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LibreOffice 6.2 RC3 is ready for testing

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LibO

The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce LibreOffice 6.2 RC3 is ready for testing!

LibreOffice 6.2 will be released as final in a week from now and LibreOffice 6.2 RC3 represents the last pre-release before the final release since the development of version 6.2 started in mid May, 2018. See the release plan for more information.
You can find the list of bugs fixed in this pre-release here and the list of new features included in LibreOffice 6.2 in the release notes.

LibreOffice 6.2 RC3 is already available for downloaded in this link, for Linux, MacOS and Windows.

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The saga begins …

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Development
LibO

As you might have seen, we have now run four C++ sessions to get started with C++ and LibreOffice development. The origin of this actually happened already at the last LibreOffice Hackfest in Munich where Izabela, Mike, Anxhelo and me conspired on the idea. We also started to recruit LibreOffice developers as mentors right there and Xisco joined us soon.

As the lectures discuss the basics of data structures and C++ I started to create some patches against LibreOffice to show how to start with simple things in the LibreOffice build based on the examples from the lecture, but in the environment of LibreOffice and with some of its framework and conventions...

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Also: LibreOffice monthly recap: January 2019

LibreOffice 6.2 Slated for Release on February 7, Will Introduce a New Tabbed UI

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LibO

So the big news we want to share with you today is the LibreOffice 6.2 office suite will be officially released in about a week from the moment of writing this article, on Thursday, February 7, 2019. It will be available for all supported platforms, including Linux, Mac, and Windows.

As expected, we'll have a detailed story prepared on the LibreOffice 6.2 launch day to tell you all about its new features and improves, but, as a sneak peek, we'd like to inform you now that the upcoming release brings a new tabbed UI called Notebookbar, which you can see in action in the video and screenshot gallery below.

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LibreOffice Extensions and GNU Guile at FOSDEM

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GNU
LibO
  • What About A Review Of LibreOffice Extensions?

    I made a quick test with a currently published LibreOffice extension and it seemed there were no accurate review of the file before it and the project were published. Sad situation.

  • GNU Guile at FOSDEM

    GNU Guile will be present this year again at FOSDEM, which is just a few days away.

LibreOffice 6.2 Quality Assurance and LibreOffice on Chromebooks

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LibO
  • LibreOffice 6.2 community focus: Quality Assurance

    LibreOffice’s worldwide community of volunteers and certified developers has been working hard on the many updates in LibreOffice 6.2. But while shiny new features are great for users, it’s important that they’re well-tested too! That’s where our QA (Quality Assurance) community comes into play. So today we talk to Xisco Fauli, The Document Foundation’s QA engineer, about the upcoming release…

  • LibreOffice on Chromebooks

    Until recently, Chromebooks could browse the Web and run dedicated ChromeOS and Android applications, and that was that. But things are changing now since Google announced Crostini, a technology to run arbitrary Linux applications on ChromeOS.

    What you get, in short, is a Linux distribution running in a virtual machine. It is sandboxed, but with some channels set up between the virtual machine and the surrounding ChromeOS, so that e.g., icons of applications installed in the Linux VM show up in the ChromeOS launcher, and windows opened from within the VM are integrated with the overall ChromeOS desktop.

    The default Linux distribution provided by Google is a Debian 9, and one should be able to also plug other flavours of Linux, at least in theory. But we can install applications as flatpaks there, at which point the exact Linux distribution becomes rather irrelevant, anyway.

A day in the office ... without Office

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LibO
Reviews

First, let me give you a brief overview of my typical "office" setup. Normally, I write fiction in LibreOffice Writer, and by that I mean books and short stories, not website content. There's no need for any great embellishment, just text. When I do need to send these files to editors, agents and alike, they are rinsed through Microsoft Word 2010 (the best of the bunch, including the more recent versions).

Non-fiction work, i.e. technical books fall into two buckets: 1) LaTeX and LyX for entirely self-published items 2) the likes of my Problem Solving and System Administration Ethics titles are done and conceived almost entirely in Microsoft Word, because they require a lot more precision and focus, and ultimately, they need to be easily accessible by the publisher. This is a no-nonsense constraint. I cannot have any styling lost converting files between different formats.

If I need to do graphics (including diagrams and alike), I will use all sorts of tools, including even something like Octave, but also Powerpoint, GIMP, and other programs. Equations are best done either using the built-in editor, or the aforementioned LaTeX. Now that covers the writing part. There's also collaboration.

