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LibO

Productivity Software/LibreOffice

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LibO
  • My todo list for LibreOffice 6.4

    LibreOffice 6.3 isn’t release but I have already plans for the 6.4 winter release.

  • LibreWaterloo: Building the LibreOffice community in Canada

    If you’ve seen our LibreOffice contributor map, you’ll note that we have a few community members in north America. (Of course, the map doesn’t show absolutely everyone in the LibreOffice project – just people we’ve interviewed recently.) So we want to grow this community! 

  • OnlyOffice, an Open Source Office Suite for Windows, MacOS & Linux, Gets Updated

    A veritable surfeit of office suites have seen updates this past month, including WPS Office, SoftMaker Office 2018 and FreeOffice. Clearly not wanting to be left out, OnlyOffice has issued a new update too.

    OnlyOffice – which is supposed to be styled ONLYOFFICE, but I find that a bit too shouty – is a free, open-source office suite for Windows, macOS and (of course) Linux.

Annual Report 2018: LibreOffice development

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LibO

Throughout the second half of 2018, the developer community worked on a new major release: LibreOffice 6.2. Details about the end-user-facing new features are provided on this page, and in the following video – so in the rest of this blog post, we’ll focus on developer-related changes.

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What is the Open Document Format (ODF), and how is it developed?

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LibO
OSS

Open Document Format is LibreOffice’s native file format. (If you have a file with a .odt, .ods, .odp or .odg extension, then it’s an Open Document Text, Spreadsheet or Presentation file or Graphic respectively.)

ODF is developed by OASIS, then submitted to ISO (the International Organization for Standardization), and then adopted as a standard. There is also a working group at ISO, which by the way also works on OOXML – which can then ask questions about development, and so on.

For ODF we are now working on version 1.3. We had a “feature freeze” last summer. We have come so far that everything we wanted to have in it is available in the “editor version”. Now we’re going to fine-tune it, then we’ll be back in summer – so that was a whole year. Then comes the coordination process at OASIS, so it usually takes two years until a new version of the standard is ready.

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LibreOffice 6.3 RC1 is ready for testing!

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The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce LibreOffice 6.3 RC1 is ready for testing!

LibreOffice 6.3 will be released as final in mid August, 2019, being LibreOffice 6.3 RC1 the forth pre-release since the development of version 6.3 started in mid November, 2018 ( See the release plan ). Since LibreOffice 6.3 Beta2 ( the previous pre-release ), 123 commits have been submitted to the code repository and 66 bugs have been fixed. Check the release notes to find the new features included in this version of LibreOffice.

LibreOffice 6.3 RC1 can be downloaded from here, it’s available for Linux, MacOS and Windows. ( Note tha it will replace your actual installation )

In case you find any problem in this pre-release, please report it in Bugzilla ( You just need a legit email address in order to create a new account ) so it can get fixed before LibreOffice 6.3 final is released.

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The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.2.5

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LibO

The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.2.5, the fifth bug and regression fixing release of the LibreOffice 6.2 family, targeted at tech-savvy individuals: early adopters, technology enthusiasts and power users. Users in production environments can start evaluating LibreOffice 6.2.5.

LibreOffice’s individual users are helped by a global community of volunteers: https://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/community-support/. On the website and the wiki there are guides, manuals, tutorials and HowTos. Donations help us to make all of these resources available.

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The COSM Project

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LibO
OOo

In 2017, contributors to the Open Document Format (ODF) specification at OASIS (Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards) noted that while the Technical Committee continues to generate changes, the integration of these changes – a substantial task, which is key for the future of the ODF standard – is only being conducted on a volunteer basis.

To support current adoptions of the ODF standard format by governments and enterprises and potential adoptions in the future, it would have been important to release the new ODF 1.3 version in a timely manner, to avoid that delays could affect the position of ODF in the marketplace.

Open Document Format 1.0 was published as an ISO/IEC international standard ISO/IEC 26300 – Open Document Format for Office Applications in 2006. Open Document Format 1.2 was published as ISO/IEC standard in 2015.

In early 2018, the Board of Directors of The Document Foundation addressed the need of evolving the standard by establishing the independent COSM – Community of ODF Specification Maintainers – project at Public Software CIC (a UK Community Interest Company) to hold funds and to retain editors to work at the Technical Committee.

