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Obits

In Memory of Telsa Gwynne

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Obits

I can’t say that she was a close friend, but we knew each other since way back in time. She was a constant companion in search of good food and during several free software conferences, she and I took the lead of a group of hackers, finding them nourishment for the night and day ahead. So I was saddened today to learn that Telsa Gwynne has passed away.

My first exchange with Telsa was around Christmas of 1998. We were talking about Christmas gifts, and whether Alan Cox, her husband, wouldn’t like to get a nice printout of RFC-1149, the “Standard for the Transmission of IP Datagrams on Avian Carriers”. Little did we know at the time that Alan would later support a group of Norwegian hackers in actually implementing that very specification!

Telsa never had an easy time in the free software community. From the very early days when we started talking, she was frequently and repeatedly abused by people trying to use her to get to her husband. Over the years, she withstood harassment and abuse of almost any sort from people in the free software community. She got to witness first hand the darkest corners of our community and the worst kind of people anyone can ever imagine.

Some of Telsa’s contribution to the free software community before that included a lot of work on explaining GNOME to people. She served on the GNOME Foundation’s Board of Directors, contributed translations and wrote comprehensive FAQs about both GNOME and the GNOME Foundation.

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Remembering Nóirín Plunkett

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Obits

Our thoughts are with everyone who loved Nóirín, everyone who worked with them, everyone who went to their talks or learned from their writing, everyone who met them at a conference, everyone for whom they made the open source and technical communities a better place.

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Goodbye Marco

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GNOME
Obits

The GNOME project is sad to have learnt that Marco Pesenti Gritti recently passed away after a long fight with cancer. Marco made major contributions to GNOME, having been the original author of both the Epiphany (also known as “Web”) browser and Evince, the GNOME PDF reader. Besides his significant contributions and technical ability, Marco was known as a good friend who served as an inspiration to many within the community.

Members of the GNOME community have expressed their sadness at Marco’s death. Xan López, the current Epiphany maintainer, wrote: “I remember fondly working with Marco on Epiphany many years ago. His patience and good character were instrumental in getting me involved with GNOME and Free Software”. Another contributor, Tomeu Vizoso, said: “He reviewed my first patches ever to a free software project and his contagious enthusiasm was what put into motion my career in open source.”

GNOME wasn’t the only community that Marco was a part of: he also played an important role in the development of Sugar, a platform which focused on education and the developing world.

Our thoughts are with Marco’s family and friends at this difficult time.

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Mourning Marco Pesenti Gritti

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Obits

I unfortunately have some terrible news, Marco Pesenti Gritti passed away
last Saturday in London, after a long fight against cancer. He was with his
family and in good medical hands. He leaves behind his girlfriend Daniela
and 4 year old daughter Daniela. I had the chance to say goodbye last week,
and convey thoughts and support for his coworkers, current and passed.

I was lucky to have worked with Marco for many years at litl, on a very
broad range of projects, and had the chance to count him as a good friend.
He was the most passionate and dedicated hacker I knew, and I know he was
extremely respected in the GNOME community, for his work on Epiphany,
Evince and Sugar among many others, just like he was at litl. Those who
knew him personally know he was also an awesome human being.

We will try to help his family as much as we can. He will be sorely missed.

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Two hackers who committed suicide and no one still knows the real reason why

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Development
Legal
Obits

Two of world’s most wanted hackers had committed suicide and no one still knows why. Aaron Swartz and Jonathan James, both hackers by profession and most wanted by the FBI have committed suicide in face of the federal investigation against their hacking crimes.

Interested thing is both hackers were not connected to each other in any way but were being tried for hacking by the same department and the case was being overseen by the same Assistant United States Attorney Stephen Heymann. Could this have any hand in their suicides.

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Mourning Chris Yeoh

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Obits

It is my sad duty to inform the community that Chris Yeoh passed away this
morning. Chris leaves behind a daughter Alyssa, aged 6, who I hope will
remember Chris as the clever and caring person that I will remember him as.
I haven’t had a chance to confirm with the family if they want flowers or a
donation to a charity. As soon as I know those details I will reply to this
email.

