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LibO

Best free Microsoft Office alternative software

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LibO
OOo

Thanks to the Open Document Format, you can easily access all files and edit and save them with no hassle.

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Events: Linux Plumbers, SUSE in Germany and LibreOffice Paris HackFest

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LibO
Linux
SUSE
  • Linux Plumbers Earlybird Registration Quota Reached, Regular Registration Opens 30 June

    A few days ago we added more capacity to the earlybird registration quota, but that too has now filled up, so your next opportunity to register for Plumbers will be Regular Registration on 30 June … or alternatively the call for presentations to the refereed track is still open and accepted talks will get a free pass.

  • Gartner IT Infrastructure, Operations and Cloud Strategies Conference Frankfurt 2019

    In a week’s time, team SUSE will be heading to Frankfurt, Germany for this year’s Gartner IT Infrastructure, Operations and Cloud Strategies Conference. Hundreds of attendees from all around Europe will be paying Kap Europa Congress Centre in Frankfurt a visit – to network, speak to exhibitors, pick up valuable nuggets of information from the Gartner analysts, attend sessions to learn more about the latest happenings in IT infrastructure and operations and enjoy all that the beautiful city of Frankfurt has to offer.

  • LibreOffice Paris HackFest

    The LibreOffice Paris HackFest 2019 will take place on the weekend of July 5th-6th, at le 137, which is at 137 Boulevard Magenta, Paris 10e, France. The event is sponsored by INNO3, hosting the hackfest in their building, and The Document Foundation, providing reimbursement for travels and accommodations.

    LibreOffice Paris HackFest will start on Friday at 10AM. During the day there will be an informal meeting of the French community, to discuss local activities, while developers and other volunteers will hack the LibreOffice code. The venue will be available until 2AM. On Saturday the venue will open at 10AM, to allow people to continue working, and share hackfest results. The event will officially end at 8PM, but on Sunday there will be a city tour.

The Document Foundation releases LibreOffice 6.2.4

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LibO

The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.2.4, the fourth bug and regression fixing release of the LibreOffice 6.2 family, targeted at tech-savvy individuals: early adopters, technology enthusiasts and power users.

LibreOffice’s individual users are helped by a global community of volunteers: https://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/community-support/. On the website and the wiki there are guides, manuals, tutorials and HowTos. Donations help us to make all of these resources available.

LibreOffice users are invited to join the community at https://www.libreoffice.org/community/get-involved/, to improve LibreOffice by contributing back in one of the following areas: development, documentation, infrastructure, localization, quality assurance, design or marketing.

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Also: LibreOffice 6.2.4 Open-Source Office Suite Released with More Than 100 Bug Fixes

LibreOffice 6.3 Alpha Was Tagged This Week, Stable Expected In August

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LibO

Tagged at the start of the week was LibreOffice 6.3 Alpha 1 as the first step towards the next major release of this cross-platform, open-source office suite.

LibreOffice 6.3 is expected to make its stable debut by mid-August and for that to be the feature freeze and branching is approaching at the end of the month followed by the first beta and then a few release candidates over the next two months. Alpha 1 striked on time so things are looking good at this stage for LibreOffice 6.3.

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Document Foundation Annual Report 2018 and LibreOffice Wrestling With Proprietary Microsoft Formats

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LibO
  • Annual Report 2018: The Document Foundation

    Every year, The Document Foundation produces an Annual Report, detailing its activities in the projects and community. We’ll be posting parts of it here on the blog, while we prepare a final printed version…

    [...]

    In 2017, TDF launched four tenders aimed at sharing knowledge about improving LibreOffice in several strategic areas, where the tasks are beyond the capabilities of independent volunteer developers. In 2018, companies selected to implement two of the tenders reported back on their work.

    Firstly, Collabora was selected for the tender “improve image handling in LibreOffice (#201705-01)”. A new image life-cycle was developed, with simpler memory management for handling images and new swapping strategy. The results were incorporated into the LibreOffice 6.1 release – and a more detailed technical description of the work is on the blog, in order to share knowledge and experience from this project with the developer community and the general public.

    The second tender, “implement HSQLDB binary format import in LibreOffice (#201705-03)”, was also assigned to Collabora and implemented by Tamás Bunth. He developed a mechanism to import database files with high fidelity from the HSQLDB binary file format, used by many existing ODB files, by reading the Java serialization code, and writing a filter to import all data into LibreOffice Base. The objective was to remove the legacy Java/HSQLDB database and to simplify the move to Firebird. More details are provided here.

  • Importing charts from DOCX drawingML group shapes in Writer

    Years ago I posted about a large rework to where Collabora helped a customer to make Writer read the drawingML markup for DOCX shapes. You can read the various benefits of this switch in that article — but similar to other large reworks, this also broke some previously working corner-cases, where test coverage lacked.