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OSS: TODO Group at OSI, Open Source Sees Donations Blocked, Mozilla Wants Web Regulation, LibreOffice GSoC Report and WordPress Chrome Extensions That You Should Try

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Moz/FF
OSS
  • Open Source Initiative Welcomes TODO Group as Affiliate Member

    The Open Source Initiative ® (OSI), the non-profit corporation with global scope formed to educate about and advocate for the benefits of open source and to build bridges among different constituencies in the open source community, announced today the affiliate membership of TODO Group. Boasting membership from some of today's most active corporations working in and with Open Source Software, the TODO Group shares experiences, develops best practices, and collaborates around common tooling to address some of the most common challenges related to open source program management, development, deployment, and management.

    As Open Source Software continues its growth into and across corporate infrastructure, more and more companies are seeking peers and partners to help understand, not only "the value of open source" but "the open source ethos" as well. Businesses across industries--not just technology--use, contribute to, and maintain, thousands of open source projects, both large and small. Despite open source's twenty year history, many of these programs face challenges in ensuring high-quality and frequent releases, engaging with developer communities, and contributing back to other projects effectively. Here, as a resource to those seeking authentic engagement with open source communities of practice, the OSI and TODO Group will work together, helping organizations identify potential projects, assess community alignment, and participate credibly and reliably to foster success.

  • I am sorry, we are unable to accept donations right now

    About two weeks ago, an attacker tried to use presumably stolen credit card information on our donation form. He was able to try around 300 different numbers in only a few hours before we noticed this and tried to block him. We consulted with the technical support hotline of our payment provider.

    Unfortunately, the risk department decided to disable our account at the same time before we could implement some better protection against fraud like this and was not able to contact us about it. After endless calls with them and lots and lots of promises about being called back, I was finally able to get hold of someone who told me that they are no longer able to provide their services to us - without any specific reason.

    This is not the first time that an open source project has been fallen victim to being cut off of their payments and it is indeed threatening to the existence of all those projects. Now it seems to be our turn.

    To not go too much into detail, this seems to be a case of that our payment provider terminated our contract because of one simple reason: They do not know what an Open Source project is and how donations work. The concept does not seem to be anything that they can understand or are willing to learn. It would have helped us to know this when we set up our donations system with them, but unfortunately we could not foresee this.

    Some parts of the banking business in Germany really seems to be living in the eighteen-hundreds. The Germans being people who overwhelmingly prefer to pay things in cash, this does not come as a surprise. As a tourist I can only recommend to bring some cash to wherever you go or you won't be able to pay. Something that works the other way round in our neighbouring countries or elsewhere. Credit cards work everywhere.

  • Building on the UK white paper: How to better protect internet openness and individuals’ rights in the fight against online harms

    In April 2019 the UK government unveiled plans for sweeping new laws aimed at tackling illegal and harmful content and activity online, described by the government as ‘the toughest internet laws in the world’. While the UK government’s proposal contains some interesting avenues of exploration for the next generation of European content regulation laws, it also includes several critical weaknesses and grey areas. We’ve just filed comments with the government that spell out the key areas of concern and provide recommendations on how to address them.

    The UK government’s white paper responds to legitimate public policy concerns around how technology companies deal with illegal and harmful content online. We understand that in many respects the current European regulatory paradigm is not fit for purpose, and we support an exploration of what codified content ‘responsibility’ might look like in the UK and at EU-level, while ensuring strong and clear protections for individuals’ free expression and due process rights.

  • [LibreOffice GSoC] Week 5 Report

    At week 4 I have finished the first phase of the new UI logger which was the grammar and the new sentences of the log messages and rewrite all the log statement with the new grammar.

    This week I have started the implementation of the Compiler of the new logger grammar. This Compiler is responsible for taking the log file with the new grammar and generate a UI test case that performs the same as the user actions.

  • 12 Best WordPress Chrome Extensions That You Should Try

    Google Chrome browser is currently the most widely used desktop browser and it comes with hundreds of extensions to ease your work. In one of our previous articles, we discussed 25 best chrome extensions for productivity.

