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GIMP

GIMP 2.10.22 Released with AVIF Support, Improved PSP and TIFF Support

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GIMP

GIMP 2.10.22 is here to add support for the AVIF image file format, which is a variant of the High Efficiency Image File Format (HEIF) container but using the powerful AV1 compression algorithm. Importing and exporting of AVIF files is supported.

On top of that, users will now be able to import and export HEIF files, which contain both AVIF and HEIC formats, in 10-bit and 12-bit depth per channel. Furthermore, GIMP 2.10.22 enables proper importing of NCLX color profiles and metadata.

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Create transparency in your game graphics with GIMP

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Gaming
GIMP
HowTos

Whether you're programming a game or an app with Python or Lua, you're probably using PNG graphics for your game assets. An advantage of the PNG format, which is not available in a JPEG, is the ability to store an alpha channel. Alpha is, essentially, the "color" of invisibility or transparency. Alpha is the part of an image you don't see. For example, if you were to draw a doughnut, the doughnut hole would be filled with alpha, and you could see whatever was behind it.

A common problem is how to find the alpha part of an image. Sometimes, your programming framework, whether it's Python Arcade, Pygame, LÖVE, or anything else, detects the alpha channel and treats it (after the appropriate function calls) as transparency. That means it renders no new pixels where there's alpha, leaving that doughnut hole empty. It's 100% transparent or 0% opaque and functionally "invisible."

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GIMP 2.10.20 Released with Advanced Crop and More Filters

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GIMP

The latest release of GIMP is here with new features and more bug fixes. And it is immediately available for download for Linux, Windows, and Mac.
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GIMP Tutorial: How to Outline Text

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GIMP

Learn how to add outline to text in GIMP in three easy and simple steps with this screenshot tutorial.
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Learn the 37 most frequently used shortcuts in GIMP

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GIMP

GIMP is a fantastic artist's tool for editing digital images, especially with the bevy of impressive features in the recent release of version 2.10. Of course, like all creative applications, you can get working more quickly if you can make yourself familiar with the various keyboard shortcuts and hotkeys available. GIMP, of course, gives you the ability to customize these shortcuts to match what you're personally comfortable with. However, the default shortcuts that GIMP ships with are impressive and generally easy to get used to.

This cheat sheet is not an exhaustive list of all of the defaults GIMP has available. Instead, it covers the most frequently used shortcuts so you can get to work as fast as possible. Plus, there should be a few in here that make you aware of a few features that maybe you weren't aware of.

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GIMP receives a $100K donation

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GNU
GNOME
GIMP
  • GIMP receives a $100K donation

    Earlier this month, GNOME Foundation announced that they receieved a $400,000 donation from Handshake.org, of which $100,000 they transferred to GIMP’s account.

    We thank both Handshake.org and GNOME Foundation for the generous donation and will use the money to do much overdue hardware upgrade for the core team members and organize the next hackfest to bring the team together, as well as sponsor the next instance of Libre Graphics Meeting.

    Handshake is a decentralized, permissionless naming protocol compatible with DNS where every peer is validating and in charge of managing the root zone with the goal of creating an alternative to existing Certificate Authorities. Its purpose is not to replace the DNS protocol, but to replace the root zone file and the root servers with a public commons.

  • GIMP Picks Up A $100k Donation, Part Of $400k To GNOME Foundation

    The GNOME Foundation received a $400k donation of which $100k is heading to the GIMP developers for helping to improve their open-source image manipulation program that for some can compete with Adobe's Photoshop functionality.

A free photo editor worth trying: Getting started with GIMP

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GNU
GIMP

When most of us are looking for a photo-editing tool, we immediately think of Photoshop. Adobe’s program is powerful and popular, but it’s pricey at $100—and that's for the “light” version called Photoshop Elements.

Meanwhile, $20 per month is the standard charge for individual one-app subscriptions to Photoshop Creative Cloud. Adobe offers a free in-browser version called Photoshop Express Editor, but it’s very limited and only allows you to edit JPEG files.

A better free alternative is to turn to the open-source world and a popular program called GIMP. The GNU Image Manipulation Program is the standard photo-editing tool included or available to most Linux distributions. GIMP is also available for Windows (XP and up) and Mac.

