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LibO

Results from the Survey about LibreOffice Calc

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LibO

Earlier this year we run a survey on LibreOffice Calc. It was inspired by a similar questionnaire for LibreOffice Draw (see first and second blog post). The Calc survey was used to learn about how Calc is being used, what features are most important to users and where they expect to see the improvements to the software. The work was done by Maria Berg, thanks a lot for your contribution.

This blog post shows some results in detail. You may also watch the recording of the presentation at the LibreOffice conference at http:// (link will be added later)

In total 1797 people started the survey and 1229 completed all questions. Many thanks to everyone!

We started with a couple of demographic questions that demonstrated the limits of online surveys: most participants were middle age (65% between 33 and 65 years old), technology-affine (60% use Linux as operating system), and power users (45% run the application every day). We advertised the survey on our blog and social media such as Twitter (you may also follow the design team), Reddit, and Facebook. And while LibreOffice has roughly 200 millions users, most of those who are following us are technology enthusiastic.

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LibreOffice Leftovers

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LibO
  • Michael Meeks/2021-10-15 Friday

    After Italo's keynote announcement of the new LibreOffice Technology marketing plan at the LibreOffice conference, we lost no time integrating this great way to fairly present the goodness of LibreOffice that we depend on to build Collabora Online & Collabora Office mobile into the product. With new links that can take you to our LibreOffice Technology page where we can celebrate the community & credit all the hard work done under the hood here, and of course the logo. Still a work-in-progress, and will start to appear in our products over the next weeks as/when we refresh them, but so far it looks like this for desktop & mobile

    [...]

    up-coming COOL About dialog up-coming COOL About dialog
    Thanks to Italo & Mike at TDF for developing the concept, and also to Pedro & Elisa, for their work on the code & logos - we'll be iterating it with them over the next days & weeks.

  • Let's do awesome things! Get support for your projects and ideas from our budget - The Document Foundation Blog

    Want to organise a local (or online) LibreOffice event? Need some merchandise to boost your project or community? Then we can help you! The Document Foundation, the non-profit behind LibreOffice, is backed by contributions from ecosystem members and volunteers, as well as donations from end-users. This helps us to maintain TDF, but we can do a lot more too. And next year, we want to do a lot of projects again!

  • Next batch of videos from the LibreOffice Conference 2021 - The Document Foundation Blog

    Here are some more videos from the LibreOffice Conference 2021! Check out the playlist, using the button in the top-right – or scroll down for links to individual videos...

  • Automated bibisect to find source of a bug - LibreOffice Development Blog

    In programming, we usually face bugs that we should fix to maintain or improve our software. In order to fix a bug, first we should find the source of the problem, and there are tools like “Automated bibisect” are available to help, specially when the bug is a regression.

LibreOffice 7.2.2 for Slackware-current is available

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LibO
Slack

LibreOffice Community Edition 7.2.2 was released yesterday and I have uploaded a new set packages for Slackware-current.

The document conversion libraries have been split off and made available via the Document Liberation Project : documentliberation.org . It is the home for a growing community of developers ‘united to free users from vendor lock-in of content‘. Software like Calligra, Inkscape and Scribus also make good use of the document format conversion capabilities these libraries offer.

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LibreOffice 7.2.2 Community Released with 68 Bug Fixes, Update Now

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LibO
Linux
News

The LibreOffice 7.2 office suite was released in mid-August 2021 with many new features and improvements for all of its core components, including Writer, Calc, Impress & Draw, Math, and Chart, native support for Apple M1 machines, as well as improved interoperability with the MS Office document formats.

LibreOffice 7.2.2 is here about a month after the LibreOffice 7.2.1 point release to fix even more bugs and security issues. According to the RC1 and RC2 changelogs, there are a total of 68 bug fixes, so you should update your installations as soon as possible.

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Hossein Nourikhah, Developer Community Architect, Sets Up a New LibreOffice Development Blog

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Development
LibO
  • Check out the new LibreOffice Development Blog!

    Here on The Document Foundation’s blog, we post about general news and activities in the LibreOffice world. But now we have a dedicated development blog, set up by Hossein Nourikhah, who recently joined us as a Developer Community Architect.