    Here keeping in mind the usage of WordPress users, we are listing out the 12 Best Chrome Extensions for WordPress that you should try and have been suggested by our experts. If you are currently building a website, these extensions are sure to make your life easy!

LibreOffice's LibOCon and SUSE's openSUSE.Asia

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LibO
SUSE
  • LibOCon Almeria Call for Papers New Deadline

    Call for Papers deadline for LibOCon Almeria, in Spain, has been extended to July 15, 2019. The event is scheduled for early September, from Wednesday 11 to Friday 13.

    Whether you are a seasoned presenter or have never spoken in public before, we want to hear from you! So, if you have not yet submitted your talk proposal and have something interesting to share about LibreOffice or the Document Liberation Project, you still have time to act!

  • openSUSE.Asia Summit 2020: Call for Host

    The openSUSE.Asia Summit is the largest annual openSUSE conference in Asia, attended by contributors and enthusiasts from all over Asia. The event focuses primarily on the openSUSE distribution, its applications for personal and enterprise use, and open source culture. It brings together the openSUSE community in Asia, providing a forum for users, developers, foundation leaders, governments and businesses to discuss the present technology and future developments.

    The Summit’s preference is to find new locations each year as we spread openSUSE throughout Asia, and we are looking for local organizers to rise to the challenge of organizing an excellent openSUSE event in 2020. We need individuals and communities to get together and organize a successful openSUSE.Asia Summit. The openSUSE.Asia organization committee assists throughout the process.

LibreOffice: “Tip-Of-The-Day” (Design), LibreOffice Quality Assurance and LibreOffice Appliances

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LibO
  • Easyhacking: How to create a new “Tip-Of-The-Day” dialog

    LibreOffice is an application with a large number of expert features, and though aimed to be easy to use there are always surprising shortcuts to achieve a goal. We post every day a tip on Twitter, and with the upcoming release 6.3 there will be also a tip-of-the-day messagebox when you start the program. This post aims to show how such a simple messagebox can be implemented (the complete patch is here).

  • bibisect-win64-6.4 is available for cloning!

    The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce the bisect repository from libreoffice-6-3-branch-point to latest master for Windows is available for cloning at Gerrit. As a novelty, it’s the first time the bisect repository for Windows is built for 64 bits instead of 32 as in previous repositories. Future repositories will be built for 64 bits as well.

  • LibreOffice Appliances project (GSoC 2019)

    So I finally managed to build LibreOffice for armv7 and I have LibreOfficeDev on my TV screen right now. There’s a link to build instructions above and I’ll update it with the autogen flags I used. They’re somewhat arbitrary but yeah.

LibreOffice 6.3 Beta2 ready for testing

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The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce LibreOffice 6.3 Beta2 is ready for testing!

LibreOffice 6.3 will be released as final in mid August, 2019, being LibreOffice 6.3 Beta2 the third pre-release since the development of version 6.3 started in mid November, 2018 ( See the release plan ). Since LibreOffice 6.3 Beta1, 226 commits have been submitted to the code repository and 106 bugs have been set to FIXED in Bugzilla. Check the release notes to find the new features included in this version of LibreOffice.

LibreOffice 6.3 Beta2 can be downloaded from here, it’s available for Linux, MacOS and Windows. Besides, and it can be installed along with your actual installation.

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today's leftovers

  • Linux Weekly Roundup #35

    Hello and welcome to this week's Linux Roundup and what a wonderful week we had! We have plenty of Linux Distro releases and LibreOffice 6.3 RC1. The Linux distros with releases this week are Q4OS 3.8, SparkyLinux 5.8, Mageia 7.1, ArcoLinux 19.07.11, Deepin 15.11, ArchBang 2107-beta, Bluestar 5.2.1, Slackel 7.2 "Openbox" and Endeavour OS 2019.07.15. I looked at most of these Linux Distros, links below, I will look at some of them in the new week and some I will unfortunately not have a look at, for download links and more, please visit distrowatch.com Well, this is this week's Linux Roundup, thank you so much for your time! Have a great week!

