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Why Use LibreOffice in Education and Celebrating Document Freedom Day 2020

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LibO
OOo
  • LibreOffice: A great choice for schools and education

    Because LibreOffice is free and open source software, students and teachers can download and install it on as many machines as they like, without worrying about license fees, subscriptions or audits. If you’re a teacher, you can be sure that your students won’t suddenly be locked out of their documents for not renewing a subscription. They can keep working, as long as they like!

  • Document Freedom Day 2020

    When you save a document on your computer, it is stored in a computer file. Whether it is a text file, a picture, a video or any other kind of work, it is saved with a specific coded structure, known as the file format.

    To be able to share data, software programs must be able to communicate with each other. It implies that no barrier whatsoever may hinder the exchange of data and the related write or read operations. For such a seamless exchange to be possible, software programs are required to be “interoperable”.

    Interoperability is guaranteed when it relies on open standards, i.e. public technical specifications, freely usable by everyone, without restriction nor compensation, and maintained by an open decision-making process. File formats based on these open standards are “Open Formats”.

    Where software interoperability is set aside, or if a program editor does not give access to the key information for interoperability or if the file design recipe is kept undisclosed, or if the file design recipe is available but is not followed by the program, file formats are considered to be “closed” and do not allow interoperability. For a software user, choosing between an Open File Format or a closed one has a deep impact on the ownership of and the access to his/her own data and their availability over time.

Season of Docs 2020 and Document Freedom Day 2020

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LibO
Google
OSS
OOo
  • Announcing Season of Docs 2020

    Season of Docs brings technical writers and open source projects together for a few months to work on open source documentation. 2019 was the first year of Season of Docs, bringing together open source organizations and technical writers to create 44 successful documentation projects!

  • Announcing Season of Docs 2020

    Google Open Source has announced the 2020 edition of Season of Docs, a program to connect open source projects with technical writers to improve documentation. Open source organizations may apply from April 14-May 4. Once mentoring organizations and technical writers are connected, there will be a month long community bonding period, beginning August 11. Writers will then work with mentors to complete documentation projects by the December 6 deadline.

  • Paint a Dove for Document Freedom Day

    Help us celebrate the Twelfth Anniversary of Document Freedom Day by making a paper dove!

    Download the dove template and the instructions from this link: https://tdf.io/dfd1, and once you are done with your dove take a picture of it and upload your photo using this link: https://tdf.io/dfd2.

Chromium and LibreOffice updates

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GNU
LibO
Linux
Google

Due to the Corona (COVID-19) crisis, Google decided to postpone the introduction of Chromium 81 to the stable channel. Understandably due to the challenges created by sending most developers home for their own safety and protection, which is a cause for less efficient work schedules.
Instead, there is an increased focus on addressing security related issues in Chromium 80 and releasing those in rapid succession. After all, any crisis attracts the worst of humankind to mess with the more gullible part of the population and browser based phishing and hack attempts are on the rise.

And so, yesterday there was another version upgrade, and I built the new chromium packages for Slackware 14.2 and -current already. The chromium-80.0.3987.149 release can be downloaded from any mirror – or upgraded using slackpkg/slackpkg+ if you use that.

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LibreOffice 6.4.2 Released with More Than 90 Fixes

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LibO
Security

Available for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows platforms, the LibreOffice 6.4.2 release is here three weeks after the first point release to address more than 90 bug fixes across various of its core components as detailed here and here.

This update is recommended to everyone who has the latest LibreOffice 6.4 office suite installed on their personal computers as it will probably improve the stability and reliability of the software.

However, The Document Foundation doesn’t recommend the deployment of the LibreOffice 6.4 series on enterprise environments as it represents the bleeding edge in term of features.

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LibreOffice: Document Freedom in 2020

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LibO

In the age of the cloud, most people think they don’t have “real” files any more, as these have been replaced by pointers in an online system. They don’t realise they have lost their freedom until they download the file to edit it on their laptop. At that point, they realize that without buying a proprietary office suite they are unable to access their very own contents, as these are hostage of a proprietary file format. Something that wouln’t have happened if they had chosen the standard Open Document Format (ODF), which can be fully implemented by any software vendor without special permission, and without having to reverse engineer an obfuscated pseudo-standard format owned by a single company.

Back in 2012, European Commission Vice President Neelie Kroes said: “Open standards create competition, lead to innovation, and save money,” while announcing the publication of a new policy to help public authorities avoid dependence on a single ICT supplier. At the time, following the recommendations of the new approach against lock-in could save the EU’s public sector more than € 1.1 billion a year.

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Also: Community Member Monday: Tomoyuki Kubota

LibreOffice Writer: Arranging Page Styles And Different Page Numbering

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LibO
Reviews

Page Styles are page designs. It is similar concept to Headings and Paragraph Styles but applied to pages instead. With them, you can make different page numbering in one document such as Roman first and Arabic later just like in academic writings. Alternatively, you can also make a document with different page orientations and/or margins as you wish. You can either use existing or create new ones of them. However, the secret of success in using Page Styles is a thing called Manual Break. This tutorial explains step by step to use them with examples. Enjoy writing!

