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OLPC

Pupils browse porn on donated laptops

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OLPC

Reuters: Nigerian schoolchildren who received laptops from a U.S. aid organization have used them to explore pornographic sites on the Internet.

OLPC official challenges Michael Dell

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OLPC

desktoplinux: Walter Bender, the One Laptop Per Child program's director of software, told DesktopLinux.com on July 13 that he invites Dell Computer founder and CEO Michael Dell to help figure out how to better use 125 million computers that are discarded annually because they are archaic.

It's official: OLPC and Intel become friends, collaborate

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OLPC

ars technica: The One Laptop Per Child Project and Intel have put their differences aside, at least for now, as Intel agrees to take a seat on the OLPC Board of Directors. The new "peace" between Intel and OLPC will also involve the project receiving some funding from Intel.

Magnolia native works to spread cheap laptops around world

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OLPC

Pine Bluff Commercial: Magnolia native Mitch Bradley is working on a project that could revolutionize education and society as a whole in the Third World.

2009: year of the dirt-cheap, $50 OLPC XO?

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OLPC

arstechnica: The success or failure of the One Laptop Per Child Project hinges critically on the cost of the XO laptop, which governments are expected to purchase on behalf of their citizens in developing countries. While we know that the XO will be debuting at $175, there has been renewed speculation of where the laptop project might land if sales are successful.

No OLPCs for Cuba or enemies of the US

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OLPC

tech.blorge: The US and Cuba don’t get along so well, in so far as it is illegal for US citizens to travel to Cuba. The OLPC (One laptop per child) was developed to provide cheap computers to children in developing nations. Cuba among other countries will not be getting them, ever.

GtkBuilder has landed!

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OLPC

Johan Dahlin: Today, after more than 2 years and 120 comments I could finally close #172535, adding support for loading interfaces created by UI designers in Gtk+.

Also: The OLPC project and competition

Inside One Laptop per Child: Episode 03

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OLPC

Red Hat Mag: Since piloting this video series, we’ve received lots of questions about the XO’s mesh network. How can these laptops “talk” to each other even without widespread internet access? How is the network they create different from the network at your home or office? Episode 03 explains it all.

Low-Cost Laptop Project Ramps Up Production

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OLPC

Chronicle: Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society kicked off its annual conference for college IT officials and Internet-law experts last night with an update on One Laptop Per Child from that project’s indefatigable founder, Nicholas Negroponte.

Thailand can't 'Just Say No' to laptop

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OLPC

bangkokpost: The organisers of a project to make cheap laptops for children at their governments' expense insist they still are negotiating with Thailand to take part in the scheme, even though the government has rejected it over and over.

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