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GIMP

Learn the 37 most frequently used shortcuts in GIMP

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GIMP

GIMP is a fantastic artist's tool for editing digital images, especially with the bevy of impressive features in the recent release of version 2.10. Of course, like all creative applications, you can get working more quickly if you can make yourself familiar with the various keyboard shortcuts and hotkeys available. GIMP, of course, gives you the ability to customize these shortcuts to match what you're personally comfortable with. However, the default shortcuts that GIMP ships with are impressive and generally easy to get used to.

This cheat sheet is not an exhaustive list of all of the defaults GIMP has available. Instead, it covers the most frequently used shortcuts so you can get to work as fast as possible. Plus, there should be a few in here that make you aware of a few features that maybe you weren't aware of.

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GIMP receives a $100K donation

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GNU
GNOME
GIMP
  • GIMP receives a $100K donation

    Earlier this month, GNOME Foundation announced that they receieved a $400,000 donation from Handshake.org, of which $100,000 they transferred to GIMP’s account.

    We thank both Handshake.org and GNOME Foundation for the generous donation and will use the money to do much overdue hardware upgrade for the core team members and organize the next hackfest to bring the team together, as well as sponsor the next instance of Libre Graphics Meeting.

    Handshake is a decentralized, permissionless naming protocol compatible with DNS where every peer is validating and in charge of managing the root zone with the goal of creating an alternative to existing Certificate Authorities. Its purpose is not to replace the DNS protocol, but to replace the root zone file and the root servers with a public commons.

  • GIMP Picks Up A $100k Donation, Part Of $400k To GNOME Foundation

    The GNOME Foundation received a $400k donation of which $100k is heading to the GIMP developers for helping to improve their open-source image manipulation program that for some can compete with Adobe's Photoshop functionality.

A free photo editor worth trying: Getting started with GIMP

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GNU
GIMP

When most of us are looking for a photo-editing tool, we immediately think of Photoshop. Adobe’s program is powerful and popular, but it’s pricey at $100—and that's for the “light” version called Photoshop Elements.

Meanwhile, $20 per month is the standard charge for individual one-app subscriptions to Photoshop Creative Cloud. Adobe offers a free in-browser version called Photoshop Express Editor, but it’s very limited and only allows you to edit JPEG files.

A better free alternative is to turn to the open-source world and a popular program called GIMP. The GNU Image Manipulation Program is the standard photo-editing tool included or available to most Linux distributions. GIMP is also available for Windows (XP and up) and Mac.

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GIMP On TV

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GNU
GIMP

I was watching an issue of CNN’s “Forensic Files” early this morning when I was surprised to see GIMP on TV. A murder had been committed and the local anthropologist lacked software to compare a skull with a portrait to verify the identity of the victim. A local computer guru was able to use GIMP to compare photographs of the skull with the portrait. That set the police on a course towards solving the crime. It turned out the truck driver did it. DNA from a tooth compared to some surgical evidence confirmed GIMP’s conclusions.

What was interesting is that Forensic Files mentioned that GIMP was available to anyone for a $free download. I liked that. The software licence, GPL, described in generic terms the public can understand got out there.

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GIMP free alternative to subscription model Photoshop updated

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GIMP

That would be the oddly-named GIMP (acronym for: GNU Image Manipulation Program), an open source, high-end image editing and creation alternative to Adobe’s Photoshop and its now open-ended, monthly wallet-siphoning distribution mode for tasks like photo retouching, image editing and composition, and image authoring.

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You Say GIMP Was Right

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GIMP

The split was the result of GIMP’s concern over policies at SourceForge, primarily SourceForge’s use of DevShare, an installer for Windows that bundles third party software offers with FOSS downloads. In addition, the GIMP folks had reservations about potentially deceptive “download here” buttons on ads being served by the likes of Google’s AdSense.

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GIMP Still Has Many Lofty Features To Develop

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GIMP

For those that may have extra time this holiday season to devote to open-source tasks, the GIMP graphics program still has many features they're after and aren't yet up to their v2.10 release.

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GIMP Magazine #4 is out!

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GIMP

gimpusers.com: Celebrate one year of GIMP Magazine! Issue#4 offers very interesting and cool stuff about GIMP and some really awesome photos!

Getting started with GIMP

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GIMP

beginlinux.com: GIMP – GNU Image Manipulation Program – has long been recognised as the premier Free Software package of its type. If you want to do serious work with photographs and you don’t want to pay anything (or you like your software free and open) GIMP is the first place to come.