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LibreOffice at InstallFest 2020, Prague, 29 February – 1 March

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LibO

Our Czech LibreOffice community attends events around the country, spreading the word about LibreOffice, free software and open standards. Today, Petr Valach reports back from InstallFest, which took place on 29 February and 1 March. InstallFest focuses on GNU/Linux, helping new users to install the operating system, but also has lectures and stands for many other free and open source software projects…

For the first time this year, the LibreOffice community attended the InstallFest conference. The following is a summary of the knowledge and insights we gained there…

The vast majority of visitors were from younger generations – often high school or even elementary school pupils. The new mobile application from Collabora, released just a few days before – and surprisingly, almost no one knew about it – aroused great interest. Collabora Office Mobile has proven to be a highly featureful and functional alternative for the desktop version – although it has a limited range of features, but its capabilities are surprising.

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LibreOffice Open Badges, Collabora's Work on LibreOffice and Remote Work at Collabora

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LibO

  • Announcing Open Badges for LibreOffice contributors!

    LibreOffice is made by volunteers and certified developers across the globe, and today we’re announcing a new system to credit their work and show appreciation: Open Badges. So what are they?

    In a nutshell, Open Badges are PNG images that are awarded to contributors for reaching a certain threshold – such as a number of commits to the codebase, or answering questions on Ask LibreOffice. But these images are something special: they contain metadata describing the contributor’s work, which can be verified using an external service. Open Badges are used by other free software projects, such as Fedora.

    We at The Document Foundation – the non-profit entity behind LibreOffice – will start issuing customised badges to contributors, who can then proudly display them on websites or social media. And because of the embedded metadata, contributors can use the badges as proof of their work. If you’ve been a long-time contributor to LibreOffice and are in the job market, use your badge to highlight your involvement in a large open source project!

  • My hack week at Collabora: (start of) padded numbering in Writer

    Padded numbering is a style where you insert 0 characters in front of an otherwise normal (Arabic) numbering, making sure that the result always has at least N characters. Up to now, you had to number your content manually to have this effect, while Word supports this feature.

    OOXML supports padding up to 2, 3, 4 and 5 characters. Padding up to 2 characters is the older feature, supported in DOC and RTF as well, so I focused on that piece.

  • Why remote working can be good for people, business and environment

    One of the primary contributions of the open source community to the world is a system that allows random people from around the world to work together to solve complex problems, so it is no surprise that Collabora has been from the get-go a geographically distributed company. Our consultancy team of Open Source professionals is distributed across 2 offices - Cambridge, UK and Montreal, Canada - and remote based in more than 30 different countries around the globe.

    Here at Collabora, we trust our people to work remotely, we give them full responsibility for their output, and we believe it helps create an even stronger internal culture and comes with some other positives.

LibreOffice 7.0's Qt5 Support To Offer HiDPI Scaling

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LibO

The support uses a DPI scaling approach similar to what is used by GTK in scaling of the Cairo surface. Developer Luca Carlon acknowledges "the current result is far from perfect, which you can see with the various graphics glitches" but at least isn't crashing or other woes. Hopefully by the time of the LibreOffice 7.0.0 debut in August this Qt5 HiDPI support will be better positioned. LibreOffice 7.0 so far has also been baking some performance improvements for the Impress and Draw components, enhancements to Writer's Navigator, and other enhancements for leading the open-source office suite race.

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TDF new Board of Directors

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LibO
OOo

The new Board of Directors of The Document Foundation has just started the two year term on February 18, 2020. Members are: Michael Meeks, Thorsten Behrens, Franklin Weng, Daniel Rodriguez, Cor Nouws, Lothar Becker and Emiliano Vavassori. Deputies are: Nicolas Christener and Paolo Vecchi.

Five people have been elected for the first time to the Board of Directors: Daniel Armando Rodriguez from Posadas in Argentina; Lothar Becker from Karlsruhe in Germany; Emiliano Vavassori from Bergamo in Italy; Nicholas Christener from Bern in Switzerland; and Paolo Vecchi from Luxembourg (in Luxembourg).

During the first meeting of the Board of Directors, the nine members have elected Lothar Becker as Chairman and Franklin Weng as Deputy Chairman. In the meantime, also the responsibilities and areas of oversight have been discussed and decided.

At the same time, six people – who have served as board members and deputies during the previous term(s) – have left the board, but will continue their activity as TDF Members: Marina Latini, Chairwoman; Björn Michaelsen, Deputy Chairman; Eike Rathke, Member; and Jan Holešovský, Simon Phipps and Osvaldo Gervasi, Deputies.

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Also: QA/Dev Report: February 2020

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IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

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