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The Best Free Office Suites for Linux in 2018

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LibO
OSS
OOo

FossMint is particular about FOSS and related projects or partnerships. Sadly, though, not all the applications that are vital to certain needs fall under that category. Maybe someday they will but until then, potential users deserve the right to know about all their alternatives.

All the listed software are free to use with similar features to the ones in Microsoft’s Office Suite and even documents that are compatible with the same.

Some are desktop software while others are browser-based so you have the option to choose which one better suits your setup.

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Office Suites: OffiDocs, SoftMaker, LibreOffice, WPS Office

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LibO
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  • OffiDocs, the online Linux environment is a free cloud service to use desktop apps like LibreOffice and GIMP with a web browser

    OffiDocs offers you a complete service so you can work in the cloud with your Linux desktop apps. Thanks to this online platform, you can develop your projects from anywhere and at any time just using your Internet browser.

  • SoftMaker Office 2018 for Linux reaches beta stage

    The German software developer, SoftMaker, has announced the public beta release of its SoftMaker Office 2018 for Linux package. The Linux release comes hot on the heels of the Windows version of the suite which launch just a few weeks ago. Users can expect a re-designed interface which allows users to work with classic menus or ribbons. The company also touts seamless compatibility with Microsoft Office.

  • LibreOffice vs. WPS Office: Which Office Suite Should You Use on Linux

    LibreOffice and WPS Office are two common Microsoft Office alternatives for the Linux platform. There has been several debates as to which of these is the better alternative to Microsoft Office. The debates, surely, are not going to end anytime soon.

    There is no definitive answer here! The choice between the two is completely dependent on the user and the job at hand. LibreOffice and WPS Office both have their pros and cons. After sharing some pros and cons of each office suite, you will be better informed to make your choice should you get caught up in such a dilemma.

Apache OpenOffice: We're OK with not being super cool... PS: Watch out for that Mac bug

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Interviews
OOo

Apache OpenOffice 4.1.4 finally shipped on October 19, five months later than intended, but the software is still a bit buggy.

The resource-starved open-source project had been looking to release the update around Apache Con in mid-May, but missed the target, not altogether surprising given persistent concerns about a lack of community enthusiasm and resources for the productivity suite.

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Locked in by choice: why the city of Rome is championing open source software

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LibO
OOo

Five years after the European Union adopted a policy designed to free public bodies in Europe from proprietary software, government authorities across Europe are deeply dependent on Microsoft software and services.

However, some government agencies have managed to migrate to open source alternatives. Their projects are often difficult, temporary, and, carried out under the radar, in an attempt to escape lobbying both from Microsoft and other parts of government.

Rome is one of Europe’s cities advocating open source as a better alternative to Microsoft. City councilor, Flavia Marzano, argues that open source should start on the desktop with open source alternatives to Microsoft Office.

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News about the migration to ODF in Taiwan

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LibO
OOo

The migration of ODF keeps going in many different fields in Taiwan. Since 2016 the Ministry of Education in Taiwan entrusts the Information Service Association of Chinese Colleges (ISAC) and Software Liberty Association Taiwan (SLAT) with the task of promoting and migrating ODF/LibreOffice in universities in Taiwan. Among all the university, National Chi-Nan University (NCNU) is the earliest one, which started migrating LibreOffice since 2014 and has been working on it for three years.

Then on April 20, 2017, a student from NCNU posted an article on Dcard forum saying that, according to her teacher, NCNU “Will not use Microsoft Office anymore due to the budget issue. LibreOffice will be used to replace Microsoft Office.” The student strongly questioned, “LibreOffice is totally unknown to everyone. I don’t know what the administrative staffs of our school are thinking about. Microsoft’s software is a very basic skill for enterprises to recruit people. This decision will make students lost their core competitiveness.”

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Document Freedom Day 2017

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LibO
OOo
  • Happy Document Freedom Day

    It is with great pleasure again that we are announcing Document Freedom Day celebration. As we mentioned we gave people 1 more month to prepare for the event and run it on Wednesday April 26th so it’s today!

    DFD is the international day to celebrate and raise awareness of Open Standards. Open Standards goes beyond essays and spreadsheets and covers all digital formats from artwork, sheet and recorded music, email, or statistics. They provide freedom from data lock-in and the subsequent supplier’s lock-in.

  • LibreOffice in The Matrix [m]

Top LibreOffice Alternatives

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LibO
OOo
  • Top LibreOffice Alternatives

    More people than ever are enjoying the benefits of LibreOffice. It's free to use and open source. But what about LibreOffice alternatives? Are there any good LibreOffice Alternative sand should you try them for yourself? This article is going to share some of the best LibreOffice alternatives and provide links where you can learn more about each of them.

  • Ubuntu Tablet - quick test LibreOffice

    Ubuntu Tablet - quick test Libre Office in desktop mode tablet Bq Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition running Unity 8 bluetooth mouse + keyboard

LibreOffice and OpenOffice News

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LibO
OOo

It's time to make LibreOffice and OpenOffice one again

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LibO
OOo

Let's talk about OpenOffice. More than likely you've already read, countless times, that Apache OpenOffice is near the end. The last stable iteration was 4.1.2 (released October, 2015) and a recent major security flaw took a month to patch. A lack of coders has brought development to a creeping crawl. And then, the worst possible news hit the ether; the project suggested users switch to MS Office (or LibreOffice).

