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OLPC

News: OLPC releases a farm version.

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OLPC

The One Laptop Per Child project, still going strong in 2015, provides a new version of the nearly indestructable XO laptop which is specifically geared toward children in farming communities.

The XO Tablet is an Android tablet designed for children 3-12 years old that brings OLPC's expertise to both the educational . It features a 7-inch screen and over 150 applications.

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Feasibility of desktop on ARM cpu

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GNU
Linux
OLPC

Thinkpad X60 is old, Core Duo@1.8GHz, 2GB RAM notebook. But it is still pretty usable desktop machine, as long as Gnome2 is used, number of Chromium tabs does not grow "unreasonable", and development is not attempted there. But eats a bit too much power.

OLPC 1.75 is ARM v7@0.8GHz, .5GB RAM. According to my tests, it should be equivalent to Core Solo@0.43GHz. Would that make an usable desktop?

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Related to: debootstrap, olpc, and gnome

After OLPC, does IT in education have a future?

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OLPC

Muzomuhle is exactly the kind of school that must have been in Nicholas Negroponte's mind when he launched the One Laptop Per Child project in 2005. And it's also exactly the kind of place which probably explains why recently rumours started to swirl that the project was winding down.

OLPC still exists, according to vice president of business development Giulia D'Amico, and will focus on software development. It's potentially a smart move — tablet computers that cost less than $100 are commonplace now and in South Africa, at least, it's relatively easy to find a business that will donate a box of low-cost computers to underprivileged schools in order to meet its corporate social responsibility obligations.

[...]

In 2013, however, the school took the bold step of going digital-only. All pupils — most of who are from the nearby townships — are now required to buy an Android tablet in order to study at Sunward.

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OLPC XO-Tablet coming to Walmart July 16th (maybe)

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OLPC
Gadgets

liliputing.com: The One Laptop Per Child foundation set out with an ambitious goal about half a decade ago, to deliver a $100 laptop that could change the face of education in the developing world. That never quite happened, but the OLPC team is ready to launch something a bit different… a cheap Android tablet from Walmart.

Dell ships XPS 13 laptop with Ubuntu

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Linux
OLPC
Hardware
Ubuntu
Gadgets
  • Dell ships lightweight XPS 13 laptop with Ubuntu
  • Dell releases powerful, well-supported Linux Ultrabook
  • HP Pavilion dm1-4310e: Swapping Windows 8 for Linux
  • OLPC cancels XO-3 tablet, downplays need for new hardware
  • Linux in Lilliput

Deathwatch: One Laptop Per Child

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OLPC

readwrite.com: One Laptop Per Child puts computers in the hands of the world's most vulnerable children to help educate them out of poverty. It's a noble cause championed by our brightest minds - but it doesn't seem to work.

OLPC's next XO generation to get new touchscreen

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OLPC

h-online.com: Educational initiative OLPC (One Laptop per Child), which attracted headlines in 2005 for its $100 laptop has announced the first details of its next generation of devices. The XO-4 Touch will use touchscreen technology from the Swedish company Neonode.

OLPC XO-3 Tablet To Be Shown At CES

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OLPC
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More in Tux Machines

Games: CLI, Tristam Island, GamerOS and Much More

  • Best Command Line Games for Linux – Linux Hint

    This article will list various command line games available for Linux. These games do not require you to commit a lot of time and can be played in short bursts. If you are using a lightweight Linux distribution with minimal UI elements or using a headless OS based on Linux, this list should be useful for you.

  • Tristam Island is a Infocom-inspired text adventure available on over 30 platforms | GamingOnLinux

    Okay, now this is quite impressive. Tristam Island is a text adventure designed like old Infocom works and it's playable across more platforms than you might expect. Developed by Hugo Labrande using modern, open source tools on Linux naturally it has first-class Linux support. However, it's also available on over 30 other platforms too. From Linux to Windows, Amiga to Spectrum and even some calculators can run it. The technical details of it are just as impressive as the adventure you go on. The developer also supplies the plain ".z3" file to run in your favourite interactive fiction interpreter. It could run pretty much anywhere. "After crashing your plane at sea, you end up drifting to a small island, with not much to survive. You explore, and find out the island was inhabited, years ago. But why did the people leave? And why is there a fence around the white house at the top of the hill?"