LibreOffice and RISC-V Events

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LibO
OSS
  • Bringing people together: German LibreOffice Community Meeting, May 2019

    15 people took part, from across the LibreOffice project: developers, event organisers, infrastructure maintainers, documentation editors, and TDF team and board members. We discussed many topics, which are detailed on the pad (in German), including: the structure of the German project; the various tools that we use (and how to consolidate them); and which events we should attend in the future.

    In addition, we created a list of tasks to focus on in the coming weeks and months, assigned to various members of the community. As we’re a volunteer-led project, we always appreciate help, so if you’ve seen something on the pad that piques your interest, please join our mailing list and give us a hand!

  • RISC-V microconference accepted for the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

    The open nature of the RISC-V ecosystem has allowed contributions from both academia and industry leading to an unprecedented number of new hardware design proposals in a very short time span. Linux support is the key to enabling these new hardware options. Since last year’s Plumbers, many kernel features were added to RISC-V. To name a few, we now have out-of-box 32-bit and eBPF support, some key issues with Linux boot process have been addressed, and hypervisor support is on its way.

Release of LibreOffice 6.1.6

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LibO

The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.1.6, the 6th minor release of the LibreOffice 6.1 family, targeted to users in production environments. This is a more mature version of the software which includes some months of back-ported fixes.

LibreOffice 6.1.6’s change log pages, with a list of bug and regression fixes, are available on TDF’s wiki: https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Releases/6.1.6/RC1 (changed in RC1) https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Releases/6.1.6/RC2 (changed in RC2) and https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Releases/6.1.6/RC3 (changed in RC3).

LibreOffice users are invited to join the community at https://ask.libreoffice.org, where they can get and provide user-to-user support. While TDF can not provide commercial level support, there are guides, manuals, tutorials and HowTos on the website and the wiki.

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New From Mozilla Foundation and Document Foundation

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LibO
Moz/FF
  • Migrate to Fluent

    A couple of weeks ago the Localization Team at Mozilla released the Fluent Syntax specification. As mentioned in our announcement, we already have over 3000 Fluent strings in Firefox. You might wonder how we introduced Fluent to a running project. In this post I?ll detail on how the design of Fluent plays into that effort, and how we pulled it off.

    [...]

    Migrating your code will often be a trivial change from one API to another. Most of your code will get a string and show it, after all. You might convert several different APIs into just one in Fluent, in particular dedicated plural APIs will go away.

    You will also move platform-specific terminology into the localization side, removing conditional code. You should also be able to stop stitching several localized strings together in your application logic.

    As we’ll go through the process here, I’ll show an example of a sentence with a link. The project wants to be really sure the link isn’t broken, so it’s not exposed to localizers at all. This is shortened from an actual example in Firefox, where we link to our privacy policy. We’ll convert to DOM overlays, to separate localizable and non-localizable aspects of the DOM in Fluent. Let’s just look at the HTML code snippet now, and look at the localizations later.

  • Deconstruction of a Failure

    I first want to say that I don’t think MozReview was a total failure. There were many successes, despite the fact that we decommissioned it in favour of another system. Indeed, as I note below, we had quite a big userbase near the end. I am also sure that perspectives on MozReview vary quite a bit among the team that worked on it. These are just the particular failures that I felt most responsible for and, thus, were the most instructive for me.

    That these failures occurred early in my management career was, overall, a good thing. I can say that I learned quite a lot from the project, and it made me a better manager. I apply the lessons I’ve learned to all my team’s projects now, and I try to pass on this knowledge to others, not so they can avoid failure, but so that they can perhaps recognize it earlier than I did.

  • LibOCon Reminders
  • Reminder: LibOCon 2020 Call for Locations

    The Call for Location for LibreOffice Conference 2020 is open until June 30, 2019. It will be the 10th of a series of successful events: Paris, October 2011; Berlin, October 2012; Milan, September 2013; Bern, September 2014; Aarhus, September 2015; Brno, September 2016; Rome, October 2017; Tirana, September 2018, and Almeria, September 2019. During or around the event we will celebrate the 10th anniversary of the project, which was announced on September 28, 2010.

    The Call for Locations opens well in advance as TDF Board of Directors wants to to give the event organizers the opportunity to attend this year’s conference – in Almeria, Spain, September 11 to 13, 2019 – to familiarize with the community and the structure of the event. For historical and practical reasons, the LibreOffice Conference takes place between September and November, with a preference for September.

LibreOffice: BASIC and Python, OOXML Problems and Roman Kuznetsov

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LibO
  • New Help: Copy BASIC and PYTHON code to Clipboard on a Click

    The next release for LibreOffice will have a small but handy improvement for every macro developer, either experienced or beginner.