Photoshop versus GIMP: the Empire Strikes Back

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GIMP

nicubunu.blogspot: My Photoshop course continues and in the classes where my homework was targeting the computer display my plan worked flawlessly: I used GIMP to do all the work and when done just saved as .PSD, I enjoyed the experience a lot. Now this strategy hit a roadblock:

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 5.3

  • Linux 5.3
    So we've had a fairly quiet last week, but I think it was good that we
    ended up having that extra week and the final rc8.
    
    Even if the reason for that extra week was my travel schedule rather
    than any pending issues, we ended up having a few good fixes come in,
    including some for some bad btrfs behavior. Yeah, there's some
    unnecessary noise in there too (like the speling fixes), but we also
    had several last-minute reverts for things that caused issues.
    
    One _particularly_ last-minute revert is the top-most commit (ignoring
    the version change itself) done just before the release, and while
    it's very annoying, it's perhaps also instructive.
    
    What's instructive about it is that I reverted a commit that wasn't
    actually buggy. In fact, it was doing exactly what it set out to do,
    and did it very well. In fact it did it _so_ well that the much
    improved IO patterns it caused then ended up revealing a user-visible
    regression due to a real bug in a completely unrelated area.
    
    The actual details of that regression are not the reason I point that
    revert out as instructive, though. It's more that it's an instructive
    example of what counts as a regression, and what the whole "no
    regressions" kernel rule means. The reverted commit didn't change any
    API's, and it didn't introduce any new bugs. But it ended up exposing
    another problem, and as such caused a kernel upgrade to fail for a
    user. So it got reverted.
    
    The point here being that we revert based on user-reported _behavior_,
    not based on some "it changes the ABI" or "it caused a bug" concept.
    The problem was really pre-existing, and it just didn't happen to
    trigger before. The better IO patterns introduced by the change just
    happened to expose an old bug, and people had grown to depend on the
    previously benign behavior of that old issue.
    
    And never fear, we'll re-introduce the fix that improved on the IO
    patterns once we've decided just how to handle the fact that we had a
    bad interaction with an interface that people had then just happened
    to rely on incidental behavior for before. It's just that we'll have
    to hash through how to do that (there are no less than three different
    patches by three different developers being discussed, and there might
    be more coming...). In the meantime, I reverted the thing that exposed
    the problem to users for this release, even if I hope it will be
    re-introduced (perhaps even backported as a stable patch) once we have
    consensus about the issue it exposed.
    
    Take-away from the whole thing: it's not about whether you change the
    kernel-userspace ABI, or fix a bug, or about whether the old code
    "should never have worked in the first place". It's about whether
    something breaks existing users' workflow.
    
    Anyway, that was my little aside on the whole regression thing.  Since
    it's that "first rule of kernel programming", I felt it is perhaps
    worth just bringing it up every once in a while.
    
    Other than that aside, I don't find a lot to really talk about last
    week. Drivers, networking (and network drivers), arch updates,
    selftests. And a few random fixes in various other corners. The
    appended shortlog is not overly long, and gives a flavor for the
    changes.
    
    And this obviously means that the merge window for 5.4 is open, and
    I'll start doing pull requests for that tomorrow. I already have a
    number of them in my inbox, and I appreciate all the people who got
    that over and done with early,
    
                    Linus
    
  • Linux Kernel 5.3 Officially Released, Here's What's New

    Linus Torvalds announced today the release of the Linux 5.3 kernel series, a major that brings several new features, dozens of improvements, and updated drivers. Two months in the works and eight RC (Release Candidate) builds later, the final Linux 5.3 kernel is now available, bringing quite some interesting additions to improve hardware support, but also the overall performance. Linux kernel 5.3 had an extra Release Candidate because of Linus Torvalds' travel schedule, but it also brought in a few needed fixes. "Even if the reason for that extra week was my travel schedule rather than any pending issues, we ended up having a few good fixes come in, including some for some bad Btrfs behavior. Yeah, there's some unnecessary noise in there too (like the speling fixes), but we also had several last-minute reverts for things that caused issues," said Linus Torvalds.

  • Linux 5.3 Kernel Released With AMD Navi Support, Intel Speed Select & More

    Linus Torvalds just went ahead and released the Linux 5.3 kernel as stable while now opening the Linux 5.4 merge window. There was some uncertainty whether Linux 5.3 would have to go into extra overtime due to a getrandom() system call issue uncovered by an unrelated EXT4 commit. Linus ended up reverting the EXT4 commit for the time being.

Kubernetes Leftovers

  • With its Kubernetes bet paying off, Cloud Foundry doubles down on developer experience

    More than 50% of the Fortune 500 companies are now using the open-source Cloud Foundry Platform-as-a-Service project — either directly or through vendors like Pivotal — to build, test and deploy their applications. Like so many other projects, including the likes of OpenStack, Cloud Foundry went through a bit of a transition in recent years as more and more developers started looking to containers — and especially the Kubernetes project — as a platform on which to develop. Now, however, the project is ready to focus on what always differentiated it from its closed- and open-source competitors: the developer experience.

