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LibO

LibreOffice 7.4 Is Now Available for Public Beta Testing, Here’s What to Expect

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LibO
Linux
News
Software

LibreOffice 7.4 will be the fourth major release in the LibreOffice 7 series of the widely used office suite for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows platforms, and it will introduce various new features and many improvements.

While I can’t reveal all of LibreOffice 7.4 features until the final release in mid-August 2022, I can tell you that there will be enhancements all over the place, many of them contributed by Collabora and others by volunteers.

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LibreOffice 7.4 Beta1 is available for testing

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LibO

The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce LibreOffice 7.4 Beta1 is available for testing!

LibreOffice 7.4 will be released as final in mid August, 2022 ( Check the Release Plan for more information ) being LibreOffice 7.4 Beta1 the second pre-release since the development of version 7.4 started at the end of November, 2021. Since the previous release, LibreOffice 7.4 Alpha1, 920 commits have been submitted to the code repository and 220 issues got fixed. Check the release notes to find the new features included in this version of LibreOffice.

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New versions of Collabora, LibreOffice, KDE Gear released

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KDE
LibO
OSS
OOo

Fresh versions of three of the bigger open-source application suites just landed for those seeking to break free from proprietary office apps.

LibreOffice is the highest profile of them, and the project recently put out version 7.3.4, the latest release in the Community version of the suite.

The Document Foundation maintains two versions of LibreOffice; the other is the Enterprise branch.

Both versions are free. The difference is that the Community version is the faster-moving development branch. It's comparable to a free Linux distro, or a short-term Ubuntu release: there's no commercial support, but you may be able to get assistance from other users – in other words, the Community.

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LibreOffice 7.4: Top New Features and Release Details

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LibO

A list of new features in the LibreOffice 7.4 edition, including the highlights of enhancements across Calc, Impress, Writer and more.
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LibreOffice 7.3.4 Is Now Available for Download, More Than 85 Bugs Fixed

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LibO
Linux
News
Software

Coming a little over a month after LibreOffice 7.3.3, the LibreOffice 7.3.4 point release is here to fix a total of 88 bugs across all core components of the open-source office suite in an attempt to make the LibreOffice 7.3 series more stable and reliable for daily use.

If you’re already using the LibreOffice 7.3 office suite in your GNU/Linux distribution, I highly recommend that you update your installations as soon as possible to version 7.3.4 for the best possible experience.

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Content controls in Writer: dropdown, picture and date types

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Development
LibO

Word users expect to be able to import their document to Writer and experience a matching feature set: form filling is not an exception. Word provides several content control kinds (inline, block, row and cell content controls), this project focuses on inline ("run") content controls.

In the scope of inline content controls, the above linked blog post already described the rich text and checkbox types. In this post, we’ll focus on the new dropdown, picture and date content controls.

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Also: Index of Training Videos about LibreOffice

LibreOffice and More

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LibO
  • LibreOffice at the Univention Summit 2022

    After two years of pandemic restrictions, more and more in-person events are now taking place. Members of the LibreOffice community attended the recent Univention Summit 2022 in Bremen, northern Germany. They had a stand with LibreOffice merchandise, talked to visitors and answered questions.

  • May 2022, Month of LibreOffice Awards

    In May 2022, LibreOffice has received two Awards: SourceForge’s Open Source Project of the Month, and Software Informer’s Editor’s Pick.

  • Do While – Loop Example in Python | Mark Ai Code

    Loops are an important and widely utilized element in all current programming languages.

    A loop is the finest solution for automating a certain repeated operation or preventing yourself from writing repetitive code in your projects.

    Loops are sequences of instructions that are executed repeatedly until a condition is fulfilled. Let’s take a closer look at how Python loops function.

LibreOffice and Free/Libre Software in Education

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LibO
  • Indonesian LibreOffice community: recent activities

    On Wednesday, 18 May 2022, I had the opportunity to talk in one of the sessions at the Virtual Visit of SMK Amaliah 1 Ciawi Bogor. This activity is a routine agenda for Amaliah Vocational School in the form of seminars and visits to institutions or communities to broaden students’ knowledge of Information and Communication Technology to Support Creative and Innovative Education.

  • FSFE signs Dutch manifesto calling for education improvements

    Students should not have to use proprietary software to participate in the educational process. The FSFE joins the Dutch coalition ‘Fair Digital Education’ supporting privacy-respecting solutions involving Free Software in schools.

Annual Report: TDF’s (The Document Foundation) infrastructure in 2021

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LibO

So I enabled support for up to 16384 columns in Calc by default some time ago, but just getting it to work was not necessarily the end of the work. Making Calc have 16 times more columns means that any operation that works on entire columns is suddenly 16 times slower, or even worse. Similarly this could easily lead to 16x more memory used. So the support not only needs to work, but it also needs to be usable.

