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LibO

LibreOffice 5.2 Officially Released with Interface Refinements, New Features

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LibO

Today, August 3, 2016, The Document Foundation non-profit organization has had the great pleasure of announcing the general availability of the LibreOffice 5.2 open-source and cross-platform office suite software.

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More on Canonical in the Document Foundation

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LibO
Ubuntu
  • Canonical Takes a Seat On The Document Foundation’s Advisory Board
  • The Document Foundation welcomes Canonical to the project Advisory Board
  • Canonical Joins The Document Foundation Advisory Board

    The Document Foundation today announced that Ubuntu parent company Canonical has joined The Document Foundation Advisory Board. The foundation said Canonical is to provide "experience and insights" to increase the use of LibreOffice in the enterprise and government. Canonical joins the likes of KDE, GNOME, Red Hat, SUSE, and Google on the board.

    The board's main purpose is to represent the foundation's sponsors and their needs to the Board of Directors, although the BoD isn't under obligation to accept or act on any proposals made by the advisory board. The BoD does, on occasion, solicit advice and guidance from the advisory board and the advisory board does make proposals on behalf of their members. Some of the other members on the Advisory Board include those listed above as well as the Free Software Foundation, Collabora, Intel, the French government, CloudOn, City of Munich government, and AMD.

Canonical Joins The Document Foundation's LibreOffice Project Advisory Board

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LibO
Ubuntu

Today, July 26, 2016, Canonical and The Document Foundation (TDF) announced that the company behind the popular Ubuntu operating system had joined the LibreOffice project Advisory Board.

If you're using the Ubuntu Linux OS on your personal computer, you are aware of the fact that the award-winning LibreOffice office suite is installed by default. Canonical chose to use LibreOffice as the default office suite for its widely-used GNU/Linux operating system since the first release of the open-source software in early 2011.

Now that Canonical announced the availability of Snaps as universal binary packages for Ubuntu and other supported GNU/Linux distributions, many application developers decided to offer their software in the Snap package format, and it looks like The Document Foundation is among the first to adopt the latest Snappy technologies for LibreOffice.

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LibreOffice News

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LibO
  • LIBOCon: get around Brno

    Yesterday I added Get around Brno page to the LibreOffice Conference website. There you can find comprehensive information about public transport in Brno, how to buy tickets, how to get to the hotel/venue if you arrive by train/bus/car/plane etc. All accompanied with maps and pictures of described places. So hopefully no one will get lost on their way to the hotel or venue, or struggle purchasing tickets.

  • LibreOffice developer interview: Winfried Donkers

    In this week’s developer interview, we talk to Winfried Donkers, a Dutch coder who has been using LibreOffice (and its predecessors) for almost two decades, and today works on Calc.

LibreOffice News

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LibO

From Microsoft to LibreOffice: How Italy's military is starting its march to open source

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LibO
Microsoft

In the past few years a growing number of Italian public bodies have chosen to ditch proprietary software for open source.

But most of these decisions have been taken at the local level, while in general the country's central government has seemed more reluctant to follow the open-source path.

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Giving Linux and LibreOffice a Try for Your Home Office

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GNU
LibO
Linux

Running your home office on a tight budget? There's a way to get all of your software—operating system (OS), productivity suite, scores of applications—completely free. It'll cost you, but not in the way you might think.

This life-changing alternative is Linux, which gives you more flexibility, more have-it-your-way customization, and more control than Windows or OS X users could ever dream of. I caution that it'll cost you because it's decidedly not for everyone. While it's far friendlier today than it was a year or even six months ago, Linux still requires you to invest, nay, enjoy some time spent setting up and tinkering with your PC.

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Also: New LibreOffice Vulnerability Patched in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Debian and Arch Linux

LibreOffice 5.1.4 Office Suite Now Available for Download with over 130 Bugfixes

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LibO

Today, June 23, 2016, The Document Foundation's Italo Vignoli has been happy to inform Softpedia about the immediate availability for download of the LibreOffice 5.1.4 "Fresh" open-source office suite.

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Also: LibreOffice Online Is Now Ready for ownCloud Enterprise, Thanks to Collabora

LibreOffice News

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LibO
  • Faster Rendering Appears To Be Coming For LibreOffice

    Some rendering speed improvements have been worked on recently for the LibreOffice open-source office suite and are now present in LO Git.

  • Document Liberation Project: progress so far in 2016

    If you haven’t heard of the Document Liberation Project (DLP) before, we made a short video explaining what it does and why it’s important. In summary: it supports development of software libraries to read documents from many (usually proprietary) applications. If you’ve ever opened a file generated by Apple Pages, WordPerfect or Microsoft Works in LibreOffice, you’ve benefitted from the hard work of the DLP team. And DLP libraries are used in many other prominent FOSS tools such as Inkscape and Scribus as well.

LibreOffice 5.2 Beta 2 Now Available as a Snap for Ubuntu Linux, Other Distros

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LibO

GNU/Linux developer Björn Michaelsen reported on June 14, 2016, managing to package the latest Beta build of the upcoming LibreOffice 5.2 office suite as a Snap package for various GNU/Linux distributions, including Ubuntu.

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More in Tux Machines

More of today's howtos

GNOME News: Black Lab Drops GNOME and Further GNOME Experiments in Meson

  • Ubuntu-Based Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 Drops GNOME 3 for MATE Desktop
    Coming about two weeks after the release of Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11, which is based on the Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system using the HWE (hardware enablement) kernel from Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 appears to be an unexpected maintenance update addressing a few important issues reported by users lately.
  • 3.26 Developments
    My approach to development can often differ from my peers. I prefer to spend the early phase of a cycle doing lots of prototypes of various features we plan to implement. That allows me to have the confidence necessary to know early in the cycle what I can finish and where to ask for help.
  • Further experiments in Meson
    Meson is definitely getting more traction in GNOME (and other projects), with many components adding support for it in parallel to autotools, or outright switching to it. There are still bugs, here and there, and we definitely need to improve build environments — like Continuous — to support Meson out of the box, but all in all I’m really happy about not having to deal with autotools any more, as well as being able to build the G* stack much more quickly when doing continuous integration.

Fedora and Red Hat

Debian and Derivatives

  • Reproducible Builds: week 108 in Stretch cycle
  • Debuerreotype
    The project is named “Debuerreotype” as an homage to the photography roots of the word “snapshot” and the daguerreotype process which was an early method of taking photographs. The essential goal is to create “photographs” of a minimal Debian rootfs, so the name seemed appropriate (even if it’s a bit on the “mouthful” side).
  • The end of Parsix GNU/Linux
    The Debian-based Parsix distribution has announced that it will be shutting down six months after the Debian "Stretch" release.
  • Privacy-focused Debian 9 'Stretch' Linux-based operating system Tails 3.0 reaches RC status
    If you want to keep the government and other people out of your business when surfing the web, Tails is an excellent choice. The Linux-based operating system exists solely for privacy purposes. It is designed to run from read-only media such as a DVD, so that there are limited possibilities of leaving a trail. Of course, even though it isn't ideal, you can run it from a USB flash drive too, as optical drives have largely fallen out of favor with consumers. Today, Tails achieves an important milestone. Version 3.0 reaches RC status -- meaning the first release candidate (RC1). In other words, it may soon be ready for a stable release -- if testing confirms as much. If you want to test it and provide feedback, you can download the ISO now.