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GIMP On TV

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GNU
GIMP

I was watching an issue of CNN’s “Forensic Files” early this morning when I was surprised to see GIMP on TV. A murder had been committed and the local anthropologist lacked software to compare a skull with a portrait to verify the identity of the victim. A local computer guru was able to use GIMP to compare photographs of the skull with the portrait. That set the police on a course towards solving the crime. It turned out the truck driver did it. DNA from a tooth compared to some surgical evidence confirmed GIMP’s conclusions.

What was interesting is that Forensic Files mentioned that GIMP was available to anyone for a $free download. I liked that. The software licence, GPL, described in generic terms the public can understand got out there.

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GIMP free alternative to subscription model Photoshop updated

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GIMP

That would be the oddly-named GIMP (acronym for: GNU Image Manipulation Program), an open source, high-end image editing and creation alternative to Adobe’s Photoshop and its now open-ended, monthly wallet-siphoning distribution mode for tasks like photo retouching, image editing and composition, and image authoring.

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You Say GIMP Was Right

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GIMP

The split was the result of GIMP’s concern over policies at SourceForge, primarily SourceForge’s use of DevShare, an installer for Windows that bundles third party software offers with FOSS downloads. In addition, the GIMP folks had reservations about potentially deceptive “download here” buttons on ads being served by the likes of Google’s AdSense.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by openSUSE (firefox and tor), Oracle (stunnel and xterm), Red Hat (virt:8.2 and virt-devel:8.2 and xterm), SUSE (avahi, gnuplot, java-1_7_0-ibm, and pcp), and Ubuntu (openssl).

  • Why not rely on app developer to handle security? – Michał Górny

    One of the comments to the The modern packager’s security nightmare post posed a very important question: why is it bad to depend on the app developer to address security issues? In fact, I believe it is important enough to justify a whole post discussing the problem. To clarify, the wider context is bundling dependencies, i.e. relying on the application developer to ensure that all the dependencies included with the application to be free of vulnerabilities. In my opinion, the root of security in open source software is widely understood auditing. Since the code is public, everyone can read it, analyze it, test it. However, with a typical system install including thousands of packages from hundreds of different upstreams, it is really impossible even for large companies (not to mention individuals) to be able to audit all that code. Instead, we assume that with large enough number of eyes looking at the code, all vulnerabilities will eventually be found and published. On top of auditing we add trust. Today, CVE authorities are at the root of our vulnerability trust. We trust them to reliably publish reports of vulnerabilities found in various packages. However, once again we can’t expect users to manually make sure that the huge number of the packages they are running are free of vulnerabilities. Instead, the trust is hierarchically moved down to software authors and distributions. Both software authors and distribution packagers share a common goal — ensuring that their end users are running working, secure software. Why do I believe then that the user’s trust is better placed in distribution packagers than in software authors? I am going to explain this in three points.

  • Sysdig Donates Module to CNCF to Improve Linux Security

    Sysdig announced today it has donated a sysdig kernel module, along with libraries for the Falco security platform for Kubernetes, to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) as part of an effort to advance Linux security.

  • Linux Foundation Announces DizmeID Foundation to Develop and Enable a Self-Sovereign Identity Credential Network

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the DizmeID Foundation and technical project with the intent to support digital identity credentialing. The effort will combine the benefits of self-sovereign identity with necessary compliance and regulation, with the aim to enable wallet holders with ownership and control over their digital identity and data access and distribution.

  • Linux Foundation Announces DizmeID Foundation to Develop and Enable a Self-Sovereign Identity Credential Network

Best Free And Open Source Photoshop Alternatives

Photoshop is quite synonymous with Graphics design nowadays, but it is not the only king in the room. Photoshop doesn’t come with a friendly interface for beginners. No doubt photoshop offers you freedom of using features quite independently, but everything comes at a cost. There are some other options too that are worth considering for users who are looking for open source and free photoshop alternatives. These free and open source photoshop alternatives are not only useful for beginners but also useful for professionals who are thinking of switching from photoshop. And the good thing is that these free applications make no compromise with the quality of work. So, what to do if you are a bit tight on budget and want to learn to design without paying the monthly subscription as in Photoshop. Well, I have prepared a list of free and open-source applications like photoshop to create awesome designs without compromising quality. Read more

RSS Guard Is A Qt Desktop RSS Feed Reader With Support For Syncing With Feedly, Google Reader API, More