It theory adding a number of empty columns to the end of a spreadsheet should not make a difference, but in practice it does. With 1024 columns it is not as necessary to ignore those empty columns as it is with 16k, and a lot of the code dates back to the times when Calc supported even fewer colums (256?), where a being little inefficient here or there didn't show. But now it suddently did.

For example, if you protect or hide all unused columns until the end of the spreadsheet, then hitting the right arrow key on the last accessible cell makes Calc check all cells to the right for whether it's possible to go into them. And checking whether a column is hidden requires searching the list of column information, which is not trivial (it's compacted in order not to waste memory). The barely noticeable cost of this with 1024 columns got large enough to cause noticeable delays. Fortunately the ColHidden() function is smart enough to return the first and last column in the compacted range where the flag is equal, the code doing the cursor navigation just up until now didn't bother using that information, but now it needed to do so.

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Improving Calc support for 16384 columns

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LibO

So I enabled support for up to 16384 columns in Calc by default some time ago, but just getting it to work was not necessarily the end of the work. Making Calc have 16 times more columns means that any operation that works on entire columns is suddenly 16 times slower, or even worse. Similarly this could easily lead to 16x more memory used. So the support not only needs to work, but it also needs to be usable.

It theory adding a number of empty columns to the end of a spreadsheet should not make a difference, but in practice it does. With 1024 columns it is not as necessary to ignore those empty columns as it is with 16k, and a lot of the code dates back to the times when Calc supported even fewer colums (256?), where a being little inefficient here or there didn't show. But now it suddently did.

For example, if you protect or hide all unused columns until the end of the spreadsheet, then hitting the right arrow key on the last accessible cell makes Calc check all cells to the right for whether it's possible to go into them. And checking whether a column is hidden requires searching the list of column information, which is not trivial (it's compacted in order not to waste memory). The barely noticeable cost of this with 1024 columns got large enough to cause noticeable delays. Fortunately the ColHidden() function is smart enough to return the first and last column in the compacted range where the flag is equal, the code doing the cursor navigation just up until now didn't bother using that information, but now it needed to do so.

Read more

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today's howtos

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    In this tutorial, we are going to explore how to install go on Ubuntu 22.04 Golang is an open-source programming language that is easy to learn and use. It is built-in concurrency and has a robust standard library. It is reliable, builds fast, and efficient software that scales fast. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel-type systems enable flexible and modular program constructions. Go compiles quickly to machine code and has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. In this guide, we are going to learn how to install golang 1.19beta on Ubuntu 22.04. Go 1.19beta1 is not yet released. There is so much work in progress with all the documentation.

  • molecule test: failed to connect to bus in systemd container - openQA bites

    Ansible Molecule is a project to help you test your ansible roles. I’m using molecule for automatically testing the ansible roles of geekoops.

  • How To Install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install MongoDB on AlmaLinux 9. For those of you who didn’t know, MongoDB is a high-performance, highly scalable document-oriented NoSQL database. Unlike in SQL databases where data is stored in rows and columns inside tables, in MongoDB, data is structured in JSON-like format inside records which are referred to as documents. The open-source attribute of MongoDB as a database software makes it an ideal candidate for almost any database-related project. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the MongoDB NoSQL database on AlmaLinux 9. You can follow the same instructions for CentOS and Rocky Linux.

  • An introduction (and how-to) to Plugin Loader for the Steam Deck. - Invidious
  • Self-host a Ghost Blog With Traefik

    Ghost is a very popular open-source content management system. Started as an alternative to WordPress and it went on to become an alternative to Substack by focusing on membership and newsletter. The creators of Ghost offer managed Pro hosting but it may not fit everyone's budget. Alternatively, you can self-host it on your own cloud servers. On Linux handbook, we already have a guide on deploying Ghost with Docker in a reverse proxy setup. Instead of Ngnix reverse proxy, you can also use another software called Traefik with Docker. It is a popular open-source cloud-native application proxy, API Gateway, Edge-router, and more. I use Traefik to secure my websites using an SSL certificate obtained from Let's Encrypt. Once deployed, Traefik can automatically manage your certificates and their renewals. In this tutorial, I'll share the necessary steps for deploying a Ghost blog with Docker and Traefik.

Red Hat Hires a Blind Software Engineer to Improve Accessibility on Linux Desktop

Accessibility on a Linux desktop is not one of the strongest points to highlight. However, GNOME, one of the best desktop environments, has managed to do better comparatively (I think). In a blog post by Christian Fredrik Schaller (Director for Desktop/Graphics, Red Hat), he mentions that they are making serious efforts to improve accessibility. Starting with Red Hat hiring Lukas Tyrychtr, who is a blind software engineer to lead the effort in improving Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and Fedora Workstation in terms of accessibility. Read more

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