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OOo

Ubuntu explains OpenOffice.org 3.0 decision

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Interviews
OOo
Ubuntu

tectonic.co.za: The Ubuntu team has decided that instead of OpenOffice.org 3.0, released last week, the default version of the office suite in the Ubuntu 8.10 release will be OpenOffice.org 2.4.1. It’s not a decision that many Ubuntu fans are happy with.

Why OpenOffice.org Failed – and What to Do About It

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Glyn Moody: Last week I noted that the release of OpenOffice.org 3.0 seems to mark an important milestone in its adoption, judging at least by the healthy – and continuing – rate of downloads. But in many ways, success teaches us nothing; what is far more revealing is failure.

OpenOffice.org 3.0 scores strong first week

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computerworld.com: OpenOffice.org 3.0 was downloaded 3 million times in its first week, with about 80% of the downloads by Windows users, an official with the group said in a blog post on Monday.

OpenOffice.org Base is No Microsoft Access Replacement

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eweek.com: The OpenOffice.org 3.0 desktop database application offers new features that make it better than previous versions, but it still lags behind what Microsoft Access offers. Among the key concerns is OpenOffice.org Base's limited filed support for Microsoft Access database files.

9 Must-Have OpenOffice Extensions

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makeuseof.com: Like Firefox, OpenOffice also comes with extensions that you can use to improve its functionality. Here, we have tested all the extensions and sorted out those that are useful for everyday use. Some of them are for general use while some are only meant for Writer, Calc or Impress.

OpenOffice 3 - Nice!

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OOo

dedoimedo.com: I have been using OpenOffice extensively for at least the last 3 years and seen many versions come out. In daily routine, people usually pay little attention to what new features their software updates bring, but when you look back and bunch years of continuous progress into a single, coherent thought, you get an impression.

Also: Openoffice 3.0 vs MS Office

Everlasting OpenOffice.org bugs

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OOo
  • Everlasting OpenOffice.org bugs, revisited

  • Microsoft: OpenOffice a bigger rival than Google
  • OpenOffice.org 3.0: The Big Yawn

The Forecast Looks Good for OpenOffice.org

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OOo

computerworlduk.com: As well as the stampede to the servers, what's noteworthy is the split by platform: around 79% of downloads are for Windows. That's good news, I think.

OpenOffice 3 Is Here. Can You Tell?

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OOo
  • First Look: OpenOffice 3.0 Improves Support for Microsoft File Formats

  • OpenOffice 3 Is Here. Can You Tell?
  • OpenOffice.org 3.0 breaks through 390,000 downloads in a day
  • 8 Reasons Why OpenOffice 3.0 Could Be The Tipping Point Application (or not?)
  • Getting The Word Out About OpenOffice.org 3
  • Reasons for the non-adoption of OpenOffice.org in a data-intensive public administration

What's new in OpenOffice 3?

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OOo
  • What's new in OpenOffice 3?

  • OOo: Thoughts about the importance of Extensions
  • Installing OpenOffice.org 3.0
  • How to Install OpenOffice.org 3.0 on Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex
  • OpenOffice.org 3.0 launch overwhelms servers
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