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OLPC

News: OLPC releases a farm version.

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OLPC

The One Laptop Per Child project, still going strong in 2015, provides a new version of the nearly indestructable XO laptop which is specifically geared toward children in farming communities.

The XO Tablet is an Android tablet designed for children 3-12 years old that brings OLPC's expertise to both the educational . It features a 7-inch screen and over 150 applications.

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Feasibility of desktop on ARM cpu

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GNU
Linux
OLPC

Thinkpad X60 is old, Core Duo@1.8GHz, 2GB RAM notebook. But it is still pretty usable desktop machine, as long as Gnome2 is used, number of Chromium tabs does not grow "unreasonable", and development is not attempted there. But eats a bit too much power.

OLPC 1.75 is ARM v7@0.8GHz, .5GB RAM. According to my tests, it should be equivalent to Core Solo@0.43GHz. Would that make an usable desktop?

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Related to: debootstrap, olpc, and gnome

After OLPC, does IT in education have a future?

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OLPC

Muzomuhle is exactly the kind of school that must have been in Nicholas Negroponte's mind when he launched the One Laptop Per Child project in 2005. And it's also exactly the kind of place which probably explains why recently rumours started to swirl that the project was winding down.

OLPC still exists, according to vice president of business development Giulia D'Amico, and will focus on software development. It's potentially a smart move — tablet computers that cost less than $100 are commonplace now and in South Africa, at least, it's relatively easy to find a business that will donate a box of low-cost computers to underprivileged schools in order to meet its corporate social responsibility obligations.

[...]

In 2013, however, the school took the bold step of going digital-only. All pupils — most of who are from the nearby townships — are now required to buy an Android tablet in order to study at Sunward.

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OLPC XO-Tablet coming to Walmart July 16th (maybe)

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OLPC
Gadgets

liliputing.com: The One Laptop Per Child foundation set out with an ambitious goal about half a decade ago, to deliver a $100 laptop that could change the face of education in the developing world. That never quite happened, but the OLPC team is ready to launch something a bit different… a cheap Android tablet from Walmart.

Dell ships XPS 13 laptop with Ubuntu

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Linux
OLPC
Hardware
Ubuntu
Gadgets
  • Dell ships lightweight XPS 13 laptop with Ubuntu
  • Dell releases powerful, well-supported Linux Ultrabook
  • HP Pavilion dm1-4310e: Swapping Windows 8 for Linux
  • OLPC cancels XO-3 tablet, downplays need for new hardware
  • Linux in Lilliput

Deathwatch: One Laptop Per Child

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OLPC

readwrite.com: One Laptop Per Child puts computers in the hands of the world's most vulnerable children to help educate them out of poverty. It's a noble cause championed by our brightest minds - but it doesn't seem to work.

OLPC's next XO generation to get new touchscreen

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OLPC

h-online.com: Educational initiative OLPC (One Laptop per Child), which attracted headlines in 2005 for its $100 laptop has announced the first details of its next generation of devices. The XO-4 Touch will use touchscreen technology from the Swedish company Neonode.

OLPC XO-3 Tablet To Be Shown At CES

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OLPC
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More in Tux Machines

Security: Lustre, Aqua Security, Election Security and Reproducible Builds

  • Fix for July's Spectre-like bug is breaking some supers
    High-performance computing geeks are sweating on a Red Hat fix, after a previous patch broke the Lustre file system. In July, Intel disclosed patches for another Spectre-like data leak bug, CVE-2018-3693. Red Hat included its own fixes in an August 14 suite of security patches, and soon after, HPC sysadmins found themselves in trouble. The original report, from Stanford Research Computing Center, details a failure in LustreNet – a Lustre implementation over InfiniBand that uses RDMA for high-speed file and metadata transfer.
  • Aqua Security Launches Open-Source Kube-Hunter Container Security Tool
    Aqua Security has made its new Kube-hunter open-source tool generally available, enabling organizations to conduct penetration tests against Kubernetes container orchestration deployments. Aqua released Kube-hunter on Aug.17, and project code is freely available on GitHub. Rather than looking for vulnerabilities inside of container images, Kube-hunter looks for exploitable vulnerabilities in the configuration and deployment of Kubernetes clusters. The project code is open-source and can be run against an organization's own clusters, with additional online reporting capabilities provided by Aqua Security.
  • Election Security Bill Without Paper Records and Risk Limiting Audits? No Way.
    The Senate is working on a bill to secure election infrastructure against cybersecurity threats, but, unless amended, it will widely miss the mark. The current text of the Secure Elections Act omits the two most effective measures that could secure our elections: paper records and automatic risk limiting audits. Cybersecurity threats by their very nature can be stealthy and ambiguous. A skillful attack can tamper with voting machines and then delete itself, making it impossible to prove after the fact that an election suffered interference. Paper records ensure that it is possible to detect and quickly correct for such interference. Automatic audits ensure that such detection actually happens.
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #173

Android Leftovers

Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" Receives L1 Terminal Fault Mitigations, Update Now

According to the security advisory published on Monday, the new kernel security update addresses both CVE-2018-3620 and CVE-2018-3646 vulnerabilities, which are known as L1 Terminal Fault (L1TF) or Foreshadow. These vulnerabilities had an impact on normal systems, as well as virtualized operating systems, allowing a local attacker to expose sensitive information from the host OS or other guests. "Multiple researchers have discovered a vulnerability in the way the Intel processor designs have implemented speculative execution of instructions in combination with handling of page-faults. This flaw could allow an attacker controlling an unprivileged process to read memory from arbitrary (non-user controlled) addresses," reads today's security advisory. Read more