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LibO

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.4.2, Gets LibreOffice 5.1

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LibO
Ubuntu

The first Beta release of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system will launch in a few hours for the opt-in flavors, so the Ubuntu developers have pushed a great number of new packages into the repositories.

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Latest Manjaro Linux 15.12 Update Pack Adds Linux Kernel 4.4.2, LibreOffice 5.1

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Linux

Earlier today, February 21, 2016, Philip Müller and the Manjaro Development Team were proud to announce the general availability of the ninth update of Manjaro Linux 15.12 (Capella).

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Pondering the future of the Document Foundation

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LibO

This past week we had had the pleasure to welcome both our new marketing assistant and the new board of directors of the Document Foundation. I would like to say a few words on where the Document Foundation stands now – and I must stress that I’m confident the new board has the right people to handle the future of the foundation.

The Document Foundation is still a small entity compared to the Mozilla or OpenStack Foundation. However, with several hundreds of thousands of euros/dollars of resources, it just happens to stand just behind these behemoths. It is not an easy task. Commonly held opinions often do not apply with us: “pay X to code feature Y”. That is somewhat possible, but we tend not to do it, unless there is a strategic reason (and enough money) to do it. We do fund, however, our entire infrastructure, the release management process, infrastructure and tools that help the community develop, improve and release LibreOffice. As the Document Foundation is now four years old, we are adjusting our internal processes and decision making structure in order to scale up and be more effective. There is no easy answer, because most of the ones that could be made were already found during the past four years.

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LibreOffice News

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LibO
  • gtk3 and LibreOffice

    Couple of changes to the gtk3 support in LibreOffice master recently.

  • TDF@4

    The Document Foundation was officially registered in Berlin on February 17, 2012. Four years have gone by, and the project has grown to a size that nobody would have dared to dream at that time. Happy Birthday !

  • LibreOffice 5.1- an unusual release

    The Document Foundation just released LibreOffice 5.1 and I would like to share some personal views about it. First: give it a try, you will be impressed both by the performance and the changes in the user interface. You can then check the abridged release notes here and the full, canonical notes there.

LibreOffice Curator The Document Foundation Turns 4, Happy Birthday!

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LibO

Today, February 17, 2016, The Documentation Foundation, curator of the free, open-source, and cross-platform LibreOffice office suite beloved by GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows users alike, celebrates four years of activity.

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LibreOffice 5.0 Gets Its Fifth Point Release, Ready for Large-Scale Deployment

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LibO

After having the pleasure to inform the world about the release of the massive LibreOffice 5.1 office suite last week, The Document Foundation non-profit organization today, February 15, 2016, announced the general availability of LibreOffice 5.0.5.

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LibreOffice 5.1 Officially Released with Redesigned User Interface, New Features

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LibO

Today, February 10, The Document Foundation non-profit organization has proudly announced the release and immediate availability for download of the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite for all supported platforms.

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Also:

LibreOffice 5.1: The premier open-source office suite just keeps getting better

LibreOffice 5.1 Officially Released As The Best Open-Source Office Suite

LibreOffice 5.1.0 Just Around the Corner, Final RC Is Out

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LibO

The first major LibreOffice update for the 5.x branch is around the corner, and it should land very soon, especially now that the third RC for LibreOffice 5.1 is available for download and testing.

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LibreOffice Picks

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LibO
  • Update on Libreoffice and GNOME integration

    It’s been a long time I have talked about the project that I started with GSoC 2015 some time back. We reached at pretty much exciting results by the end of the summer where we could see the integration working pretty well with LibreOffice. We finished and merged all the major work on the Libreoffice side alongwith just-made-it-work integration with gnome-documents. Things were still in the development stage for gnome-documents, and we needed good amount of effort to get it merged upstream.

  • Why I love hacking at LibreOffice

    The LibreOffice codebase is, to be frank, messy. This isn't a criticism of previous developers - it's still an amazing product and an amazing feat of programming given the number of platforms it runs on. The StarView guys, and later OpenOffice.org development team, did a great job. For instance, I was reading up on the font mapping code and I often saw Herbert Duerr's name, and I've got nothing but respect for the work that he did and his dedication to the project.

  • Way Down In The Libreoffice Menus

    With the release of LibreOffice 4.4 last year, we began making incremental updates to the main menus, with the major overhaul happening in the upcoming 5.1 release. The work is guided by LibreOffice’s new Human Interface Guideline (HIG), which has given us the core framework, however some questions have arisen challenging the reasoning of our work. So this post is a summary of what we changed, primarily focused on why we’ve done it – and a little outlook of what is planned for the future.