  • SteamOS-like couch gaming Linux distribution GamerOS expands with a new release | GamingOnLinux

    Need an up to date Linux distribution for your living room big screen experience? GamerOS can fill that gap for you while Valve sit on SteamOS. GamerOS is one of the easiest ways to get a full-screen Steam experience on a big screen, with no-fuss updates and a whole bunch of special tweaks to make it run as nicely as possible. Not only that, it has a bunch of extras to support other stores and platforms too. With the release of GamerOS 21 the standard components included have been upgraded like the Linux Kernel 5.9.9, Mesa 20.2.2, NVIDIA 455.38, RetroArch 1.9 and updates to their Steam Tweaks and Steam Buddy apps too. Their Steam Buddy is web-based tool you use to manage non-Steam stuff, with these release it expanded to support the Atari Jaguar and PlayStation Portable through emulators. It also now has audio controls, it will generate banner images based on game titles when one isn't available, fixes gamepads not working with the Epic Games Store and more fixes.

  • Cloud Gaming Services: Explained and Tested on Linux - Boiling Steam

    Here’s a quick test run of some of these game streaming services, and I’ll explain what they do. In particular, we’ll see how well each service fares on the desktop Linux side.

  • 340 or so days later and I am still lost in The Longing | GamingOnLinux

    Remember the unique mix of point and click adventuring with an idle game in The Longing? It's supposed to have taken people 400 days to finish and it released back in March 2020 - to which I was impressed with it. This is because when you start, a big timer at the top of your screen will count down from 400 real-time days. It's a painfully slow game, and one that's very much the anti-AAA shot some readers might be needing. It's all about loneliness, and the longing to know more and have more. It's such a thoroughly strange experience. The Longing sits between a point and click adventure with an idle game. You can walk around, interact with things and explore for a while. However, certain parts of it force you to wait. You might need something to grow or get broken before you can pass, or even just opening a big door might take an hour or two. You can just quit and come back, and time will continue on so you don't need to have it open.

  • Jedi: Fallen Order arrives on Stadia, six new free games for Stadia Pro for December | GamingOnLinux

    Google continues to boost their game selection with many fan favourites continuing to arrive on their Stadia game streaming service. They also have big plans. As of right now, Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order is available to buy on Stadia and it's 60% off at $23.99 / €27.99 / £23.99. The sale on that will end on December 3. They're also offering a free Stadia Premiere Edition (Controller + Chromecast Ultra) with pre-orders of Cyberpunk 2077 and I do have to admit I love the feel of my own Stadia Controller.

  • Re-live the experience of Half-Life with Black Mesa: Definitive Edition out now | GamingOnLinux

    Black Mesa: Definitive Edition is the final big update to the re-imagined fan-made Half-Life game, and it's looking pretty awesome. Easily the best way to experience the first part of Half-Life. Don't get me wrong, the original from Valve still has plenty of true charm but for modern audiences it's not the ideal way to try and get into it. Black Mesa (especially now with the Definitive Edition) makes it easier for a new generation to get invested into the crazy world that is Half-Life and experience the adventure of Dr. Gordon Freeman.

  • NVIDIA plan to support Linux with GeForce NOW using Chrome | GamingOnLinux

    For a while now you've been able to stream games using NVIDIA GeForce NOW in your browser, however it looks like NVIDIA will be making that a bit more official for Linux. Currently on certain platforms like Windows and macOS, NVIDIA have a dedicated downloadable application for their GeForce NOW streaming service. They expanded support into the browser for ChromeOS / Chromebooks in the Summer, which initially needed other platforms to spoof their browser string to ChromeOS but that hasn't been needed for a while.