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Debian Project mourns the loss of Peter Miller

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Debian
Obits

The Debian Project recently learned that it has lost a member of its
community. Peter Miller died on July 27th after a long battle with
leukemia.

Peter was a relative newcomer to the Debian project, but his
contributions to Free and Open Source Software goes back the the late
1980s. Peter was significant contributor to GNU gettext as well as being
the main upstream author and maintainer of other projects that ship as
part of Debian, including, but not limited to srecord, aegis and cook.
Peter was also the author of the paper "Recursive Make Considered
Harmful".

The Debian Project honours his good work and strong dedication to Debian
and Free Software. The contributions of Peter will not be forgotten, and
the high standards of his work will continue to serve as an inspiration
to others.

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Thank you, Seth Vidal

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Linux
Obits

redhat.com: Collaboration and community are truly at the heart of everything Red Hat does. Seth Vidal, a longtime member of the Fedora Project and Red Hat’s Fedora team, espoused these values and represented the best of open source. He was a lead developer of the yum project, the software package manager used by Fedora, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and other RPM-based distributions.

Seth Vidal, creator of “yum,” killed in bike accident

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Linux
Obits

durham.io: Seth Vidal, a long time Durham resident most well known for creating the “yum” software used by several Linux distributions, was killed in a hit and run accident last night near Hillandale golf course. He was 36 years old.

RIP Dennis

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Obits
  • maddog: RIP Dennis
  • Dennis Ritchie: The C man who booted Unix
  • Dennis Ritchie: the giant whose shoulders we stand on
  • Remembering Dennis Ritchie
  • A Few Brief Thoughts
  • Dennis Ritchie - A Roundup Of Tributes To An Unsung Hero
  • Computing pioneer Dennis Ritchie dead at 70
  • The Genius Who Made it Simple
  • The email I received from Dennis Ritchie
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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Wayland, RadeonSI, NVIDIA and More

  • Session suspension and restoration protocol
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    - The initial list of sponsors have been announced for the annual X.Org Developers' Conference (XDC2018) where Wayland, Mesa, and the X.Org Server tend to dominate the discussions for improving the open-source/Linux desktop. This year's XDC conference is being hosted in A Coruña, Spain and taking place in September. The call for presentations is currently open for X.Org/mesa developers wishing to participate.
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    Intel developers working on the GVT-g graphics virtualization technology have published their latest batch of Linux kernel driver changes.

Fedora and Red Hat: Fedora Atomic, Fedora 29, *GPL and Openwashing ('Open Organization')

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    - Back in early May was the announcement of the Silverblue project as an evolution of Fedora Atomic Workstation and trying to get this atomic OS into shape by Fedora 30. Beginning with Fedora 29, the plan is to officially rename Fedora Atomic Workstation to Fedora Silverblue. Silverblue isn't just a placeholder name, but they are moving ahead with the re-branding initiative around it. The latest Fedora 29 change proposal is to officially change the name of "Fedora Atomic Workstation" to "Fedora Silverblue".
  • Fedora 29 Will Cater i686 Package Builds For x86_64, Hide GRUB On Boot
    The Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) approved on Friday more of the proposed features for this fall's release of Fedora 29, including two of the more controversial proposals.
  • Total War: WARHAMMER II Coming to Linux, Red Hat Announces GPL Cooperation Commitment, Linspire 8.0 Alpha 1 Released and More
    Starting today, Red Hat announced that "all new Red Hat-initiated open source projects that opt to use GPLv2 or LGPLv2.1 will be expected to supplement the license with the cure commitment language of GPLv3". The announcement notes that this development is the latest in "an ongoing initiative within the open source community to promote predictability and stability in enforcement of GPL-family licenses".
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    The books on this year's open organization reading list crystallize so much of what makes "open" work: Honesty, authenticity, trust, and the courage to question those status quo arrangements that prevent us from achieving our potential by working powerfully together.

Server Domination by GNU/Linux

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HHVM 3.27 Released