  • Kubernetes in the Enterprise: A Primer

    As Kubernetes moves deeper into the enterprise, its growth is having an impact on the ecosystem at large. When Kubernetes came on the scene in 2014, it made an impact and continues to impact the way companies build software. Large companies have backed it, causing a ripple effect in the industry and impacting open source and commercial systems. To understand how K8S will continue to affect the industry and change the traditional enterprise data center, we must first understand the basics of Kubernetes.

  • Google Cloud rolls out Cloud Dataproc on Kubernetes

    Google Cloud is trialling alpha availability of a new platform for data scientists and engineers through Kubernetes. Cloud Dataproc on Kubernetes combines open source, machine learning and cloud to help modernise big data resource management. The alpha availability will first start with workloads on Apache Spark, with more environments to come.

  • Google announces alpha of Cloud Dataproc for Kubernetes

    Not surprisingly, Google, the company that created K8s, thinks the answer to that question is yes. And so, today, the company is announcing the Alpha release of Cloud Dataproc for Kubernetes (K8s Dataproc), allowing Spark to run directly on Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE)-based K8s clusters. The service promises to reduce complexity, in terms of open source data components' inter-dependencies, and portability of Spark applications. That should allow data engineers, analytics experts and data scientists to run their Spark workloads in a streamlined way, with less integration and versioning hassles.

IBM/Red Hat: Fedora's Power Architecture Builds, WebSphere/WebLogic's Demise, Red Hat’s David Egts

  • Fedora Is Beginning To Spin Workstation & Live Images For POWER

    If you are running the likes of the Raptor Blackbird for a POWER open-source desktop and wanting to run Fedora on it, currently you need to use the Fedora "server" CLI installer and from there install the desired packages for a desktop. But moving forward, Fedora is beginning to spin Workstation and Live images for PPC64LE. Complementing Fedora's Power Architecture images of Fedora Everything and Fedora Server, Workstation and Live images are being assembled. This is much more convenient for those wanting an IBM POWER Linux desktop thanks to the success of the Raptor Blackbird with most Linux distributions just offering the server/CLI (non-desktop) images by default for PPC64LE.

  • Are Application Servers Dying a Slow Death?

    There has been concern for nearly five years application servers are dead. Truth be told, they are not dead, but is their usage in decline? The simple answer is yes. Over the years, it appears corporate environments have decided the "return on investment" is not there when looking at Java application servers. On the surface, one might assume that the likes of WebSphere or WebLogic might be the ones in decline due to cost. Perhaps it is just affecting the proprietary choices, while their open source based derivatives are growing or remaining steady? Appears not. Whichever Java application server you choose, all of them are in a state of decline. Whether it be proprietary options such as WebSphere or WebLogic, or open source alternatives JBoss or Tomcat, all are in decline based on employment listings we review. However, they are not declining at the same pace. From our collection of data, WebSphere and WebLogic's decline has been more muted. The rate of reduction for each of these application servers is in the neighborhood of 25-35% over the last couple years. At the same time, the likes of JBoss and Tomcat have declined around 40-45%. Not a drastic difference, but one that still is notable.

  • Red Hat’s David Egts: Commercial Open Source Software to Drive Federal IT Modernization

    David Egts, chief technologist for Red Hat’s (NYSE: RHT) North American public sector division, advises federal agencies to adopt commercial open source software to help advance their information technology modernization efforts, GovCon Wire reported Aug. 23. He said Aug. 22 in an FCW thought piece that agencies should seek software vendors that are well-versed in open source technology as well as government security certifications in order to successfully modernize federal IT processes.

GNOME and gestures, Part 2: HdyLeaflet

A folded HdyLeaflet, just like GtkStack, shows one of its children at any given moment, even during child transitions. The second visible child during transitions is just a screenshot. But which child is “real” and which is a screenshot? Turns out the real child is the destination one, meaning the widget switches its visible child when the animation starts. It isn’t a problem if the animation is quick and time-based, but becomes very noticeable with a gesture. Additionally, it means that starting and cancelling a gesture switches the visible child two time. One solution would be only switching the visible child at the end of the animation (or not at all if it was canceled). The problem is that it’s a major behavior change: applications that listen to visible-child to know when to update the widgets, or sync the property between two leaflets will break. Another solution would be to draw both children during transitions, but it still means that visible-child changes two times if the gesture was canceled. The problem here is similar: applications wouldn’t expect the other child to still be drawn, but at least it’s just a visual breakage. And it still means that starting and canceling the gesture would mean two visible-child changes. The second solution may sound better, and yet the current WIP code uses the first one. Read more