Here, I decided to try a bold thing - which is part of this experiment. On the System Administration Ethics book, I am collaborating with a friend in a different country, so we are using the Internetz to communicate. We also decided to use Google Docs to share files, comment and edit each other's writing and such. Then, I've also recently configured a Slimbook Pro2 & Kubuntu setup, i.e. Linux, i.e. not Windows. That means that such a system cannot use locally installed Microsoft software - the cloud-based Microsoft Office Online is a really great option though, plus, as luck would have it, it also works just fine on Linux. Now there.

And so, LibreOffice and Google Docs gain even more focus due to these Linux-based restrictions, but not only. Finally, you have the full context for this experiment. Spurred by actual usage needs - and with meaningful, months-long projects at hand - I decided to examine the tech landscape, and you're now enjoying the fruits of my labor. Also worth reading Slimbook reports in parallel, that is.

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LibreOffice: LibreOffice 6.2 Finished, C++ Workshops and Conditional Formatting in LibreOffice Calc

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LibO

Get free programs to edit photos, send email and more

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LibO
OSS

Even better, LibreOffice can open and edit the documents you made in Office and can save new files in Office formats. LibreOffice is also compatible with the other document formats, like OpenDocument Format (ODF) and PDF.

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LibreOffice: First Quarter Without Work For TDF, Mohamed Trabelsi and Jim Raykowski, Report on the New LIbreOffice Help Pages Online Editor

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LibO
  • First Quarter Without Work For TDF

    I did pour volunteer work for LibreOffice and its antecessor for about sixteen years. I worked in different roles for the open source project during this long periode. The project consumed a lot of my spare time. But then I experienced a ‘nice’ communication experience inside the community, that showed me a lack of respect for my project work, its value and also for my person. Thus I decided to completely stop my pour volunteer work within the project three month ago. The LibreOffice extensions and templates website (extensions.libreoffice.org) lost its maintainer and project reviewer since that time.

  • Community Member Monday: Mohamed Trabelsi and Jim Raykowski

    I’ve been living in Kobe, Japan for three years now. I was Master student at Kobe Institute of Computing for two years, then I did internship for six months at iCRAFT Corp, a Japanese IT company in Kobe. And now I work as a Network Engineer at the same company.

    Outside of work, I’m usually playing soccer, watching movies, traveling around Japan with some friends and family, and going for some volunteering activities nearby.

  • Report on the New LIbreOffice Help Pages Online Editor

    The Javascript editor used is CodeMirror and was carefully selected by Mike Saunders who also set the initial confguration for working with XML and our XML dialect XHP, as well as configured the autocompletion features.

    The XHP snippets were originally designed for the KDE Kate editor and ported to the online editor.

LibreOffice: Focus on Design and LibreOffice 6.2 RC2

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LibO
  • LibreOffice 6.2 community focus: Design

    LibreOffice 6.2 is due to be released at the end of this month, and many communities in the project have been working hard on new features. Today we talk to Heiko Tietze, The Document Foundation’s UX designer, about the upcoming release…

  • LibreOffice 6.2 RC2 is ready for testing

    The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce LibreOffice 6.2 RC2 is ready for testing!

    LibreOffice 6.2 will be released as final at the beginning of February, 2019, being LibreOffice 6.2 RC2 the forth pre-release since the development of version 6.2 started in mid May, 2018. See the release plan. Check the release notes to find the new features included in this version of LibreOffice.

    LibreOffice 6.2 RC2 can be downloaded from here, and it’s available for Linux, MacOS and Windows.

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More in Tux Machines

Why Debian Is the Gold Standard of Upstream Desktop Linux

If you don’t follow the fortunes of Linux distributions, you might think that the days of Debian’s dominance are long since gone. However, superficial appearances can be deceiving. Not only does Debian consistently appear in the top ten of Distrowatch’s page hit ranking, it’s used as the base of the majority of other distributions as well, far eclipsing rivals like Fedora and Red Hat or openSuse. In fact, Debian might be said to be the most influential distro ever. That may seem an overstatement, but the figures are hard to argue with. For at least eight years, Debian has been by far the most dominant distribution. Some details of its dominance have changed, but the overall pattern has been constant. Without Debian, modern Linux would be vastly different. Read more

Games: It Stares Back, Receiver, Beyond Blue, NARWHAR Project Hornwhale, Buoyancy, Overcooked and Shing!

  • It Stares Back, an RTS with a really wild style will be coming to Linux

    Always on the lookout for my next strategy game fix, I recently came across It Stares Back after it pulled my in due to the wild visuals. Currently, it's only available for Windows in Early Access on Steam. However, the developer confirmed to me on the Steam forum that it's planned for Linux just like their last game, Castle Battles. The Linux version should come once the game is complete.

  • Receiver, the experimental FPS from Wolfire Games had a big update recently

    Receiver is a name I've not heard in a long time, the indie FPS released back in 2013 by Wolfire Games and it's just seen a big update. There's no new enemies or levels in this update, instead Wolfire focused on the tech that runs the game. In this case it's the Unity game engine and they gave it quite a big update. It also adds in some graphical prettiness and other bits like that.