RSS Guard is a free and open source Qt RSS feed reader for Microsoft Windows, Linux and macOS. The application can synchronize with services like Tiny Tiny RSS, Inoreader, Nextcloud News, and with the latest 3.9.0 version released today, Feedly and services supporting the Google Reader API (The Old Reader, Bazqux, Reedah, FreshRSS, etc.). The application supports RSS / RDF / ATOM / JSON feed formats, as well as podcasts using RSS / ATOM / JSON. Besides syncing with the online services mentioned above via plugins, RSS Guard can also add feeds locally, with support for importing and exporting feeds to/from OPML 2.0. The user interface is highly customizable, allowing users to hide various elements, add or remove buttons to/from the toolbar, and even use a vertical or horizontal layout (with the latter being great for ultrawide screens). A full screen mode is also included. Read more

today's howtos

  • Encryption at Rest in MariaDB – Linux Hint

    Encryption-at-rest prevents an attacker from accessing encrypted data stored on the disk even if he has access to the system. The open-source databases MySQL and MariaDB now support encryption-at-rest feature that meets the demands of new EU data protection legislation. MySQL encryption at rest is slightly different from MariaDB as MySQL only provides encryption for InnoDB tables. Whereas MariaDB also provides an option to encrypt files such as redo logs, slow logs, audit logs, error logs, etc. However, both can’t encrypt data on a RAM and protect it from a malicious root. In this article, we will learn to configure database-level encryption for MariaDB.

  • How To Install ERPNext on CentOS | RoseHosting Blog

    ERPNext is a completely robust ERP framework intended for small and medium-sized businesses. It covers an extensive variety of features, including accounting, CRM, inventory, selling, purchasing, manufacturing, projects, HR and payroll, website, e-commerce, and more – all of which make it profoundly adaptable and extendable. ERPNext is developed in Python and depends on the Frappe Framework. It utilizes Node.js for the front end, Nginx for the web server, Redis for caching, and MariaDB for the database.

  • How To Find Out Which Groups A User Belongs To In Linux

    A Linux group is a collection of one or more users with identical permission requirements on files and directories. An user can be a member of more than group at a time. In Linux, each group information is stored in the "/etc/group" file. In this tutorial, we will see all the possible ways to easily find out which groups a user belongs to in Linux and Unix-like operating systems. Finding out the groups to which a user account belongs will be helpful in many occasions. For instance, the other day I was installing Dropbox on my Ubuntu server. When configuring Dropbox, I had to enter my current user name and the group name. You could also be in a situation where you need to identify the groups a user belongs to. If so, use any one of the following methods to know what group a user is in.

  • How Do I Perform a Traceroute on Linux Mint 20? – Linux Hint

    Traceroute is a very useful utility that is used to track the path that a packet takes to reach a destination within a network. It can also act as a tool to report network congestion. In today’s article, we will discuss different examples that will demonstrate the usage of Traceroute on Linux Mint 20.

  • How do I Completely Remove a Package in Linux Mint 20? – Linux Hint

    The task of removing an installed package from any operating system can surely be a hassle if handled carelessly. It is because whenever you attempt to remove a package, you expect it not to leave any of its traces behind. In other words, you want a clean removal of the desired package. However, such a complete removal cannot be achieved without taking certain measures. That is why today’s article will be focused on the method of completely removing a package in Linux. Note: The method that we have attempted and shared with you in this article has been performed on a Linux Mint 20 system. However, the very same steps can also be performed on Ubuntu 20.04 and Debian 10.

  • How to Install Spotify in Fedora Linux – Linux Hint

    Spotify is a popular audio and video streaming service used by millions of people. Spotify is available for download on smartphones, tablets, and desktops for Windows, Mac, and Linux. Though Spotify works in Linux, this application is not actively supported, as it is on Windows and Mac. You can also enjoy Spotify on wearable gadgets. For example, if you have a Samsung smartwatch, you can listen to and control Spotify using the watch only. You need only install the app on your smartphone from the Play Store to start listening to tracks on Spotify. The free version of the application provides access to limited audio streaming services with advertisements. The premium service offers many features, including the ability to download media, ad-free browsing, better sound quality, and more. There are also other plans offered to specific individuals and groups. Spotify also supports various devices, such as Wireless Speakers, Wearables, Smart TVs, and Streamers.