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #140
  • Christopher Allan Webber: ActivityPub Conf 2019

    That's right! We're hosting the first ever ActivityPub Conf. It's immediately following Rebooting Web of Trust in Prague. There's no admission fee to attend. (Relatedly, the conference is kind of being done on the cheap, because it is being funded by organizers who are themselves barely funded.) The venue, however, is quite cool: it's at the DOX Centre for Contemporary Art, which is itself exploring the ways the digital world is affecting our lives. If you plan on attending (and maybe also speaking), you should get in your application soon (see the flier for details). We've never done one of these, and we have no idea what the response will be like, so this is going to be a smaller gathering (about 40 people). In some ways, it will be somewhere between a conference and a gathering of people-who-are-interested-in-activitypub. As said in the flier, by attending, you are agreeing to the code of conduct, so be sure to read that.

Sysadmin Appreciation Day, IBM and Fedora

  • Gift ideas for Sysadmin Appreciation Day

    Sysadmin Appreciation Day is coming up this Friday, July 26. To help honor sysadmins everywhere, we want you to share your best gift ideas. What would be the best way a team member or customer could show their appreciation for you? As a sysadmin, what was the best gift you've ever received? We asked our writers the same question, and here are their answers: "Whilst working in the Ubuntu community on Edubuntu, I took it upon myself to develop the startup/shutdown sound scheme, which became the default in Ubuntu for, from what I can understand, the next decade. Whilst people had a love-hate relationship with my sound scheme, and rightly so, I had a love-hate relationship with my sound card during the development. At the time I had recorded all my sound samples using one sample rate, but my new sound card, as my motherboard had exploded a few days earlier, did not support it. I had two choices, resample all my samples (which I didn't really want to do) or buy a new sound card.

  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform with Red Hat Ceph Storage: Radosbench baseline performance evaluation

    Red Hat Ceph Storage is popular storage for Red Hat OpenStack Platform. Customers around the world run their hyperscale, production workloads on Red Hat Ceph Storage and Red Hat OpenStack Platform. This is driven by the high level of integration between Ceph storage and OpenStack private cloud platforms. With each release of both platforms, the level of integration has grown and performance and automation has increased. As the customer's storage and compute needs for footprints have grown, we have seen more interest towards running compute and storage as one unit and providing a hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) layer based on OpenStack and Ceph. [...] Continuing the benchmarking series, in the next post you’ll learn performance insights of running multi-instance MySQL database on Red Hat OpenStack Platform and Red Hat Ceph Storage across decoupled and hyperconverged architectures. We’ll also compare results from a near-equal environment backed by all-flash cluster nodes.

  • The State of Java in Flathub

    For maintainers of Java-based applications in Flathub, it's worth noting that even if you consume the Latest OpenJDK extension in your application, users will not be broken by major updates because OpenJDK is bundled into your Flatpak. The implication of this for users is that they won't see updates to their Java version until the application maintainer rebuilds the application in Flathub. If you maintain a Java-based Flatpak application on Flathub, you can consume the latest version of your chosen OpenJDK stream (either LTS or Latest) simply by rebuilding; the latest version of that OpenJDK steam will be pulled in automatically.

  • Fedora Magazine: Contribute at the Fedora Test Week for kernel 5.2

    The kernel team is working on final integration for kernel 5.1. This version was just recently released, and will arrive soon in Fedora. This version has many security fixes included. As a result, the Fedora kernel and QA teams have organized a test week from Monday, Jul 22, 2019 through Monday, Jul 29, 2019. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate. Read below for details.

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Bootstrappable Debian BoF

    Greetings from DebConf 19 in Curitiba! Just a quick reminder that I will run a Bootstrappable Debian BoF on Tuesday 23rd, at 13.30 Brasilia time (which is 16.30 UTC, if I am not mistaken). If you are curious about bootstrappability in Debian, why do we want it and where we are right now, you are welcome to come in person if you are at DebCon or to follow the streaming.

  • Candy Tsai: Outreachy Week 6 – Week 7: Getting Code Merge

    You can’t overhear what others are doing or learn something about your colleagues through gossip over lunch break when working remotely. So after being stuck for quite a bit, terceiro suggested that we try pair programming. After our first remote pair programming session, I think there should be no difference in pair programming in person. We shared the same terminal, looked at the same code and discussed just like people standing side by side. Through our pair programming session, I found out that I had a bad habit. I didn’t run tests on my code that often, so when I had failing tests that didn’t fail before, I spent more time debugging than I should have. Pair programming gave insight to how others work and I think little improvements go a long way.

