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LibO

The Renaissance of the Renaissance Project?

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OOo

standardsandfreedom.net: Forgive the title above; but these past days we started to receive more and more questions about the OpenOffice.org Renaissance Project and whether we would continue its works and implement its changes.

LibreOffice Is Taking Shape With Third Beta

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pcworld.com: It's been less than two months since the Document Foundation announced that it was launching its own "fork" of the OpenOffice.org productivity software suite, but already its new LibreOffice alternative is beginning to take shape.

LibreOffice: "It is wrong to blame Oracle"

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derstandard.at: Novell's Michael Meeks talks about the reasons for the fork, the first few weeks of the new project and plans for the future

LibreOffice Rethinks the Office Suite

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earthweb.com: LibreOffice only forked from OpenOffice.org six weeks ago. Already, however, news about its future directions is starting to trickle out. The details are sometimes sketchy, but they suggest that LibreOffice and OpenOffice.org could diverge more quickly than most observers imagined.

LibreOffice Logo

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thorwil.wordpress: The LibreOffice project has a preliminary logo. The symbol aside, I see some issues with the type.

It’s the Document, stupid!

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Software
OOo

standardsandfreedom.net: Today the Document Foundation has issued a press release that marks the beginning of something exciting; but it’s likely that not a lot of people will understand what’s being explained through the multiple layers of buzz and general statements that were made.

Interviews: The Document Foundation's Jacqueline Rahemipour

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  • Interviews: The Document Foundation's Jacqueline Rahemipour
  • LibreOffice: Document Foundation Steering Committee Public Phone Conference 12-Nov-2010

Office Clones: It's About to Get Complicated

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Software
OOo

pcmag.com: Those looking for some alternatives to the pricey Microsoft Office have looked to Google for its small suite of online apps and OpenOffice, an open-source Office suite "owned" by Oracle and comprised of clones of the Microsoft product. This is about to get more complicated.

Why Oracle Wants LibreOffice to Succeed

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itworld.com: This accomplishes two things: those who leave can be replaced by more Oracle-friendly developers. Those who stay will have re-committed themselves to the success of OpenOffice.org, just by staying. Ah, but there's another benefit here left unsaid:

Go LibreOffice !!!

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janimo.blogspot: Up until two months ago, had I been asked the question "Which is the open source project that you are least likely to ever contribute to?", I would have, without hesitation answered OpenOffice.org.

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More in Tux Machines

Devices: Fairwaves, FriendlyElec, Ataribox and Tizen

  • Low-cost embeddable SDR occupies a mini-PCIe card
    The Fairwaves “XTRX” mini-PCIe SDR card is a low-cost embeddable SDR card aimed at high data rate apps including 4G/5G and “massive” MIMO. Fairwaves Inc.’s “XTRX” SDR mini-PCIe card, which launched on Nov. 30 at Crowd Supply, has earned more than 80 percent of its funding goal with one month remaining. The company claims the full sized mini-PCIe XTRX card (30 x 51mm) is the smallest commercially available SDR card. For comparison, the USB-interfaced LimeSDR Mini and RTL-SDR boards measure 69 x 31.4mm and 40 x 60mm, respectively.
  • Tiny quad-core Linux SBCs slim down and get an RPi-like carrier
    FriendlyElec has unveiled COM-like variants of its tiny, low-cost quad-core, Allwinner H3- and H5-based NanoPi Neo and Neo2 SBCs, plus an RPi style carrier. FriendlyElec’s new $8 “NanoPi Neo Core” and $25 “NanoPi Neo Core2” boards are low-profile variants of the company’s earlier 40 x 40mm NanoPi Neo and NanoPi Neo 2 SBCs, but with their large, topside USB and Ethernet connectors replaced by a third dual-row pin header. As a result, the new boards are more like computer-on-modules (COMs) than single-board computers (SBCs), in that they’re meant to be combined with off-the-shelf or custom carrier boards, such as FriendlyElec’s RPi 3-like Mini Shield (see farther below). [...] Operating system — Ubuntu Core; Armbian; U-boot bootloader
  • You Can Pre-Order Ataribox Very Soon, But The Thing Is Still Sort Of A Mystery
  • Sling TV now available on 2017 models of Samsung Smart TVs
  • Give your Gear S3 and Gear Sport a Christmas makeover with these FREE watchfaces

Security: Bolt, Updates, NIST, Starbucks

Software: Top 5 Linux Music Players, Udeler, and Thomas

  • Top 5 Linux Music Players
    No matter what you do, chances are you enjoy a bit of music playing in the background. Whether you’re a coder, system administrator, or typical desktop user, enjoying good music might be at the top of your list of things you do on the desktop. And, with the holidays upon us, you might wind up with some gift cards that allow you to purchase some new music. If your music format of choice is of a digital nature (mine happens to be vinyl) and your platform is Linux, you’re going to want a good GUI player to enjoy that music. Fortunately, Linux has no lack of digital music players. In fact, there are quite a few, most of which are open source and available for free. Let’s take a look at a few such players, to see which one might suit your needs.
  • Udeler – A Cross-Platform Udemy Course Video Downloader
    I assume many of our readers are familiar with a number of online study education centers. Some of them focus on programming and computer science related topics alone while others have a wider topic range. Some websites are completely free or paid, and other offer both paid and free courses. Just like Khan Academy and Code Academy, Udemy is no newcomer to this domain. It’s a website where you can learn a variety of courses online at your own pace with some of them being available for free.
  • Thomas – A Simple Pomodoro Timer App for Linux
    One of the best methods you can implement to be more productive is time management. It allows you to keep track of how much time it takes you to get work done and how often you exceed your deadlines. Timer apps these days seem to have chosen a favorite technique to help users stay sharp and productive as is evident in apps like Gnome Pomodoro and Take a Break. The Pomodoro technique is a common pick.

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