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Community Member Monday: Iwan Tahari on LibreOffice migrations in Indonesia

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GNU
LibO
Linux

Many companies around the world use free and open source software (FOSS) to reduce costs, improve reliability, and free themselves from vendor lock-in. Today we talk to Iwan Tahari from FANS, an Indonesian shoe manufacturer, which has migrated to GNU/Linux and LibreOffice...

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Report: LibreOffice Bug Hunting Session in Taiwan

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LibO

LibreOffice’s worldwide community is active in many parts of the project – in development, localisation, documentation, design, marketing and more. There’s also the Quality Assurance (QA) community, which focuses on identifying and fixing bugs. At a recent event in Taiwan, a Bug Hunting Session took place to check bug reports, as Franklin Weng explains…

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Software: LibreOffice, LibrePCB and Darktable

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LibO
Software
  • Month of LibreOffice, November 2018: The winners!

    This is the best Month of LibreOffice we’ve ever had, reflecting our lively and growing community.

  • LibrePCB 0.1.0 Released

    Since the release candidate 0.1.0 RC2 three weeks ago, no critical bugs were reported, so we decided to finally publish the stable release 0.1.0.

  • LibrePCB 0.1.0 released with major changes in library editor and file format

    Last week, the team at LibrePCB released LibrePCB 0.1.0., a free EDA (Electronic Design Automation) software used for developing printed circuit boards. Just three weeks ago, LibrePCB 0.1.0 RC2 was released with major changes in library manager, control panel, library editor, schematic editor and more.

    The key features of LibrePCB include, cross-platform (Unix/ Linux, Mac OS X, Windows), all-in-one (project management, library/schematic/board editors) and intuitive, modern and easy-to-use graphical user interface. It also features powerful library designs and human-readable file formats.

  • Darktable 2.6 Release Cycle Kicks Off With New Modules, PPC64LE Support

    Developers are beginning to firm up the Darktable 2.6 release as the next feature update to this amazing, cross-platform open-source RAW photography software.

    This open-source photography workflow software continues getting better and with Darktable 2.6 there are more features coming as outlined by yesterday's 2.6-RC0 tag.

LibreOffice and Sparky Donations Toll/Requests

Filed under
GNU
LibO
Linux
  • LibreOffice Fundraising, December 1st

    Consider a donation to support activities such as the LibreItalia Conference and other events organized by native language communities https://www.libreoffice.org/donate

  • November 2018 donation report

    Many thanks to all of you for supporting Sparky!
    Your donations help keeping Sparky alive.

Albania's Capital, Tirana, Moves to Open Source Software by Adopting LibreOffice

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LibO
OSS

Being the capital city, Tirana is the most populous city in Albania, known for its colorful, post-Communist buildings and Soviet-era architecture. In an attempt to adopt the Open Source way to save more money, Tirana has recently attempted to implement various free and open source solutions for their public IT infrastructure, by migrating to projects like Nextcloud and LibreOffice.

"Ermir Puka, the head of the ICT Department, believes that despite the resistance to change and the other big challenges facing the migration, using free and open source software and platforms like LibreOffice – supporting open standards – will guide the IT infrastructure of the municipality in the best interest of the citizens of Tirana," writes The Document Foundation's Italo Vignoli.

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LibreOffice 6.2 Enters Beta with New User Interface Design Called "Notebookbar"

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LibO

Expected to arrive next year on February, LibreOffice 6.2 will be the second semi-major update to the LibreOffice 6 office suite series, bringing a bunch of enhancements and new features to make your daily office tasks easier and more enjoyable. One of these new features is an optional UI design called the Notebookbar.

The Notebookbar UI is included in the beta version of LibreOffice 6.2 if you want to take it for a test drive (details below), along with the KDE Plasma 5 integration and numerous other improvements we talked about in a previous article. Of course, LibreOffice 6.2 will also include lots of stability and reliability updates.

