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Reiser

Hans Reiser Murder Trial: Indigent, Technospeak and Evading Detection

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Reiser

blog.wired.com: Jurors attempted, but couldn't bring themselves to take notes. The judge hid his head behind his hands. So continued the second week of the defense of Hans Reiser.

Psychiatrist in Reiser Murder Trial Says Heavy Computer Users Might Have Asperger's Disorder

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Reiser

blog.wired.com: A day after the Hans Reiser murder trial drifted into the netherworld, the murder case against the Linux programmer careened Thursday into the world of psychiatry. Beverly Parr testified that those who use a computer regularly "possibly" might have Asperger's Disorder, impaired social skills.

Also: Hans Reiser Murder Trial: Trance Music, Belly Dancing and the Minotaur

Hans Reiser's Father Doing Courtroom Pushups; Warns of 'Techno-Geek SNM Crowd'

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Reiser

wired blog: The Hans Reiser murder trial drifted into the netherworld here Wednesday after the defendant's father took the stand, at times rambling uncontrollably and apologizing for it.

Hans Reiser Murder Trial: The Vilification Defense Begins

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blog.wired.com: The vilification of Nina Reiser is commencing in earnest here at Hans Reiser's murder trial. After three months of the prosecution's case, Hans Reiser's defense opened Tuesday with verbal salvos portraying wife Nina Reiser as the not-so-perfect woman.

Nina Reiser's Mother, Defense Attorney Verbally Sparring

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Reiser

blog.wired.com: The trial of People v. Hans Reiser picked up here Thursday where it left off the day before: The murder defendant's attorney was sparring with the mother of the defendant's missing wife.

Also: Prosecution Rests in Hans Reiser Murder Trial; Defense Moves for Acquittal

Nina Reiser's Mother Calls Son in Law 'a Killer'

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Reiser

blog.wired.com: Nina Reiser's mother took the witness stand for the second day in the trial of Hans Reiser. She testified Wednesday that Hans Reiser told her Nina Reiser was a "bad wife."

Also: CBS Paying Nina Reiser's Mother $20,000 as Part of Trial Broadcast

Last Prosecution Witness to Take Stand in Hans Reiser Murder Trial

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Reiser

blog.wired.com: The Hans Reiser murder trial reaches a milestone Monday, when the prosecution is expected to put on its last witness -- three months after jurors began hearing some 50 witnesses here in Alameda County Superior Court.

Also: Nina Reiser's Mom Sobbing on Witness Stand

Hans Reiser Subject of New Play

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Reiser

Hans Reiser, Linux Programmer currently on trial for murdering his estranged wife, is now the subject of a local theater groups' play on the hazards of the technology field.

Nina Reiser's Last Phone Call Was to Hans Reiser on Day She Vanished

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Reiser

blog.wired.com: The phone call from Nina Reiser's cell phone was placed to her estranged husband, Hans Reiser -- the popular Linux programmer who is accused of killing her, according to testimony here Thursday.

Hans Reiser Murder Trial Refocusing on Nina Reiser

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Reiser

blog.wired.com: After weeks of forensic evidence and other testimony, the softer side of the Hans Reiser murder trial re-emerged here Wednesday when the 3-month-old case refocused on the Linux programmer's wife, who vanished Sept. 3, 2006.

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Android Leftovers

Widora TINY200 Allwinner F1C200s ARM9 Development Board Support DVP Camera, Up to 512MB SD NAND Flash

Widora TINY200 is a tiny ARM9 development board equipped with Allwinner F1C200s with a DVP camera interface compatible with OV2640 / 5640 sensor, an audio amplifier, and various storage options from a 16MB SPI flash to a 512MB SD NAND flash. I first heard about the processor when I wrote about Microchip SAM9X60 ARM9 SoC last month, and some people noted there were other fairly new ARM9 SoCs around such as Allwinner F1C200s that also includes 64MB RAM so you can run Linux without having to connect external memory chips. Read more

Open Hardware and Devices With GNU/Linux

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    To create the six nubs necessary to form Braille symbols, Joe topped solenoids with wooden balls. He then wired them up to GPIO pins of the Pi 3 via a breadboard.

  • Sending my alerts directly to the keyboard

    As I learned while making this blog post, custom drivers are not always the best way to add custom functionality to USB devices on Linux, sometimes there are pre existing APIs that can make adding functionality a lot easier.

    Despite me ending up not using a custom USB driver in the final version, it was still quite interesting to play around with, if for no other reason than I now have another trick up my sleeve for future projects.

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  • Onlykey review

    There’s a sort of soft rubber case around the key, you can get all kinds of colors (I just stuck with black). It also comes with the handy little carribeener to attach it to your keychain or whatever. So, once you have the firmware somewhat up to date, you can run the app. It will also update firmware as long as it’s not too old. The firmware is open source: https://github.com/trustcrypto/OnlyKey-Firmware On your first run (or if you factory wipe it), you have to do a bit of setup. You can enter 2 profile pins (sequences of buttons). They suggest that this might be ‘work’ and ‘home’, but you could use them for whatever you like. You can also enter a ‘self destruct’ profile pin, which wipes back to factory settings if you enter it. You can also tell it to do this if someone enters the wrong pin 10 times, but it will flash red and stop taking input after 3 failed pins. So to wipe it this way you have to enter 3 wrong pins, remove, insert, 3 more wrong pins, remove, insert 3 more wrong pins, remove, insert, 1 more wrong pin. You can also load a firmware called the “International Travel Edition” that has no encryption at all (it’s only protected by the pin).

  • Widora TINY200 Allwinner F1C200s ARM9 Development Board Support DVP Camera, Up to 512MB SD NAND Flash

    Widora TINY200 is a tiny ARM9 development board equipped with Allwinner F1C200s with a DVP camera interface compatible with OV2640 / 5640 sensor, an audio amplifier, and various storage options from a 16MB SPI flash to a 512MB SD NAND flash. I first heard about the processor when I wrote about Microchip SAM9X60 ARM9 SoC last month, and some people noted there were other fairly new ARM9 SoCs around such as Allwinner F1C200s that also includes 64MB RAM so you can run Linux without having to connect external memory chips.

  • Librem 5 January 2020 Software Update

    January saw development take off again after the end-of-year break, and following on from the Chestnut shipment of the Librem 5. Some of the activities below were already mentioned in their own articles in Purism’s news archive; others will be covered in more depth in future articles. This is just a taste of all the work that goes into making the Librem 5 software stack. You can follow development more closely at source.puri.sm.

  • ESP32-S2-Saola-1 Development Board is Now Available for $8

    Espressif ESP32-S2 WiFi SoC mass production started at the end of February 2020, and soon enough we started to find ESP32-S2 SoC and modules for $1 to $2 on sites like Digikey, but so far we had not seen ESP32-S2 development boards for sale. The good news is the breadboard-friendly ESP32-S2-Saola-1 development board has started to show up for $8 on resellers such as Mouser and Digikey albeit with a lead time of 8 to 12 weeks.

Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: This Month in Mutter & GNOME Shell | March 2020

During March, GNOME Shell and Mutter saw their 3.36.0 and 3.36.1 releases, and the beginning of the 3.38 development cycle. We’ve focused most of the development efforts on fixing bugs before starting the new development cycle. From the development perspective, the 3.36.0 release was fantastic, and the number of regressions relative to the massive amount of changes that happened during the last cycle was remarkably small. Read more