  • Radeon RX 6800 Series 1440p Linux Gaming Benchmarks With 15 GPUs - Phoronix

    While the new Radeon RX 6800 series is suited for 4K gaming, a number of premium readers inquired about seeing 1440p gaming benchmarks for the cards. Now that all the initial launch coverage is out of the way, here is a look at the Radeon RX 6800 / RX 6800 XT with 15 graphics cards in total for this round of Linux gaming benchmarks focused at 1440p. Up for this comparison based on the cards I had available were the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060, RTX 2060 SUPER, RTX 2070 , RTX 2070 SUPER, RTX 2080, RTX 2080 SUPER, TITAN RTX, RTX 2080 Ti, and the RTX 3080 (unfortunately, the RTX 3080 remains my lone Ampere card at the moment with NVIDIA not yet sending out the RTX 3090/3070 for Linux testing). On the Radeon side is the RX 5600 XT, RX 5700, RX 5700 XT, Radeon VII, RX 6800, and RX 6800 XT. The very latest open-source Radeon Linux graphics drivers were used for this testing, which does incorporate the recent driver optimizations. Via the Phoronix Test Suite a variety of OpenGL and Vulkan test cases were conducted. The GPU power consumption and GPU core temperatures were also monitored on a per-test basis.

Sysmon – A Graphical System Activity Monitor for Linux

Sysmon is a Linux activity monitoring tool similar to Windows task manager, was written in Python and released under GPL-3.0 License. This is a Graphical visualization tool that visualizes the following data. By default distribution like Ubuntu comes with a system monitor tool, but the drawback with the default monitor tool is it does not display HDD, SSD, and GPU loads. Sysmon adds all the features to a single place similar to the Windows Task Manager. Read more

Kubuntu 20.04 LTS Review: The Familiar Operating System

Here's my review on Kubuntu 20.04 LTS Focal Fossa. Two years ago I call it friendly computing, now in 2020, I call it familiar operating system for everyone. We have so many good news with Kubuntu today and let's go, I hope you enjoy my review. Kubuntu 20.04 has a lot of benefits and a little of issues. I believe it is a familiar operating system most computer users can afford, by purchasing real Kubuntu laptops or by installing manually, you can push your computing for daily purposes, teaching and graphic designing quickly and comfortably. To complete everything, let's not forget it is a Long Term Support edition which will receive Ubuntu-based updates for five years until 2025 and desktop-based updates until 2023. Win-win solution, nice to everybody, that's Kubuntu Focal for you. That's my review. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to Access Google Drive on Debian 10

    Google Drive is a cloud storage and synchronization service that allows users to keep, synchronize, and share files across many devices. It offers 15GB of free storage space for each Google account to store files.

  • Keep track of multiple Git remote repositories | Opensource.com

    Working with remote repositories gets confusing when the names of the remote repositories in your local Git repo are inconsistent.

  • Merging and sorting files in Linux: Easier than you think
  • How to Administrate CloudLinux OS from Command Line
  • 5 Ways to Install IntelliJ IDEA on Ubuntu

    Here learn how to download and install IntelliJ on Ubuntu. Intellij Idea can be installed simply from GUI and also from CLI.

  • How to Install Htop in Centos 8? – Linux Hint

    Htop is more like an immersive Centos 8 system process viewer and device monitor. It shows resource-usage measures in color and helps you to conveniently keep track of the performance of your system as an enhancement. With both an additional array of choices and a clear picture on the board, it is the same as the standard main command. It shows details about the usage of Processor & RAM, tasks being done, average load, and uptime. Besides, Htop shows a list of all operating processes and can even show it in a tree-like structure. If you are interested to interactively control your device, then one of your best choices ought to be the Htop command. It runs on all distributions of Linux, and in most situations, is enabled by default. In this tutorial, you will learn to install Htop on Centos 8 using the command-line.

  • How to Install Steam on NixOS? – Linux Hint

    When installing things on NixOS, you need to have a package in the right format on the nixos.org web page. Steam is available, but some quirks may trip you up when you try to install it. You will hear more about this here. In particular, it is a non-free software package, so you must enable this option. You will also need to handle the ‘glXChooseVisual failed’ problem. The process will work one way in NixOS and another way on other distributions. It is more complex with just the Nix package manager.