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Import your files from closed or obsolete applications

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LibO
OOo

One of the biggest risks with using proprietary applications is losing access to your digital content if the software disappears or ends support for old file formats. Moving your content to an open format is the best way to protect yourself from being locked out due to vendor lock-in and for that, the Document Liberation Project (DLP) has your back.

According to the DLP's homepage, "The Document Liberation Project was created to empower individuals, organizations, and governments to recover their data from proprietary formats and provide a mechanism to transition that data into open and standardized file formats, returning effective control over the content from computer companies to the actual authors."

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LibreOffice 6.1.3 Open-Source Office Suite Released with 66 Bug Fixes

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LibO
Security

While it remains the choice of early adopters, technology enthusiasts, and power users, the latest LibreOffice 6.1 series of the open-source office suite, which is used by default in numerous Linux-based operating systems, gets no less than 66 bug fixes in the LibreOffice 6.1.3 point release, as detailed here and here.

Coincidentally, the LibreOffice 6.0.7 point release also comes with a total of 66 bug fixes, detailed here, here, and here. The LibreOffice 6.0 series remains the main choice for enterprises and all sorts of organizations who want to use the best free and open-source office suite on the market, according to The Document Foundation's Italo Vignoli.

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10 Useful LibreOffice Tips to Boost Your Productivity

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LibO

LibreOffice is undoubtedly the most popular alternative to Microsoft Office among Linux users even though there are options like SoftMaker Office and FreeOffice.

Whether you use it to create technical articles, reports, flowcharts, etc. there are steps you can take to boost your productivity and it is with pleasure that we bring you our list of 10.

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LibreOffice 6.2 Launches February 2019, May Drop Support for 32-bit Linux Builds

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LibO

The second major update to the LibreOffice 6 series, LibreOffice 6.2, is expected to arrive next year, in early February, and it may be the first release of the acclaimed and free office suite to drop support for 32-bit Linux builds. This means that 32-bit LibreOffice releases won't be available on the Linux platform anymore.

While The Document Foundation assures Linux users in the preliminary release notes for LibreOffice 6.2 that Linux x86 (32-bit) compatibility will not be removed from existing LibreOffice versions, the company noted the fact that no new builds will be produced for the Linux x86 platform starting with a future version.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Watchdog: IRS botched Linux migration

Poor IT governance prevented the IRS from making progress on a long-term effort to migrate 141 legacy applications from proprietary vendor software to open source Linux operating systems, according to an audit by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration. Under a migration plan developed in 2014, two-thirds of targeted applications and databases were supposed to have been successfully migrated by December 2016. However, only eight of the 141 applications targeted have successfully transitioned to Linux as of February 2018. More than one third have not even started. Read more

