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OLPC

OLPC XO-1

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OLPC

bunniestudios.com: I got an OLPC XO-1 a few days ago in the mail as part of the give one, get one program. Hopefully some child out there is enjoying their new laptop–there’s a certain amount of opacity in the process so I have no idea even if this laptop went to some needy far-flung village in a developing nation, as most of the propaganda would have you believe.

Negroponte turns up the heat on Intel

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OLPC

zdnet.com.au: Intel has denied claims made by One Laptop per Child that it broke a "non-disparagement" agreement and hit back at suggestions that it did not even contribute "a single line of code" to the project.

One clunky laptop per child

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OLPC

economist.com: IT WOULD be a stunt, but one perhaps worth performing, to write this column on the tiny, green and white, $200 XO computer from One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) that sits idle before your columnist. Alas, he cannot.

Also: Give One, Get One campaign raises $35m

Comparing the OLPC XO Laptop and Intel’s Classmate PC

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OLPC

gotoxo.wordpress: While browsing some XO-related web sites recently I came across a link to the home page of Intel’s new Classmate PC, Classmate PC, and did an investigation into the content.

Also: OLPC Considering 'Give One, Get One' Offer in Europe
And: Followup from Intel on the OLPC debacle

First Look: OLPC's XO Laptop

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OLPC

pcworld.com: To say the $188 XO laptop produced by the One Laptop Per Child organization is not your typical laptop is an understatement. For one, the XO is a tech triumph for its low price and rugged design, and will amaze any child in a developing nation (the laptop's intended recipient) lucky enough to get one. On the other hand, anyone familiar with a Windows-based notebook and who expects a similar experience with the XO will be sorely disappointed.

Is OLPC team crossing the lines?

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OLPC

thetechandcents.com: If OLPC team cannot demand that Intel would stop all their "competing with OLPC" programs, then by doing so they are crossing the line. I'm beginning to see sorts of weird "we're the volunteering for the poor, how can you compete with us? shame on you!!!" attitude.

Third World children love new laptops

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OLPC

AP: Doubts about whether poor, rural children really can benefit from quirky little computers evaporate as quickly as the morning dew in this hilltop Andean village, where 50 primary-school children got machines from the One Laptop Per Child project six months ago.

OLPC: Won't miss Intel's 'half-hearted' laptop effort

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OLPC

computerworld.com: Intel's resignation from the One Laptop Per Child Project's board of directors will have "no impact" on the group's operations, since the chip maker contributed little to the project since joining last year, OLPC President Walter Bender said in an interview.

Also: Is OLPC in trouble?

Lessons learned: Two weeks with the XO laptop

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OLPC

zdnet blogs: Repeat after me. The XO laptop from the One Laptop Per Child project is designed for kids. Why bore yourself with that mantra? If you don’t you may find yourself griping about something that wasn’t designed for you in the first place.

Also: How politics is stifling $100 laptop dream
And: What future for OLPC?

One Laptop Per Geek - A Review in Many Parts

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OLPC

opsamericas.com: So I decided to try an experiment, and participated in the G1G1 (Give 1, Get 1) program from the OLPC (One Laptop Per Child) project. At first glance, it looks like a very small version of the Mac clamshell laptops.

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