  • How to Install Official Wallpaper Packs on Fedora? – Linux Hint

    Wallpapers are great for improving the user experience of any operating system. In the case of Fedora, one of its iconic features is the wallpapers it comes with. Every single Fedora release gets its own set of wallpaper, and these are some of the most anticipated components of any of its releases. In this guide, check out how to install official wallpaper packs on Fedora.

  • How to Reset Your Gnome Desktop to Default Settings

    Linux is a very versatile platform for not only power users, but also tweakers and tinkerers. With the rise of Linux desktop distros have come a whole new level of options for these users. Gnome is one of the most popular desktop environments on Linux and Ubuntu. The most popular desktop Linux distro now comes with Gnome out of the box following the shelving of Ubuntu’s Unity desktop environment. It, therefore, follows that there are countless ways to tweak your Gnome and make it truly yours.

  • How to Find Files Based on Timestamp in Linux

    The find command in Linux is used to search for files and folders based on different parameters. These parameters can be the filename, size, type of file, etc.

  • How to Delete Files Older Than Specified Days in Linux

    As you might already know, we use the rm command in Linux to delete files and folders. The filenames to be deleted have to be passed as arguments to rm. However, rm does not offer other options by itself, like deleting files based on timestamps. That’s the reason, we use the find command in Linux, which is used to search for files and folders based on different parameters. It is a complex command which can be used to search with parameters like the filename, size, type of file, etc. There is an option in the find command to search for files based on how old they are and today we will see how to use find and rm together to delete files older than the specified number of days.

  • How Can I Sudo Another User Without A Password? – Linux Hint

    In Linux platforms, a sudo user is a tool that implies “superuser do” to run various systems’ commands. A sudo user is typically a root user or any other user who has some privileges. To delegate important tasks like server rebooting or restarting the Apache server, or even to create a backup using the sudo command, you can use the sudo without having to enter the password again and again. By default, sudo user needs to provide some user authentication. At times, user requirements are to run a command with these root privileges, but they do not desire to type a password multiple times, especially while scripting. This is easily doable in Linux systems. In this article, we will check the method to sudo another user without entering their password.

  • How to configure Route53 with our DomainName to access a static website from S3 on AWS

    This article will help you with the steps to host a static website on S3 and redirect traffic from your subdomain to the static website on the S3 bucket. For this, you will need a domain purchased on AWS. Once you have the domain on AWS, you can create a subdomain and redirect requests from it to the S3 bucket.

  • How to install Zoom on Ubuntu, Lubuntu (latest version) using terminal

    What is zoom? Zoom is the leader in modern enterprise video communications, with an easy, reliable cloud platform for video and audio conferencing, chat, and webinars. You can use free and payed versios.

  • How to install mutliple Ubuntu VMs using Multipass on Ubunut 20.04 - Linux Shout

    Multipass is a platform developed by Canonical to launch and run Ubuntu virtual machines while offering a user the ability to configure them with cloud-init like a public cloud. Here we learn how to install Multipass on Ubuntu 20.04 Linux and use the same to launch Virtual machine instance. Although when it comes to launching lightweight pre-built virtual machine images with just a command, Docker comes to mind, however, Multipass could be another option for those who love to work on Ubuntu Server. Yes, if you want to launch Ubuntu Linux command line server VMs instantly on Windows, Linux and macOS then cross-platform Multipass is one of the good options to consider.

  • How to use the sipcalc Linux command line tool | Enable Sysadmin

    The only network numbers I can keep in my head are now and always have been a Class C network with a 24-bit netmask, such as 192.168.1.0/24. I know there are 254 usable host addresses available with a broadcast address of 192.168.1.255, a gateway/router address of 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.1.254 (depending on who's running the network), and a human-readable netmask of 255.255.255.0. That's my standard network. After all, 254 hosts are enough for any subnet, right? Wrong. A few years back, I had to step outside of my standard 254 hosts per subnet scenario when I decided to use a 22-bit netmask (255.255.252.0) to get a 1022 usable address space. I knew little about this address space, and it was frustrating to try to search for the simple information that I needed without scrolling through forums with all the idle chatter and off-topic rhetoric. I guess some people just need a space in which to air their grievances about everything. I digress.