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Reiser

Jurors Shown 'Stuff Sack' Stained With Nina Reiser's Blood

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Reiser

wired: Jurors in the Hans Reiser murder trial for the first time in the three-month trial were shown actual forensic evidence -- a sleeping bag cover that was stained with blood from the missing wife whom the Linux programmer is accused of killing.

Criminalist Testifies That Blood Was Found In Reiser House

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wired blog: Jurors judging the murder trial of Linux guru Hans Reiser were provided a glimpse into the prosecution's forensic evidence -- trace amounts of "nice shiny red" blood found inside the defendant's house -- the last place his wife Nina Reiser was seen alive.

Hans Reiser Defense Priming Jurors for Closing Arguments

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blog.wired.com: A police officer on Wednesday testified here in the Hans Reiser murder trial that the Linux programmer was under heavy surveillance following the 2006 disappearance of his wife, Nina Reiser.

Namesys vanishes, but Reiser project lives on

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c|net: Namesys, the company run by murder suspect Hans Reiser, has fallen off the face of the Internet, but the file-system software it was commercializing is still under development by volunteers.

Foliage on Nina Reiser's Tires 'Consistent' with Leaf in Hans Reiser's Car

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wired blogs: A police officer testified in the Hans Reiser murder trial here Tuesday that foliage discovered on the tires of his missing wife's van wife was "consistent" with a leaf found inside a vehicle used by the defendant.

Hans Reiser Murder Trial Resumes After Three-Week Recess

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wired blogs: The Hans Reiser murder trial resumed here Monday after a three-week holiday recess. On the stand throughout the entire morning was Oakland Police Department technician Bruce Christensen.

Traffic Officer Says He Saw No Blood on Reiser's Car Seat

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Reiser

wired: A police officer testified in the Hans Reiser murder trial Tuesday he pulled over the defendant for a traffic violation nine days after the Linux programmer's wife went missing and noticed no signs the vehicle was used to dispose of a body.

Witnesses Describing Motive and Method in Hans Reiser Murder Trial

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wired blog: Week six in the Hans Reiser murder trial began Monday combining both motive and method, at least according to how prosecutors want jurors to see it, over why and how the Linux programmer's wife was killed.

Witnesses: Hans Reiser Acting Strange After Wife Went Missing

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wired blog: Two witnesses testified at Hans Reiser's murder trial Thursday they saw him acting strangely in the days following his wife's disappearance.

Nina Reiser's Best Friend Was Panicking: 'I Did Not Know Where Nina Was'

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wired blog: Nina Reiser's best friend took the witness stand here Wednesday at Hans Reiser's murder trial, reliving for jurors her emotional disarray following her friend's disappearance last year. "I was panicking. I did not know where Nina was."

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