Graphics: Wayland's Weston, AMD, GitLab, NVIDIA

  • Wayland's Weston Switching Over To The Meson Build System
    Complementing the Meson build system support for Wayland itself, the Weston reference compositor now has been Meson-ized. Pekka Paalanen and Daniel Stone, both of Collabora, have landed the Meson build system support for the Weston compositor. At this stage the new build system should be fully working and correct.
  • AMDGPU DC Gets Polaris Corruption Fix, Some Code Refactoring
    AMD has published their latest batch of "DC" Display Core patches for the AMDGPU Linux kernel driver. This batch of 45 patches against this display code for the AMDGPU Direct Rendering Manager driver has some code cleanups and refactoring, changes some error messages to just warnings, and has a display corruption fix affecting some Polaris hardware.
  • Investigating GitLab
    The Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) kernel subsystem is a fairly small part of the kernel, he said. It is also a fairly small part of the open-source graphics stack, which is under the X.Org umbrella. DRM sits in the middle between the two, so the project has learned development tools and workflows from both of the larger projects. The kernel brought DRM into the Git world in 2006, which was just a year after Git came about; it was a "rough ride" back then, Vetter said. With Git came "proper commit messages". Prior to that, the X.org commit messages might just be a single, unhelpful line; now those messages explain why the change is being made and what it does. The idea of iterating on a patch series on the mailing list came from the kernel side as did the "benevolent dictator" model of maintainership. DRM, the X server, Wayland, and others all followed that model along the way. From the X.Org side came things like the committer model; in Mesa, every contributor had commit rights. That model has swept through the graphics community, so now DRM, the X server, and Wayland are all run using that scheme. Testing and continuous integration (CI) is something that DRM has adopted from X.Org; the kernel also does this, but DRM has adopted the X.Org approach, tooling, and test suites. For historical reasons, "almost everything" is under the MIT license, which comes from X.Org projects as well. There has been a lot of movement of tools and development strategies in both directions via the DRM subsystem. He thinks that using GitLab may be "the next big wave of changes" coming from the user-space side to kernel graphics, and maybe to the kernel itself eventually. This won't happen this year or next year, Vetter predicted, but over the next few years we will see GitLab being used more extensively.
  • AMDGPU For Linux 4.20 Gets The Final Radeon RX 590 Fix, Adds The New Vega PCI IDs
    With just over one week to go until the expected Linux 4.20 kernel release, Alex Deucher of AMD today sent in the latest batch of fixes to the DRM tree for landing at the end of this cycle. Notable about this latest set of "fixes" for the AMDGPU kernel graphics driver are: - The final Radeon RX 590 fix so this newer Polaris GPU no longer hangs under load. So once this Linux 4.20 material is merged to mainline, this month-old Polaris graphics card should now be happily running on Linux -- assuming you also have the latest Polaris firmware files and a recent version of Mesa. See our Radeon RX 590 benchmarks article for more details.
  • AMDVLK 2018.Q4.4 Driver Update Brings Performance Improvements, New Vulkan Bits
    AMD developers today outed their latest "AMDVLK" open-source Vulkan driver code drop dubbed AMDVLK 2018.Q4.4.
  • NVIDIA 415.23 Driver Fixes Build Issues Against Linux 4.20 Kernel
    The NVIDIA 415.23 driver was issued just to fix a build issue against the near-final Linux 4.20 kernels. In particular, there has been a build failure around the vm_insert_pfn function that is now worked around when building the NVIDIA proprietary driver's shim against the Linux 4.20 release candidates.
  • NVIDIA Now Shipping The Jetson AGX Xavier Module
    NVIDIA has been shipping the Jetson AGX Xavier Developer Kit the past few months while now they are beginning to ship the AGX Xavier Module intended for use in next-generation autonomous machines.

OpenSUSE/SUSE: 2018-2019 Elections Underway, SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 4, and 'Making the Selection' (Storage)

  • 2018-2019 Elections Underway with Calls for Candidates and New Members
    Earlier this week, on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, the Elections Committee posted the Schedule for the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections, along with the announcement of a Membership Drive and a call for nominations and applications for Candidates to fill three vacant seats on the openSUSE Board. The annual Board Elections are normally expected to run in November and December, with ballots cast and results published in time for the newly-elected Board Members to take their seats on the Board at the beginning of January. However, some additional work needed to be completed for this election, and the elections were delayed in part to accommodate the additional work.
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 4 is Generally Available
    SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 4 is now generally available. Service Pack 4 marks the fourth generation of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12, a major code stream and product foundation with a lifecycle from 2014 to 2024 plus Long Term Support (10+3 years). This release consolidates all fixes and updates introduced since SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 3.
  • Making the Selection
    You’ve likely read or heard a lot about today’s data explosion and how it’s affecting enterprises. After combing through all the overexcited rhetoric about how quickly data is multiplying or how many petabytes you’ll soon have to handle, one thing remains clear: You need to find a new way to store and manage your data or you’ll get left behind. While that mandate puts pressure on your organization to act quickly, it’s also the catalyst to a whole new world of exciting opportunities. More data can mean deeper, more accurate insights into your operations and customer needs, which empowers you to streamline processes and personalize experiences like never before. More data can also lead to greater innovation and new sources of revenue.