Thinking'

Filed under
Reiser

blog.wired.com: The Hans Reiser murder trial resumed here Wednesday with the defendant fumbling on the witness stand. "Are you just making these things up?" Alameda County prosecutor Paul Hora asked at one point.

Hans Reiser Stumbles on Witness Stand; Defense Attorney Cuts Bait

Filed under
Reiser

blog.wired.com: Linux guru Hans Reiser took the witness stand for the fifth day at his murder trial here Tuesday and immediately decried the police as law breakers who will do anything to get a conviction, including the planting of evidence.

Reiser Says Wife Vanished After He Accused Her of Embezzlement

Filed under
Reiser

blog.wired.com: Linux guru Hans Reiser, on the witness stand here for the fourth day Monday, denied again that he killed his missing wife. The defendant claimed his 31-year-old wife, whom he married in 1999, abandoned her children because she embezzled hundreds of thousands of dollars from his Oakland-based Namesys company.

And: Hans Reiser Explaining Coincidences; Jury Seems Unmoved

Reiser Fumbling Over Why Police Told Nina to Get Gun

Filed under
Reiser

blog.wired.com: Murder defendant Hans Reiser fumbled for the first time on the witness stand Thursday, his third day of testifying before jurors who are weighing whether the popular Linux programmer killed his wife in 2006.

Also: Judge Gags Lawyers in Hans Reiser Murder Trial

Hans Reiser Testifying He Still Cares for Nina, Missing Seat Explained

Filed under
Reiser

wired blogs: Hans Reiser took the stand Wednesday for the second day at his murder trial here, telling jurors that he still has feelings for his estranged wife he is accused of killing.

Hans Reiser Denies Murdering His Wife

Filed under
Reiser

blog.wired.com: Hans Reiser was just sworn in. His attorney, William DuBois, is lobbing questions to him. The defendant says he met his wife in a café in 1998 in Russia.

Defense Planting Seeds of Doubt; Is the Reiser Son to be Believed?

Filed under
Reiser

blog.wired.com: The Hans Reiser defense on Thursday zeroed in on the case's only eyewitness -- the Linux programmer's 8-year-old son: A child psychologist took the stand in a bid to convince jurors that the boy, when he was 6, saw his mother Nina Reiser walk out of the Oakland hills house where prosecutors said she never left alive.

Hans Reiser Evading Police Because He Was Upset, Feared Arrest

Filed under
Reiser

blog.wired.com: Two weeks after Linux programmer Hans Reiser's wife went missing, he performed counter-surveillance measures because he thought he would be falsely arrested and he was "upset" over being beaten that day in a custody hearing concerning his two young children.

The Ego, the Filesystem and No Mention of Nina

Filed under
Reiser

blog.wired.com: Follow the logic: Hans Reiser, the popular open source programmer, could have but chose not to readily license his open source filesystem for millions of dollars. Therefore, he did not kill his wife.

Also: Judge Says Sufficient Evidence to 'Sustain a Conviction'

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Essential Guide: How to Upgrade to Ubuntu 20.04 (Beta) Right Now

Well, in this guide I show you the steps required to upgrade to Ubuntu 20.04 from Ubuntu 18.04 or Ubuntu 19.10 right now, , nice and early, ahead of the final release. You do not need to download an .iso, fuss around with a USB thumb drive, or lose any of your files — you can upgrade directly with a half-way decent internet connection. Just keep in mind that (at the time you read this) the final stable release of the Focal Fossa is not yet available, only a beta quality candidate is. Read more

Plasma Mobile: How to help us!

We often get asked: “how long until the 1.0 release?”. Or: “how far away is Plasma Mobile 1.0?”. The usual answer to both these question is “It’ll be ready when it is ready”. But, really, how do we know that it is ready? Recently some of us prepared a check list of items which we consider necessary before we can declare Plasma Mobile “ready” or at rc1 status. Read more

Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • Mesa 20.0.3 Released With Latest Open-Source Graphics Driver Fixes

    While many of you are users of Mesa Git for experiencing the bleeding-edge graphics drivers especially if you are a gamer wanting peak performance, for those on the Mesa stable series the Mesa 20.0.3 update has now shipped. Mesa 20.0.3 is the latest bi-weekly point release for back-porting the fixes to this Q1'2020 stable series.

  • Adrien Plazas: A Coloring API for GTK

    This week we had the Design Tools Hackfest 2020, virtualized because of COVID-19, where we discussed that recoloring API. We came up with something I think is interesting enough to discuss more widely.

  • [Former Canonical manager] Dustin Kirkland: Coordinated Launch Cycles at Apex

    I joined Apex Clearing last year, having spent the previous 20 years as a software engineer, product manager, and executive, mostly around open source software, including Ubuntu, OpenStack, and Kubernetes. Albeit IBM, Canonical and Google differ from fintech on many levels, these operating systems and cloud infrastructure technology platforms share a number of similarities with Apex's software-as-a-service platform. Moreover, there also exists some literal overlap: we’re heavy users of both Ubuntu and Kubernetes here at Apex. Ubuntu, OpenStack, and Kubernetes all share similar, predictable, time-based release cycles. Ubuntu has released every April and October, since October of 2004 – that's 32 major software platform releases, on time, every time, over 16 years. Ubuntu has set the bar for velocity, quality, and predictability in the open source world. OpenStack’s development processes have largely mirrored Ubuntu’s, with many of the early project leaders having been ex-Ubuntu engineers and managers. OpenStack, too, has utilized a 6-month development cycle, since 2010, now on its 20th release. Kubernetes came along in 2014, and sought to increase the pace a bit, with quarterly release cycles. Kubernetes is a little bit looser with dates than Ubuntu or OpenStack, but has generally cranked out 4 quality releases per year, over the last 6 years. I’ve been involved in each of these projects at some level, and I’ve thoroughly enjoyed coaching a number of early stage start-ups on how to apply these principles to their product development methodologies.

  • Ulrike Uhlig: Breaking the chain reaction of reactions to reactions

    Each of these interactions is embedded in larger society, and, as said above, we learn these roles from childhood. Therefore, we perpetually reproduce power structures, and learnt behavior. I doubt that fixing this on an individual level is sufficient to transform our interactions outside of small groups, families or work places. Although that would be a good start. We can see that the triangle holds together because the Victim, seemingly devoid of a way to handle their own needs, transfers care of their needs to the Rescuer, thereby giving up on their autonomy. The Rescuer is provided by the Victim with a sense of autonomy, knowledge, and power, that only works while denying the Victim their autonomy. At the same time, the Persecutor denies everyone else's needs and autonomy, and feels powerful by dismissing others. I've recently mentioned the importance of autonomy in order to avoid burnout, and as a means to control one's own life. If the Rescuer can acknowledge being in the triangle, and give the Victim autonomy, by supporting them with compassion, empathy, and guidance, and at the same time respecting their own boundaries, we could find even more ways to escape the drama triangle.