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OLPC

News: OLPC releases a farm version.

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OLPC

The One Laptop Per Child project, still going strong in 2015, provides a new version of the nearly indestructable XO laptop which is specifically geared toward children in farming communities.

The XO Tablet is an Android tablet designed for children 3-12 years old that brings OLPC's expertise to both the educational . It features a 7-inch screen and over 150 applications.

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Feasibility of desktop on ARM cpu

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GNU
Linux
OLPC

Thinkpad X60 is old, Core Duo@1.8GHz, 2GB RAM notebook. But it is still pretty usable desktop machine, as long as Gnome2 is used, number of Chromium tabs does not grow "unreasonable", and development is not attempted there. But eats a bit too much power.

OLPC 1.75 is ARM v7@0.8GHz, .5GB RAM. According to my tests, it should be equivalent to Core Solo@0.43GHz. Would that make an usable desktop?

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Related to: debootstrap, olpc, and gnome

After OLPC, does IT in education have a future?

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OLPC

Muzomuhle is exactly the kind of school that must have been in Nicholas Negroponte's mind when he launched the One Laptop Per Child project in 2005. And it's also exactly the kind of place which probably explains why recently rumours started to swirl that the project was winding down.

OLPC still exists, according to vice president of business development Giulia D'Amico, and will focus on software development. It's potentially a smart move — tablet computers that cost less than $100 are commonplace now and in South Africa, at least, it's relatively easy to find a business that will donate a box of low-cost computers to underprivileged schools in order to meet its corporate social responsibility obligations.

[...]

In 2013, however, the school took the bold step of going digital-only. All pupils — most of who are from the nearby townships — are now required to buy an Android tablet in order to study at Sunward.

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OLPC XO-Tablet coming to Walmart July 16th (maybe)

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OLPC
Gadgets

liliputing.com: The One Laptop Per Child foundation set out with an ambitious goal about half a decade ago, to deliver a $100 laptop that could change the face of education in the developing world. That never quite happened, but the OLPC team is ready to launch something a bit different… a cheap Android tablet from Walmart.

Dell ships XPS 13 laptop with Ubuntu

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Linux
OLPC
Hardware
Ubuntu
Gadgets
  • Dell ships lightweight XPS 13 laptop with Ubuntu
  • Dell releases powerful, well-supported Linux Ultrabook
  • HP Pavilion dm1-4310e: Swapping Windows 8 for Linux
  • OLPC cancels XO-3 tablet, downplays need for new hardware
  • Linux in Lilliput

Deathwatch: One Laptop Per Child

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OLPC

readwrite.com: One Laptop Per Child puts computers in the hands of the world's most vulnerable children to help educate them out of poverty. It's a noble cause championed by our brightest minds - but it doesn't seem to work.

OLPC's next XO generation to get new touchscreen

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OLPC

h-online.com: Educational initiative OLPC (One Laptop per Child), which attracted headlines in 2005 for its $100 laptop has announced the first details of its next generation of devices. The XO-4 Touch will use touchscreen technology from the Swedish company Neonode.

OLPC XO-3 Tablet To Be Shown At CES

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OLPC
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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

Linux Kernel Space: eBPF and More (LWN Paywall Expired)

  • A thorough introduction to eBPF
    In his linux.conf.au 2017 talk [YouTube] on the eBPF in-kernel virtual machine, Brendan Gregg proclaimed that "super powers have finally come to Linux". Getting eBPF to that point has been a long road of evolution and design. While eBPF was originally used for network packet filtering, it turns out that running user-space code inside a sanity-checking virtual machine is a powerful tool for kernel developers and production engineers. Over time, new eBPF users have appeared to take advantage of its performance and convenience. This article explains how eBPF evolved how it works, and how it is used in the kernel.
  • Restricting automatic kernel-module loading
    The kernel's module mechanism allows the building of a kernel with a wide range of hardware and software support without requiring that all of that code actually be loaded into any given running system. The availability of all of those modules in a typical distributor kernel means that a lot of features are available — but also, potentially, a lot of exploitable bugs. There have been numerous cases where the kernel's automatic module loader has been used to bring buggy code into a running system. An attempt to reduce the kernel's exposure to buggy modules shows how difficult some kinds of hardening work can be.
  • Container IDs for the audit subsystem
    Linux containers are something of an amorphous beast, at least with respect to the kernel. There are lots of facilities that the kernel provides (namespaces, control groups, seccomp, and so on) that can be composed by user-space tools into containers of various shapes and colors; the kernel is blissfully unaware of how user space views that composition. But there is interest in having the kernel be more aware of containers and for it to be able to distinguish what user space considers to be a single container. One particular use case for the kernel managing container identifiers is the audit subsystem, which needs unforgeable IDs for containers that can be associated with audit trails. Back in early October, Richard Guy Briggs posted the second version of his RFC for kernel container IDs that can be used by the audit subsystem. The first version was posted in mid-September, but is not the only proposal out there. David Howells proposed turning containers into full-fledged kernel objects back in May, but seemingly ran aground on objections that the proposal "muddies the waters and makes things more brittle", in the words of namespaces maintainer Eric W. Biederman.

today's howtos

Graphics: Texture Compression, Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL), and AMD FreeSync

  • Unity Continues Crunching More Out Of Crunch Texture Compression
    Unity is one of the big public users of the open-source Crunch DXT texture compression library. While it's no longer maintained by Rich Geldreich / Binomial, Unity has continued advancing this open-source code to further improve the compression ratio and speed. For months Unity has been talking about their promising findings with Crunch. But this is the project that Rich Geldreich, the former Valve developer, previously expressed regret having open-sourced all of it. While he is on to working on better and more advanced technologies at his Binomial startup, Unity is working to squeeze more out of this open-source library.
  • Improving EFL Graphics With Wayland Application Redraws
    Under X, application redraws are tricky to do without tearing because content can be updated at any chosen time with no clear feedback as to when the compositor will read it. EFL uses some clever tricks to this end (check out the state of the art X redraw timing for yourself), but it’s difficult to get right in all cases. For a lot of people this just works, or they’re not sensitive to the issue when it doesn’t.
  • Improved Wayland Application Redraws Coming To Enlightenment's EFL
    Samsung's Open-Source Group has been working on making their Wayland support in the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL) even better. The latest Wayland work on the Enlightenment/EFL front has been improving the application redraw process. The EFL toolkit with the upcoming v1.21 release will now be hooking into Wayland's frame callbacks to better dealing with drawing, only drawing when necessary, and doing so without the possibility of tearing.
  • AMD FreeSync For Tear-Free Linux Gaming - Current State In 2017
    If you are thinking of gifting yourself (or someone else) a FreeSync-compatible monitor this holiday season, here's a look at how the AMD FreeSync support is working right now, the driver bits you need to be aware of, and how it's all playing out for those wanting to use this tear-free capability for Linux gaming.