  • about your wiki page on I/O schedulers and BFQ
    Hi,
    this is basically to report outdated statements in your wiki page on
    I/O schedulers [1].
    
    The main problematic statement is that BFQ "...  is not ideal for
    devices with slow CPUs or high throughput I/O devices" because too
    heavy.  BFQ is definitely more sophisticated than any of the other I/O
    schedulers.  We have designed it that way to provide an incomparably
    better service quality, at a very low overhead.  As reported in [2],
    the execution time of BFQ on an old laptop CPU is 0.6 us per I/O
    event, against 0.2 us for mq-deadline (which is the lightest Linux I/O
    scheduler).
    
    To put these figures into context, BFQ proved to be so good for
    "devices with slow CPUs" that, e.g., Chromium OS migrated to BFQ a few
    months ago.  In particular, Google crew got convinced by a demo [3] I
    made for them, on one of the cheapest and slowest Chromebook on the
    market.  In the demo, a fast download is performed.  Without BFQ, the
    download makes the device completely unresponsive.  With BFQ, the
    device remains as responsive as if it was totally idle.
    
    As for the other part of the statement, "...  not ideal for ...  high
    throughput I/O devices", a few days ago I ran benchmarks (on Ubuntu)
    also with one of the fastest consumer-grade NVMe SSDs: a Samsung SSD
    970 PRO.  Results [4] can be summarized as follows.  Throughput with
    BFQ is about the same as with the other I/O schedulers (it couldn't be
    higher, because this kind of drives just wants the scheduler to stay
    as aside as possible, when it comes to throughput).  But, in the
    presence of writes as background workload, start-up times with BFQ are
    at least 16 times as low as with the other I/O schedulers.  In
    absolute terms, gnome-terminal starts in ~1.8 seconds with BFQ, while
    it takes at least 28.7 (!) seconds with the other I/O schedulers.
    Finally, only with BFQ, no frame gets lost in video-playing
    benchmarks.
    
    BFQ then provides other important benefits, such as from 5x to 10X
    throughput boost in multi-client server workloads [5].
    
    So, is there any chance that the outdated/wrong information on your
    wiki page [1] gets updated somehow?  If I may, I'd be glad to update
    it myself, after providing you with all the results you may ask.
    
    In addition, why doesn't Ubuntu too consider switching to BFQ as
    default I/O scheduler, for all drives that BFQ supports (namely all
    drives with a maximum speed not above ~500 KIOPS)?
    
    Looking forward to your feedback,
    Paolo
    
    
  • Should Ubuntu Use The BFQ I/O Scheduler?

    The BFQ I/O scheduler is working out fairly well these days as shown in our benchmarks. The Budget Fair Queueing scheduler supports both throughput and low-latency modes while working particularly well for consumer-grade hardware. Should the Ubuntu desktop be using BFQ by default? [...] But in addition to wanting to correct that Wiki information, Paolo pops the question of why doesn't Ubuntu switch to BFQ as the default I/O scheduler for supported drives. Though as of yet, no Ubuntu kernel developers have yet commented on the prospect of switching to BFQ.

Devices With Linux Support

  • Quest Releases KACE SDA & SMA Updates

    The update to 7.0 for KACE Systems Deployment Appliance is primarily about bringing a scope of endpoint management capabilities with new support for Linux devices to the table.

  • Rugged, Kaby Lake transport computer has a 10-port LAN switch with PoE

    Axiomtek’s Linux-ready “tBOX400-510-FL” transportation system has a 7th Gen Intel CPU and a 10-port managed switch with 8x M12-style 10/100Mbps PoE and 2x GbE ports. The rugged system also has 3x mini-PCIe slots and dual swappable SATA drives. Axiomtek has launched a fanless, Kaby Lake-U based transportation computer with a choice of power supplies designed for in-vehicle, marine, or railway applications. The rugged tBOX400-510-FL features a Qualcomm-driven, Layer 2 managed PoE switch with support for IP surveillance and video management applications. “Customers can connect IP cameras directly without installing an extra PoE switch, minimizing overall deployment costs and installation space onboard,” stated Axiomtek product manager Sharon Huang.