    Hover the mouse on BASIC and Python code in the new Help pages and a tip shows that when you click your mouse, the code exerpt is copied in the system clipboard. You can paste in the BASIC IDE (Integrated Development environment) or any other text application in your system.

  • XLSX interoperability: pivot tables-related improvements

    These changes allow our customers, and the whole LibreOffice user community, to enjoy better interoperability when using XLSX format. They will be available in LibreOffice version 6.3 later this summer; and they are immediately available for our customers in this week’s Collabora Office 6.0 update 28.

  • LibreOffice Community Member Monday: Roman Kuznetsov

    Your nickname in the LibreOffice project is “Kompilainenn” – where did that come from?

    Oh, it’s simple: one day I was trying to compile the Linux kernel for my old and slow PC. And I came up with my current nickname: Kompilainenn Big Grin

    So tell us a bit about yourself – where you’re from, where you live, how to find you on social media, and what do you do in your spare time!

    I’m a member of The Document Foundation from Russia, and I live in Lipetsk – it’s an industrial metallurgical city. You can find me on Telegram as @Kompilainenn, and on IRC in the channel #libreoffice-ru on Freenode. I have a blog about LibreOffice in Russian: the blog has strange address with the prefix “anti”, but in reality the blog isn’t against LibreOffice Wink

Apache OpenOffice and LibreOffice in the News

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LibO
OOo
  • Apache OpenOffice: The Free Open-Source Office Software Suite

    Apache OpenOffice is available in diverse languages and works well on all common computer systems. It is primarily developed for Windows, Linux, and macOS with ports to other operating systems. The default file format for this software is the OpenDocument Format (ODF), an ISO/IEC standard. However, it can also read and write an extensive variety of other file formats, with specific attention to those from Microsoft Office (i.e. DOCX, XLS, PPT, and XML). The software can be downloaded and used for any purpose and yes, it’s Free of Charge.

  • Get a Microsoft Office-style suite for free

    Before we get into the details of how to download LibreOffice, we want to tell you about Capterra, which is a great website for comparing software solutions for home and business use. Even before they became a sponsor of Komando.com, we used them ALL. THE. TIME.

    Check out how you can do side-by-side comparisons of spreadsheet programs in the screen shot below. Capterra has hundreds of software comparisons that include professional and user reviews.

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    There are many different ways to solve problems in computing. You might "brute force" your way to a solution by calculating as many possibilities as you can, or you might take a procedural approach and carefully establish the known factors that influence the correct answer. In constraint programming, a problem is viewed as a series of limitations on what could possibly be a valid solution. This paradigm can be applied to effectively solve a group of problems that can be translated to variables and constraints or represented as a mathematic equation. In this way, it is related to the Constraint Satisfaction Problem (CSP). Using a declarative programming style, it describes a general model with certain properties. In contrast to the imperative style, it doesn't tell how to achieve something, but rather what to achieve. Instead of defining a set of instructions with only one obvious way to compute values, constraint programming declares relationships between variables within constraints. A final model makes it possible to compute the values of variables regardless of direction or changes. Thus, any change in the value of one variable affects the whole system (i.e., all other variables), and to satisfy defined constraints, it leads to recomputing the other values.

  • Samuel Sutch: Why Python Has Become an Industry Favorite Among Programmers

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Linux commands to display your hardware information

There are many reasons you might need to find out details about your computer hardware. For example, if you need help fixing something and post a plea in an online forum, people will immediately ask you for specifics about your computer. Or, if you want to upgrade your computer, you'll need to know what you have and what you can have. You need to interrogate your computer to discover its specifications. Alternatively, you could open up the box and read the labels on the disks, memory, and other devices. Or you could enter the boot-time panels—the so-called UEFI or BIOS panels. Just hit the proper program function key during the boot process to access them. These two methods give you hardware details but omit software information. Or, you could issue a Linux line command. Wait a minute… that sounds difficult. Why would you do this? Read more

Android Leftovers

BlackWeb 1.2

BlackWeb is a penetration and security testing distribution based on Debian. The project's website presents the distribution's features as follows: BlackWeb is a Linux distribution aimed at advanced penetration testing and security auditing. BlackWeb contains several hundred tools which are geared towards various information security tasks, such as penetration testing, security research, computer forensics and reverse engineering. Starting from an appropriately configured LXDE desktop manager it offers stability and speed. BlackWeb has been designed with the aim of achieving the maximum performance and minimum consumption of resources. There are 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit (x86_64) builds of BlackWeb available on the distribution's website. I downloaded the 64-bit build which is 2.6GB in size. Booting from the media brings up a menu asking if we would like to try BlackWeb's live desktop, run the installer or run the graphical installer. Taking the live desktop options presents us with a graphical login screen where we can sign in with the username "root" and the password "blackweb". Read more