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OLPC

GNU/Linux Horizons: How OLPC May Impact the Future

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OLPC

Really Linux: The GNU Manifesto and the Linux kernel development are two important and unpredictable events that took place within the past quarter century, tightly coupled with the internet explosion. However, I propose that we are beginning a new phase of the Open-Source saga, a particularly bright phase, with the hardware development of the OLPC project.

Games Built From Scratch in Under 48 Hours

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OLPC

Digital Trends: The One Laptop per Child project is hosting Game Jam, an event where developers and others will come together to build free open-source games on a very, very tight deadline.

What If Every Child Had A Laptop?

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OLPC

CBS News: Nicholas Negroponte, a professor at MIT, had a dream. In it every child on the planet had his own computer. In that way, he figured, children from the most impoverished places – from deserts and jungles and slums could become educated and part of the modern world. Poor kids would have new possibilities.

'One Laptop Per Child' now reality in 1 South American classroom

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OLPC

Associated Press: The machines are the first in South America from the much-publicized "One Laptop Per Child" project, which hopes to put low-cost portable PCs in the hands of children in developing countries. Still in a pilot phase, the group has also placed machines at one school in Nigeria and another in Thailand.

One Laptop per Child on 60 Minutes, Sunday May 20

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OLPC

Red Hat Mag: Little green men often make the front pages of supermarket tabloids. Little green laptops? Not so much. But this Sunday, the XO (which we’ve been talking about for months) will get its mainstream news debut on CBS’s highly regarded program, 60 Minutes. (A far cry from the National Enquirer.)

One Laptop per Child official criticizes WiMAX community

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OLPC

EETimes: An official at the One Laptop per Child project criticized the WiMAX community on Monday for mainly focusing on equipment in the licensed bands, which will stymie innovation and stall a rapid decline in equipment prices.

Education, education, education

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OLPC
OSS

FreeSoftwareMagazine: I heard a phrase today that reminded me of my childhood: “...learning and sharing together”. I’m not sure if I ever heard this exact phrase, but it was definitely a theme that was central to my early education; it’s now a central theme of my life again, this time through free software.

Red Hat boss claims digital divide contributes to terrorism

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OLPC

ZDNet: The first keynote of the Red Hat conference here in San Diego kicked off with a passionate speech from chief executive Matthew Szulik who asserted that some of the blame for the terrorist threat that many developed nations are facing, lies with the fact many developing countries have been left behind when it comes to the digital revolution – particularly when it comes to education.

Also: Learning as easy as pie

$100 laptop dream may become nightmare

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OLPC

One of the most ambitious aspects of the "$100 laptop" project for schoolchildren in developing countries is the machines' open-source software platform, designed to be intuitive for kids.

OLPC project clarifies: no plans for Windows support

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OLPC

Late last week the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project had a media event in Cambridge, and while I couldn't make the event, I did tape a video interview for the BBC on the project.

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