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OLPC

This kind of Sugar is actually *good* for kids… Put an OLPC in your pocket with Sugar on a Stick.

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OLPC

A good friend of mine purchased an OLPC when they were first released. He wasn’t impressed with it, but I can’t say the same… Sugar on a Stick runs great on my old Eee PC 900, and is a lot more intuitive than you’d think, even for a grup!

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Dreaming Again with One Laptop Per Child

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OLPC

olpcnews.com: Recently I stumbled upon this article "One Laptop Per Child - The Dream is Over". Short sentences and big conclusions. A fatalistic view of OLPC. The dream is over? Great. Welcome to reality, and the reality is that many people from the OLPC community are contributing with nice results.

The OLPC XO-1.5 and Fedora 11

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Linux
OLPC

printf.net: Some good news from OLPC: we've decided to base the new XO-1.5 laptop's software release on Fedora 11. Unlike previous releases, we plan to use a full Fedora desktop build, booting into Sugar but giving users the option to switch into a standard GNOME install instead.

The Bittersweet Facts about OLPC and Sugar

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OLPC

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Recently, I had to fact-check some older articles I wrote about One Laptop Per Child in order to bring them up to date. This meant digging through the controversy in 2008, and what I found was some pretty appalling human behavior.

XO Laptops To Ship with Fedora or Windows XP

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OLPC

olpcnews.com: In a shift of strategy revealed in a Q & A from XO Camp, One Laptop Per Child will be dropping the Sugar User Interface in future XO laptop shipments for a version of Fedora.

OLPC no longer wants to change the world

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OLPC

itwire.com: There is more disquieting news emerging from the One Laptop per Child project - or what remains of it, following the sackings and budget cuts in January.

OLPC giving 5,000 laptops to Gaza children

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OLPC

masshightech.com: Just two weeks after announcing layoffs and salary reductions, One Laptop per Child is donating 5,000 of its XO laptops to Palestinian children in the Gaza strip.

OLPC days numbered as recession bites

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OLPC

itwire.com: The One Laptop Per Child organisation (OLPC), looks to have conceded that its "$100 laptop" has been a gigantic lapflop as the global recession bites deeper.

OLPC Just Got Gutted, 50% Staff Gone!

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OLPC

olpcnews.com: The official OLPC blog so innocently says that One Laptop Per Child is "Refocusing our mission" with an email from Nicholas Negroponte that clearly shows that the OLPC organization is really being gutted.

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Kernel: Virtme, 2018 Linux Audio Miniconference and Linux Foundation Articles

  • Virtme: The kernel developers' best friend
    When working on the Linux Kernel, testing via QEMU is pretty common. Many virtual drivers have been recently merged, useful either to test the kernel core code, or your application. These virtual drivers make QEMU even more attractive.
  • 2018 Linux Audio Miniconference
    As in previous years we’re trying to organize an audio miniconference so we can get together and talk through issues, especially design decisons, face to face. This year’s event will be held on Sunday October 21st in Edinburgh, the day before ELC Europe starts there.
  • How Writing Can Expand Your Skills and Grow Your Career [Ed: Linux Foundation article]
    At the recent Open Source Summit in Vancouver, I participated in a panel discussion called How Writing can Change Your Career for the Better (Even if You don't Identify as a Writer. The panel was moderated by Rikki Endsley, Community Manager and Editor for Opensource.com, and it included VM (Vicky) Brasseur, Open Source Strategy Consultant; Alex Williams, Founder, Editor in Chief, The New Stack; and Dawn Foster, Consultant, The Scale Factory.
  • At the Crossroads of Open Source and Open Standards [Ed: Another Linux Foundation article]
    A new crop of high-value open source software projects stands ready to make a big impact in enterprise production, but structural issues like governance, IPR, and long-term maintenance plague OSS communities at every turn. Meanwhile, facing significant pressures from open source software and the industry groups that support them, standards development organizations are fighting harder than ever to retain members and publish innovative standards. What can these two vastly different philosophies learn from each other, and can they do it in time to ensure they remain relevant for the next 10 years?

Red Hat: PodCTL, Security Embargos at Red Hat and Energy Sector

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #50 – Listener Mailbag Questions
    As the community around PodCTL has grown (~8000 weekly listeners) we’ve constantly asked them to give us feedback on topics to discuss and areas where they want to learn. This week we discussed and answered a number of questions about big data and analytics, application deployments, routing security, and storage deployment models.
  • Security Embargos at Red Hat
    The software security industry uses the term Embargo to describe the period of time that a security flaw is known privately, prior to a deadline, after which time the details become known to the public. There are no concrete rules for handling embargoed security flaws, but Red Hat uses some industry standard guidelines on how we handle them. When an issue is under embargo, Red Hat cannot share information about that issue prior to it becoming public after an agreed upon deadline. It is likely that any software project will have to deal with an embargoed security flaw at some point, and this is often the case for Red Hat.
  • Transforming oil & gas: Exploration and production will reap the rewards
    Through advanced technologies based on open standards, Red Hat deliver solutions that can support oil and gas companies as they modernize their IT infrastructures and build a framework to meet market and technology challenges. Taking advantage of modern, open architectures can help oil and gas providers attract new customers and provide entry into markets where these kinds of services were technologically impossible a decade ago.