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LibreOffice Liberation

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  • Sun, sea, and open source: How Spain's Balearic islands are trying to turn into a tech paradise

    However, work remains to be done, especially on civil servants' desktops. "We started by replacing MSN Office", explains Villoslada. "Thanks to free office suite LibreOffice 5, we may overcome compatibility problems with documents coming in from different versions of MSN Office. We already have 1,000 Office licenses which are not necessary anymore, and we plan not to renew over 5,500 licenses purchased in 2007", he adds.

  • The Document Liberation Project: What we do

    While The Document Foundation is best known for LibreOffice, it also backs the Document Liberation Project. But what exactly is that? We’ve made a short video to explain all…

The Italian Army Switches to LibreOffice

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Following announcements made last year, the Italian army has moved forward with its plan to replace Microsoft Office with LibreOffice. So far, the army has tested its transition plan across 5000 workstations without significant problems. Following its LibreDifesa plan, the army aims to replace all MS Office installations by the end of the year.

In doing so, the Italian army will join government departments from Spain, France, the UK, Holland and Germany in setting an example for the rest of the public sector to follow.

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Upcoming Features of LibreOffice 5.2

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The Document Foundation is currently planning on the release of the next major version of the LibreOffice open-source and cross-platform office suite, LibreOffice 5.2.

And, in the good tradition of our "Upcoming features of" series of articles, and because more new features have been unveiled already for the upcoming LibreOffice 5.2 release, we thought that it will be a good idea to keep you guys in the loop and let you know what is to be expected from the LibreOffice 5.2 office suite.

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Also: Italian Military Goes LibreOffice, HBO Abuses DMCA & More…

Office Suites for GNU/Linux

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  • What Is the Best Word Processor for Linux?

    Even after all these years, no one has yet dethroned Microsoft Word from its kingly position. Sure, a few alternatives have been playing a great game of catch-up and innovation, but there’s no doubt about it — Word is still the best.

    But unless you use some kind of emulation or virtualization software, there’s no way to run Word on a regular Linux setup. Which leaves us with a tough question: what’s the best word processor to use on Linux?

    There are a handful of worthy options out there. Let’s take a brief but thorough look at them to see all of their pros and cons. By the end, it’ll be up to you to pick the one that works best for your needs.

  • LibreOffice 5.1.3 Stable Now Available on Windows, Linux, and Mac

    LibreOffice has become the top alternative to Microsoft Office on Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X, so whenever a new version comes out, users rush to download it and benefit from the latest improvements made to built-in apps.

  • LibreOffice 5.1.3 available for download

    The Document Foundation (TDF) announces LibreOffice 5.1.3, the third minor release of the LibreOffice 5.1 family, supporting Google Drive remote connectivity on GNU/Linux and MacOS X.

Italian military to save 26-29 million Euro by migrating to LibreOffice

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The Italian Ministry of Defence expects to save 26-29 million Euro over the coming years by using LibreOffice. The LibreDifesa project aims to eventually migrate all of the organisation's well over 100,000 desktops to the open-source office productivity suite. "Taking into account the deadlines set by our current Microsoft Office licences, we will have 75,000 (70%) LibreOffice users by 2017, and an additional 25,000 by 2020," says General Camillo Sileo, Deputy Chief of Department VI, Systems Department C4I, for the Transformation of Defence and General Staff. That will make this deployment of LibreOffice the largest in Europe.

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Also: Another Big Rollout of LibreOffice Saves Money

LibreOffice News

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Not so fast, open standards!

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OSS

There are however some hiccups with vendor lock-in, in cloud computing or elsewhere. It just hasn’t disappeared. The lock-in still exists through proprietary or otherwise unimplementable file formats; through undocumented protocols and weak or non existent reversibility clauses. Vendor lock-in has not gone away, it has become more subtle by moving up the ladder. If your entire business processes are hosted and run by a cloud service provider there may be some good reasons for you to have made that choice; but the day the need for another provider or another platform is felt the real test will be to know if it is possible to back up your data and processes and rebuild them elsewhere and in a different way. That’s an area where open standards could really help and will play an increasing role. Another area where open standards are still contentious is multimedia: remember what happened to Mozilla in 2015 when they chose to embed proprietary, DRM-riddled codecs because of industry pressure.

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LibreOffice 5.0.6 Open-Source Office Suite Is Now Available for Download

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We were informed just a few minutes ago by The Document Foundation's Italo Vignoli about the immediate availability for download of the LibreOffice 5.0.6 "Still" open-source office suite.

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LibreOffice and Open365

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OSS
  • Open365 Is An Open Source Alternative to Microsoft Office 365

    One of Microsoft’s Office 365 program chief advantages over open source alternatives is the ability to sync documents via the cloud so you can edit them everywhere. Open365 has stepped up to finally match this feature set.