For whom the bells tolls? The bell tolls for thee, OpenOffice.

I'm going to say something that might ruffle a few feathers. Are you ready for it?

The end of OpenOffice will be a good thing for open source and for users.

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Rumors of OpenOffice Demise Exaggerated

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OOo

LibreOffice spun out from OpenOffice in the aftermath of the Oracle/Sun acquisition. It was one of many projects including Hudson/Jenkins and MySQL/MariaDB that got forked. To the best my knowledge while all those forks have strong user bases and have become the default tools in their respective domains - the original projects persist.

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Red Hat: Interview, Releases, Events, Compliance and Finance

Linux Foundation Expansion and Linux Development

  • Deutsche Telekom signs up as platinum member of Linux Foundation Networking
    Deutsche Telekom has doubled down on its commitment to using open source by signing up as a platinum member of Linux Foundation Networking. Earlier this year, the Linux Foundation put some of its open source communities, including the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP), under the Linux Foundation Networking (LFN) brand in order to foster cross-project collaboration. Mainly thanks to ONAP, the LNF projects currently enable close to 70% of all the world's global mobile subscribers.
  • Deutsche Telekom Joins The Linux Foundation, Deepens Investment in Open Source Networking
  • Samsung Galaxy S Support With The Linux 4.19 Kernel
    Just in case you have your hands still on the Samsung Galaxy S or Galaxy S 4G that were released back in 2010 as once high-end Android smartphones, they have DeviceTree support with the upcoming Linux 4.19 kernel cycle. The DeviceTree additions are currently staged ahead of the Linux 4.19 kernel for these S5Pv210 Aries based smartphones. With this code in place for Linux 4.19, the Galaxy S should at least see working mainline support for storage, PMIC, RTC, fuel gauge, keys, USB, and WiFi working in order.
  • Using the Best CPU Available on Asymmetric Systems
    This is the type of situation with a patch where it might look like a lack of opposition could let it sail into the kernel tree, but really, it just hasn't been thoroughly examined by Linux bigwigs yet. Once the various contributors have gotten the patch as good as they can get it without deeper feedback, they'll probably send it up the ladder for inclusion in the main source tree. At that point, the security folks will jump all over it, looking for ways that a malicious user might force processes all onto only one particular CPU (essentially mounting a denial-of-service attack) or some such thing. Even if the patch survives that scrutiny, one of the other big-time kernel people, or even Linus Torvalds, could reject the patch on the grounds that it should represent a solution for large-scale systems as well as small. Either way, something like Dietmar and Quentin's patch will be desirable in the kernel, because it's always good to take advantages of the full range of abilities of a system. And nowadays, a lot of devices are coming out with asymmetric CPUs and other quirks that never were part of earlier general-purpose systems. So, there's definitely a lot to be gained in seeing this sort of patch go into the tree.

Games: Risin' Goat, CorsixTH, Hegemone Pass, Unreal Engine

Software: Remote Access, EncryptPad, Aria2 WebUI, Qbs

  • Best Linux remote desktop clients of 2018
    This article has been fully updated, and was provided to TechRadar by Linux Format, the number one magazine to boost your knowledge on Linux, open source developments, distro releases and much more. It appeared in issue 220, published February 2017. Subscribe to the print or digital version of Linux Format here. SSH has been the staple remote access tool for system administrators from day one. Admins use SSH to mount remote directories, backup remote servers, spring-clean remote databases, and even forward X11 connections. The popularity of single-board computers, such as the Raspberry Pi, has introduced SSH into the parlance of everyday desktop users as well. While SSH is useful for securely accessing one-off applications, it’s usually overkill, especially if you aren’t concerned about the network’s security. There are times when you need to remotely access the complete desktop session rather than just a single application. You may want to guide the person on the other end through installing software or want to tweak settings on a Windows machine from the comfort of your Linux desktop yourself.
  • EncryptPad: Encrypted Text Editor For Your Secrets
    EncryptPad is a simple, free and open source text editor that encrypts saved text files and allows protecting them with passwords, key files, or both. It's available on Windows, macOS, and Linux. The application comes with a GUI as well as a command line interface, and it also offers a tool for encrypting and decrypting binary files.
  • Aria2 WebUI: Clean Web Frontend for aria2
    Aria2 WebUI is an open source web frontend for aria2. The software bills itself as the finest interface to interact with aria2. That’s a lofty goal considering the competition from the likes of uGet Download Manager (which offers an aria2 plugin). Aria2 WebUI started as part of the GSOC program 2012. But a lot has changed since the software’s creation under that initiative. While the pace of development has lessened considerably in recent years, the software has not been abandoned.
  • qbs 1.12 released
    We are happy to announce version 1.12.0 of the Qbs build tool. [...] All command descriptions now list the product name to which the generated artifact belongs. This is particularly helpful for larger projects where several products contain files of the same name, or even use the same source file. The vcs module no longer requires a repository to create the header file. If the project is not in a repository, then the VCS_REPO_STATE macro will evaluate to a placeholder string. It is now possible to generate Makefiles from Qbs projects. While it is unlikely that complex Qbs projects are completely representable in the Makefile format, this feature might still be helpful for debugging purposes.