  • How to Install and Configure Angular CLI on Linux Distributions

    Modern and dynamic websites require many features, menus, and widgets to make the website user-friendly and reach the perfect marketplace. No matter which tool you use to create your website, javascript is always required to draw the finishing line

  • How to Install and Use FFmpeg in CentOS 8? – Linux Hint

    If you’d like a fast way of converting between audio and video files in Linux and would like something that doesn’t chew on resources and does the task properly, then you may give FFmpeg a try. FFmpeg is vital for keeping some level of familiarity between files uploaded by multiple users, as well as help maintain your storage space under control. When using FFmpeg, you can translate, adjust sample rates, record audio/video streams, and resize files between different video and audio formats. It provides a collection of audio and video libraries that are shared, including libavcodec, libavformat, and libavutil. Whenever it refers to converting files, FFmpeg has several command-line choices, and it is also recommended to use it from the CLI. Follow me on, and I’ll lead you to install FFmpeg in Centos 8. FFmpeg is not offered in the default repositories of Centos 8. You may opt to build FFmpeg utilities from the source or install them from the Negativo17 directory via DNF. In this article, we’ll move ahead with the second choice. It is also the fastest way to implement FFmpeg on the Centos 8 OS.

  • How to Kill Zombie Processes on Linux

    Linux, of course, has to keep track of all the applications and daemons running on your computer. One of the ways it does this is by maintaining the process table. This is a list of structures in kernel memory. Each process has an entry in this list that contains some information about it. There isn’t a great deal in each of the process table structures. They hold the process ID, a few other data items, and a pointer to the process control block (PCB) for that process. It’s the PCB that holds the many details Linux needs to look up or set for each process. The PCB is also updated as a process is created, given processing time, and finally destroyed.

  • How to Setup a Firewall with UFW on Debian 10 Linux - Linux Concept

    Nowadays, a Firewall is an essential utility and property of any system for security; by default Debian Operating system having a firewall configuration tool named UFW (Uncomplicated Firewall). UFW is a user-friendly front-end tool to manage iptables firewall rules. It provides you more straightforward methods to manage iptables as the name of this tool start from Uncomplicated.

  • How to Use arping Command in Linux – Linux Hint

    To a network administrator, the ARP protocol may sound familiar. ARP is a protocol that Layer 2 devices implement for discovering and communicating with each other. The arping tool works using this protocol. Now, why would you need arping? Imagine you are working with a small office network. Using the classic ping command to ping hosts to verify their availability is very tempting, right? Well, if you are using the ICMP protocol, then you are actually performing ARP requests for probing devices in the network. This is where the arping tool comes in. Like ping, arping pings network hosts using network layer ARP packets. This method is useful for hosts that do not respond to Layer 3 and Layer 4 ping requests. This article shows you how to use arping command in Linux.

  • How to configure YAML schema to make editing files easier - Red Hat Developer

    YAML is a friendly data serialization standard that works with all programming languages. While configuration files are often defined in YAML, it can even be used as a programming language, like the workflow language at Google, or Apache Camel K. It has the advantage of not having any braces, making it lightweight visually. One of the drawbacks is that editing YAML files may not always be easy. For instance, writing a tag at the wrong indentation level can be hard to detect. To help with editing, it is possible to provide a YAML schema that can be leveraged by a large set of integrated development environments (IDEs). Unfortunately, this practice is not widespread. Consequently, users waste time searching for a missing or extra space and browsing documentation. In this article, you will discover the benefits of providing a YAML schema and how to make it consumable for all your users, making it easier to edit YAML files.

  • How to connect and share data between two Linux systems

    I got an interesting request (not from singles in my area). One of my readers asked me, how does one go about connecting two Linux boxes - I presume for sharing purposes. This is a topic I've touched upon frequently, but often indirectly. As Commandant Lasard from Police Academy would say, there are many, many, many, many different ways to do this. So perhaps it's time for a proper tutorial. I will show you several common, robust ways to have two Linux systems communicate over network. We'll do it on the command line, then move up to file managers, and finally, also perform a remote data backup using a friendly GUI tool. Let's start.

  • How to manage user passwords on Linux

    If you’re a Linux admin, you probably take care of any number of servers, all of which contain numerous users. Those users log in via various means or protocols, such as SSH, FTP, HTTP. In order to successfully log in, those users have to have—passwords.

  • Linux patch management: How to back out a failed patch | Enable Sysadmin

    A good patch management plan always includes a good patch backout plan.