  • LibreOffice Development blog has started! - LibreOffice Development Blog

    To know more about what is going on in LibreOffice, you can refer to the main Document Foundation blog. Also, if you want to learn more about the LibreOffice design, you can refer to the LibreOffice Design Team blog. And now, we have created a new blog, dedicated to the LibreOffice development!

  • Getting Started (Video Tutorial) - LibreOffice Development Blog

    LibreOffice development starts with setting up a development environment. After that, you can do the development in your favorite IDE. In this 80 minutes presentation, you will find everything you need to know to get started with LibreOffice development; from installing dependencies using distribution tools, LODE (LibreOffice Development Environment) or manual setup to compilation itself.

    With this tutorial, you can build LibreOffice for yourself. Then we look at some simple tasks from LibreOffice EasyHacks. After that, you can try to get your submission merged into the LibreOffice code by submitting it to gerrit, and doing the fixes requested by the reviewers.

LibreOffice on Chromebooks and Apache/OpenOffice

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LibO
OOo
  • How to install LibreOffice 7.2 on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install LibreOffice 7.2 on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

    If you have any questions, please contact us via a YouTube comment and we would be happy to assist you!

  • Apache Month in Review: September 2021

    Welcome to the latest monthly overview of events from the Apache community. Here's a summary of what happened in September [video highlights available]...

  • This Week In Security: OpenOffice Vulnerable, IOS Vulnerable, Outlook… You Get The Idea | Hackaday

    We start this week with a good write-up by [Eugene Lim] on getting started on vulnerability hunting, and news of a problem in OpenOffice’s handling of DBase files. [Lim] decided to concentrate on a file format, and picked the venerable dbase format, .dbf. This database format was eventually used all over the place, and is still supported in Microsoft Office, Libreoffice, and OpenOffice. He put together a fuzzing approach using Peach Fuzzer, and found a handful of possible vulnerabilities in the file format, by testing a very simple file viewer that supported the format. He managed to achieve code execution in dbfview, but that wasn’t enough.

    Armed with a vulnerability in one application, [Lim] turned his attention to OpenOffice. He knew exactly what he was looking for, and found vulnerable code right away. A buffer is allocated based on the specified data type, but data is copied into this buffer with a different length, also specified in the dbase file. Simple buffer overflow. Turning this into an actual RCE exploit took a bit of doing, but is possible. The disclosure didn’t include a full PoC, but will likely be reverse engineered shortly.

    Normally we’d wrap by telling you to go get the update, but OpenOffice doesn’t have a stable release with this fix in it. There is a release candidate that does contain the fix, but every stable install of OpenOffice in the world is currently vulnerable to this RCE. The vulnerability report was sent way back on May 4th, over 90 days before full disclosure. And what about LibreOffice, the fork of OpenOffice? Surely it is also vulnerable? Nope. LibreOffice fixed this in routine code maintenance back in 2014. The truth of the matter is that when the two projects forked, the programmers who really understood the codebase went to LibreOffice, and OpenOffice has had a severe programmer shortage ever since. I’ve said it before: Use LibreOffice, OpenOffice is known to be unsafe.

  • All Your (d)Base Are Belong To Us, Part 1: Code Execution in Apache OpenOffice (CVE-2021–33035) [Ed: How many still use OpenOffice instead of LibreOffice]

    Venturing out into the wilderness of vulnerability research can be a daunting task. Coming from a background in primarily web and application security, I had to shift my hacking mindset towards memory corruption vulnerabilities and local attack vectors. This two-part series will share how I got started in vulnerability research by discovering and exploiting code execution zero-days in office applications used by hundreds of millions of people. I will outline my approach to getting started in vulnerability research including dumb fuzzing, coverage-guided fuzzing, reverse engineering, and source code review. I will also discuss some management aspects of vulnerability research such as CVE assignment and responsible disclosure.

LibreOffice Lands Initial Code For Qt6 Toolkit Support

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LibO

Merged this morning into the LibreOffice code-base is the initial Qt6 VCL plug-in.

LibreOffice supports multiple Visual Class Library (VCL) plug-ins for different toolkits from the Windows and macOS Quartz user-interface back-ends to the GTK and Qt5 back-ends and more for supporting different user-interface implementations depending upon the platform. Complementing the LibreOffice Qt5 VCL is now an early, work-in-progress Qt6 VCL.