  • Ocean exploration game Beyond Blue has a new story trailer and voice cast reveal

    Beyond Blue, the near-future ocean exploration game from E-Line Media (publisher of Never Alone) has a new story teaser. If you've not heard of it before, this is not some survival game like Subnautica. Instead, it's a game about exploring the depths of our oceans. Think of it like Blue Planet: The Game, that sums it up quite well especially since they've teamed up with BBC Studios (who did the Blue Planet documentary).

  • NARWHAR Project Hornwhale, a really wacky shoot 'em up that reminds me of the Amiga days

    The developer of NARWHAR Project Hornwhale emailed in recently about their new arcade style shoot 'em up being released with Linux support. It's a bit wild. I'll admit the name, along with the setting of this thoroughly made me chuckle to no end. Space Narwhals that rule with an iron fist, with you playing as one of two Rays that shoot lasers? The damn Narwhals took away all the free milkshake, so naturally a rebellion happened. What's not to love about such a crazy setting?

  • Buoyancy, a city-builder where you manage a floating city has a Linux test build up

    Sometimes when you ask if a game is coming to Linux it's a no, others say it's planned and when it's Buoyancy the developer just puts up a build soon after asking. Yep, that's what happened here. After asking about Linux support on Steam, developer replied to say "yes". When asking if they knew when, they went ahead and uploaded a build. If only it was always that easy…

  • The latest Overcooked! 2 expansion sounds more crazy than ever with the Carnival of Chaos

    Overcooked! 2 is no doubt one of the best, most hilarious and most infuriating co-op experiences around all in one. It just got bigger again too, with another great sound DLC out now.

  • Fantastic looking beat 'em up Shing! confirmed to be releasing for Linux

    One we completely missed from Gamescom is Shing!, a new beat 'em up from developer Mass Creation releasing next year and it looks like it's going to be a lot of fun. Curiously, it appeared recently in my Steam searching with a SteamOS/Linux icon but the store page only has Windows system requirements. When going to message the developer, I checked the Steam forum and as expected someone asked about Linux support. The reply from the developer was a very clear "Yes - Shing will be available on Linux.". They're saying it's so good, they've called it a "beat-em-up 2.0". With Shing! Mass Creation say they're mixing in classic arcade-style gameplay with modern graphics and an innovative control scheme. This is not going to be a button basher, instead you use the right stick of a gamepad to directly control your weapon. It sounds good on paper but does it look good? Sure does! Take a look at their recent gameplay reveal:

today's leftovers

  • Talking About Communities and ‘People Powered’ with Leo Laporte

    I have always had a bit of a soft spot for the TWiT team and more specifically Leo Laporte. Years ago I used to co-host FLOSS Weekly on their network and occasionally I pop over to the studio for a natter with Leo. With ‘People Powered: How communities can supercharge your business, brand, and teams‘ coming out, I thought it would be fun to hop over there. Leo graciously agreed and we recorded an episode of their show, Triangulation.

  • Linux Action News 123

    Speed is the big story around GNOME 3.34, two new major Firefox security features start to roll out, and we explain the CentOS 8 delay. Plus our thoughts on the PineTime, and more.

  • KaOS 19.09 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at KaOS 19.09.

  • Congress Is Investigating Apple's Repair Monopoly

    For years, the independent repair community has said that Apple has engaged in anticompetitive behavior by refusing to sell parts to repair shops who are not “authorized” by the company. The company has also lobbied heavily against so called right-to-repair legislation, which would require it and other electronics companies to sell parts and tools to the general public. It has sued independent repair companies for using aftermarket and refurbished parts and worked with the Department of Homeland Security to seize unauthorized repair parts from small businesses both at customs and from individual shops. And, as the committee's letter notes, Apple cut a deal with Amazon that restricted who is allowed to sell refurbished Apple devices on Amazon.

    Apple has made small strides toward opening up the repair ecosystem. Earlier this month, the company said it would begin to sell repair parts to certain independent repair shops, though it has not said how much they will cost or what parts will be available.

    The internal communications are due to the committee on October 14.

Qt Quick on Vulkan, Metal, and Direct3D

Now that the first beta of Qt 5.14 is getting closer, it is time to start talking about one of the big new features. We cannot possibly cover all the details around the graphics stack improvements and the road to Qt 6 in one post, so in part 1 and 2 we will describe the background and take a closer look at what 5.14 will ship with, and then dive into the technical details and future directions in another set of posts later on. Read more Also: Linux Drivers Entries Suggest two APU AMD Lines in 2020