LibreOffice 5.1.0 to Integrate OpenGL and Coverity Fixes

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The Document Foundation has revealed the second Release Candidate for LibreOffice 5.1.0, the first major update for the 5.x branch of the famous office suite.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Microsoft Sued After Windows 10 Upgrade “Destroyed Users’ Computers”
    In the lawsuit documents (via The Reg), the plaintiffs explain that Microsoft did not “exercise reasonable care in designing, formulating, and manufacturing the Windows 10 upgrade,” becoming responsible for damages caused to users in the form of data loss and hardware issues.
  • WebTorrent Desktop: Instant Video Streaming App for Linux Desktop
    WebTorrent Desktop is a cross-platform open source torrent client with which you can instantly stream audio and video torrent files without waiting to completely download them. It features a beautiful and modern User Interface, streaming support for videos from Internet Archive, music from Creative Commons, and audiobooks from Librivox, and has the ability to talk to BitTorrent and WebTorrent peers while providing a seamless User Experience.
  • Humble Store has some noteworthy deals on this weekend
  • clr-boot-manager now available in Solus
    We’re happy to announce the rollout of clr-boot-manager in our stable repository. clr-boot-manager, from the Clear Linux Project For Intel Architecture, enables a more bulletproof update experience by handling the maintenance and garbage collection of kernels, as well as configuration of the bootloader itself (i.e. GRUB2 for Legacy Boot, goofiboot for UEFI boot on Solus). Furthermore, it enables us to retain older, known-working kernels, so in the event a kernel upgrade results in the inability to boot, you’ll still be able to roll back to the last good kernel.
  • Ubuntu vs Arch Linux
    Comparing Ubuntu to Arch Linux. Focus is entirely on the underlying system, as Arch don’t offer a specific interface to compare with Ubuntu’s Unity desktop.
  • Packaging Ishiiruka-Dolphin (GameCube/Wii Emulator)
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) To Kick Off Another Week Of Big Earnings Reports
  • Debian Project Leader elections 2017
    It's that time of year again for the Debian Project: the elections of its Project Leader! The Project Leader position is described in the Debian Constitution.

today's howtos

Canonical and Ubuntu

  • RADV & ANV Vulkan Drivers Are One Command Away On Ubuntu 17.04
    Similar to Ubuntu 16.10, the Mesa Vulkan drivers are not present by default on new Ubuntu installations. But to get the packaged Vulkan drivers, simply sudo apt install mesa-vulkan-drivers. When running some tests on Ubuntu 17.04 this weekend, I was a bit surprised to see that Mesa's Intel ANV and Radeon RADV drivers aren't present by default -- since it's been one year since the Vulkan 1.0 debut and the ANV/RADV drivers have matured a lot during this time. There's also more and more software becoming available that can make use of Vulkan while personally wishing for more Linux desktops to push Vulkan. But it's easy to install the Vulkan drivers as mentioned. Similarly, vulkan-utils isn't installed by default.
  • Wishful Thinking Of Non-Free Software Makers
    Regardless of my personal problems with non-Free software, the world has largely accepted FLOSS to SAS’s chagrin. I guess Canonical should be glad except they barely mention “Linux” on their site. What’s with that? They are like some purveyors of non-Free software that talk about the benefits of their products without even mentioning what the software actually does as if that’s best kept secret…
  • 2017: Should Linux Benchmarking Still Be Mostly Done With Ubuntu?
    Every year or so it comes up how some users believe that at Phoronix we should be benchmarking with Antergos/Arch, Debian, or [insert here any other distribution] instead of mostly using Ubuntu for our Linux benchmarking. That discussion has come back up in recent days. In our forums and Twitter the past few days, that discussion seems to have come up by some users requesting I use a different Linux distribution than Ubuntu as the main test platform for all of our benchmarking. As I've said before, Ubuntu is used given it's the most popular when it comes to Linux desktop usage as well as significant usage of it on servers / workstations / cloud. But I have no tie to it beyond focusing upon using the Linux distribution that's used by the most folks for obtaining the maximum relevance to users, gamers, and enthusiasts reading said articles. And for allowing easy comparisons / out-of-the-box expectations. On my main production system I still use Fedora Workstation as my personal favorite and in the basement server room there are a variety of operating systems -- both BSDs and Linux and from Antergos to openSUSE and Debian.

Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android