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Also: Start of list level support in Writer paragraph styles

Events: Debian Reunion Hamburg 2021 and LibreOffice Conference 2021

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LibO
Debian
  • Debian Reunion Hamburg 2021, klein aber fein

    So the Debian Reunion Hamburg 2021 has been going on for not yet 48h now and it appears people are having fun, enjoying discussions between fellow Debian people and getting some stuff done as well. I guess I'll write some more about it once the event is over...

  • LibreOffice Conference 2021: Opening session

    Here’s the opening session from last week’s LibreOffice Conference 2021!

    More sessions to come, plus a playlist and PeerTube alternatives…

    Please confirm that you want to play a YouTube video. By accepting, you will be accessing content from YouTube, a service provided by an external third party.

Happy Birthday, LibreOffice!

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LibO

Eleven years ago, on 28 September 2010, a new chapter in the history of free office suites started: the creation of the LibreOffice project and the start of The Document Foundation as independent entity. Thanks truly to everyone who made this amazing journey possible. <3 Happy birthday!

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My favorite LibreOffice productivity tips

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LibO

LibreOffice is my productivity application of choice. It's one of the most potent reasons for recommending Linux distributions to educators and students, whether PK-12 or higher education. Now that the school year is upon us, I thought I would recommend some LibreOffice shortcuts and tips that might save you valuable time.

I use a lot of keyboard shortcuts. Here are the most common shortcuts that apply to all LibreOffice applications.

There are lots of document formats out there, and LibreOffice supports a good number of them. By default, LibreOffice saves documents to the Open Document Format, an open source standard that stores stylesheets and data in a ZIP container labeled as ODT for text documents, ODS for spreadsheets, and ODP for presentations. It's a flexible format and is maintained by the LibreOffice community as well as the Document Foundation.

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CuteFish – An Elegant, Beautiful and Easy-to-Use Linux Desktop

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Former Microsoft Security Analyst Claims Office 365 Knowingly Hosted Malware For Years

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today's leftovers

  • pam-krb5 4.11

    The primary change in this release of my Kerberos PAM module is support for calling pam_end with PAM_DATA_SILENT. I had not known that the intent of this flag was to signal that only process resources were being cleaned up and external resources should not be (in part because an older version of the man page doesn't make this clear).

  • QB64 Hits Version 2.0, Gets Enhanced Debugging | Hackaday

    Despite the name, BASIC isn’t exactly a language recommended for beginners these days. Technology has moved on, and now most people would steer you towards Python if you wanted to get your feet wet with software development. But for those who got their first taste of programming by copying lines of BASIC out of a computer magazine, the language still holds a certain nostalgic appeal.

  • All Things Open: Diversity Event Today - Big Top Goes Up Monday! - FOSS Force

    By now things are going full tilt boogie in downtown Raleigh, as the All Things Open conference is well into its “pre” day. Keeping with the trend set by other conferences, All Things Open opens a day ahead of time, partially to stage free event’s that aren’t officially a part of the main show, but which offer attendees from out-of-town a reason to fly in a day early to settle in. This is good for the travelling attendees, because they don’t spend the first day suffering for jet lag or other forms of travel fatigue, and good for the event, because it means that more people are in place to fill seats and attend presentations, beginning with the opening keynote. [...] At ATO, the registration desks are open on Sunday from noon until 5:30 Eastern Time, and the pre-conference is a free Inclusion and Diversity Event that started at noon and will run until 5pm, emceed by Rikki Endsley, formally with Red Hat and now a community marketing manager at Amazon Web Services.

  • [Older] Arduino Nano Pros and Cons: Is the Cheapest Arduino Worth It?

    While there is quite an array of Arduino boards to choose from, the Nano is a versatile board suitable for almost all DIY electronic projects. These tiny micro controllers make compact DIY hardware development available to more people than ever before. In the past we have covered reasons you may not want to choose a genuine Arduino for your projects, but today lets take a look at the positives and negatives of the Arduino Nano.

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  • How to install Thinkorswim Desktop on a Chromebook in 2021

    Today we are looking at how to install Thinkorswim Desktop on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

Digital Restrictions (DRM) on Printers