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OLPC

OLPC Decision Not Final, RMS Asks: Can We Rescue OLPC from Windows?

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OLPC

groklaw.net: Richard Stallman just switched to an OLPC XO, for the free bios, and at that same moment in time, Nicholas Negroponte made some odd statements about Windows and the OLPC. Walter Bender's replacement has just been announced, by the way:

OLPC's Open Source Rift Deepens

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ostatic.com: The situation at One Laptop Per Child (OLPC), the organization behind the "$100 laptop," looks like it's going from bad to worse. At the center of the conflict appears to be the issue of how deep the laptop's open source roots should be.

Can we rescue OLPC from Windows?

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fsf.org/blogs: I read Negroponte's statement presenting the OLPC XO as a platform for Windows in the most ironic circumstances possible: during a week of preparing, under a deadline, to migrate personally to an XO. I made this decision for one specific reason: freedom.

This, too, shall pass, or: Things to remember when reading news about OLPC

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radian.org: It’s easy to get caught up in the doom and gloom over OLPC’s future. But keep things in perspective: they aren’t as bad as they seem.

It’s time to stick a fork in the OLPC

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blogs.the451group: Dana Blankenhorn yesterday called the OLPC project a failure for its inability to mass market a low-cost Linux laptop. Dana’s definition of failure, in this case, seems to be based on the quantity of XO laptops distributed.

Top OLPC Executive Resigns After Restructuring

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OLPC

pcworld.com: Drastic internal restructuring at the One Laptop Per Child Project has led to the resignation of one of the nonprofit's top executives from the effort. Walter Bender, the former president of software and content at OLPC, has left.

Also: Will OLPC Abandon Open Source?

Another XO review

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OLPC

thelinuxsociety.org.uk: The OLPC arrived home while my daughter was out and just before her 4th birthday. On seeing it she immediately identified it as a laptop, for children (as hers).

Falling in Love with the XO All Over Again

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blog.olenepal.org: I got involved with OLPC back in June of 2006. It’s hard to believe that was almost two years ago! Over the last two years this enthusiasm waxed and waned. It was only in January of this year that I really got to use the little device. At OLPC offices I disassembled and reassembled two XO’s. What fun!

13 phases for getting sugar: My odyssey to the OLPC XO

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screenage.de/blog: What a journey! It took four and a half month for me to get my OLPC XO. I had to wait four and a half month for the XO and spent at least 550 USD for it (400 for the G1G1, 40 for the delivery to the US, 100 for the delivery to Germany and 10 for a converter).

XO Laptop Review

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OLPC

ugo.com: The XO is about the size of a standard textbook and weighs a little over three pounds. It runs at 433 Mhz with 256 MB of RAM, 1 GB of flash storage and, not surprisingly, a free Linux-based operating system. It has three USB ports, microphone and headphone jacks, built-in microphone and 0.3-megapixel camera, and SD memory card slot.

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