    Open365 works a lot like Office 365 does. The suite builds on LibreOffice Online to let you open your documents in the browser, or use any of the client apps for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android to open them. Open365 also gives you 20GB of cloud-based storage to store your files on that will be synced across your devices.

  • Open365: open source Office 365 alternative

    Open365 is an open source Office 365 alternative that allows you to edit or create documents online, and to sync files with the cloud.

    The service is in beta currently but you can sign up for it already on the official website. You may use it using a web browser, download clients for Windows, Mac or Linux desktop machines, or for Android. An iOS client is in the making currently and will be made available as well soon.

    Open 365 offers two main features that you can make use of. First, it enables you to synchronize files between devices you use and the cloud.

  • The importance of the Document Liberation Project

    Today I would like to focus on a quite interesting project, even though it is rarely spoken of: The Document Liberation Project. The Document Liberation Project is LibreOffice’s sister project and is hosted inside the Document Foundation; it keeps its own distinct goals and ecosystem however. We often think of it as being overly technical to explain, as the project does not provide binaries everyone may download and install on a computer. Let’s describe in a few words what it does.

  • Tested the Libre Office software.

Open Standards, Move Over

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OSS
OOo

Back in 2003, over 800 blog posts ago, I decided to launch something I called the Standards Blog. Not surprisingly, it focused mostly on the development, implementation and importance of open standards. But I also wrote about other areas of open collaboration, such as open data, open research, and of course, open source software. Over time, there were more and more stories about open source worth writing, as well as pieces on the sometimes tricky intersection of open standards and open source.

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Security: Windows 10 Bypass, Slackware OpenJDK Update and More

  • [Older] GHOSTHOOK ATTACK BYPASSES WINDOWS 10 PATCHGUARD
    A bypass of PatchGuard kernel protection in Windows 10 has been developed that brings rootkits for the latest version of the OS within reach of attackers. Since the introduction of PatchGuard and DeviceGuard, very few 64-bit Windows rootkits have been observed; Windows 10’s security, in particular its mitigations against memory-based attacks, are well regarded. Researchers at CyberArk, however, found a way around PatchGuard through a relatively new feature in Intel processors called Processor Trace (Intel PT).
  • [Slackware] OpenJDK 8 security round-up for July ’17
    Sooner than I anticipated, there is an update for OpenJDK 8. Andrew Hughes (aka GNU/Andrew) announced the release of IcedTea 3.5.0. The new icedtea framework compiles OpenJDK 8 Update 141 Build 15 (8u141_b15). This release includes the official July 2017 security fixes.
  • ROI (Not Security) the Most Immediate IoT Challenge
    According to Defining IoT Business Models, a new report from Canonical, the software company behind the Ubuntu Linux distribution, device security and privacy (45 percent) falls behind quantifying the return of investment (ROI) of their IoT projects (53 percent) as an immediate challenge. Canonical drew its conclusions from a survey of 361 IoT professionals conducted by IoTNow on behalf of the company.
  • Apply the STIG to even more operating systems with ansible-hardening
    Tons of improvements made their way into the ansible-hardening role in preparation for the OpenStack Pike release next month. The role has a new name, new documentation and extra tests. The role uses the Security Technical Implementation Guide (STIG) produced by the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) and applies the guidelines to Linux hosts using Ansible. Every control is configurable via simple Ansible variables and each control is thoroughly documented.
  • Open Source Flaw 'Devil's Ivy' Puts Millions of IoT Devices at Risk
    Millions of IoT devices are vulnerable to cybersecurity attacks due to a vulnerability initially discovered in remote security cameras, Senrio reported this week.
  • Microsoft’s secret weapon in ongoing struggle against Fancy Bear? Trademark law [Ed: Microsoft should make a start by stopping the addition of back doors to all its software]
  • SECURITY FOR THE SECURITY GODS! SANDBOXING FOR THE SANDBOXING THRONE
    Last year, probably as a distraction from doing anything else, or maybe because I was asked, I started reviewing bugs filed as a result of automated flaw discovery tools (from Coverity to UBSan via fuzzers) being run on gdk-pixbuf. Apart from the security implications of a good number of those problems, there was also the annoyance of having a busted image file bring down your file manager, your desktop, or even an app that opened a file chooser either because it was broken, or because the image loader for that format didn't check for the sanity of memory allocations.

5 open source tools for developing IoT applications

The internet of things is growing at a staggeringly fast pace, and is quickly coming to revolutionize virtually every aspect of modern life. Aspiring developers hoping to hop on board and profit off the growing phenomenon are constantly looking for the right tools to use. So what are the open source tools best suited for working with the IoT, and where can developers find them? A plethora of open source tools lay at the disposal of any would-be developer eager and wise enough to use them. By utilizing these five, you’ll find yourself tackling challenges and developing successful applications in no time. Read more Related: