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Marketing in Vendor Neutral FLOSS Projects #4

Filed under
LibO
OSS

The commercial ecosystem around LibreOffice is an un-necessarily tough environment to operate in. Companies contribute a large proportion of the work, and yet get very little acknowledgement – which in turn makes it hard for them to invest. This also creates an un-necessary tension with companies marketing – which has to focus on building their own brands. Companies should not fear the arrival of the LibreOffice brand to squash, claim credit for, and present their work as created by someone else – thus effectively depriving them of leads. This is unsustainable.

The LibreOffice project should give a new focus to promoting and celebrating all participants in its community – including ecosystem companies. This is far from a problem unique to companies. It is routinely the case that individual community members feel under-appreciated – they would like more recognition of their work, and promotion of their own personal public brands as valued contributors. This is something that TDF should re-balance its marketing resource into, in preference to product marketing.

The LibreOffice project should explicitly create space for enterprise distributions by explicitly pointing out the weaknesses of LibreOffice for enterprises on its hot marketing properties. This would have a positive effect of encouraging companies to acknowledge and build the LibreOffice brand safe in the knowledge that anyone visiting LibreOffice will get an accurate and balanced picture of their skills and contribution.

We badly need to increase diverse investment into our ecosystem by building an environment where deep investment into LibreOffice is a sound economic choice: economics ultimately drives ecosystem behavior. By creating the right environment – often not by acting, but by clearly and deliberately not acting in a space – we can build a virtuous circle of investment that produces ever better software that meets TDF’s mission.

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Michael Meeks: Marketing in Vendor Neutral FLOSS Projects #3

Filed under
LibO
OSS

One of the particular pathologies of the FLOSS world is that where marketing and investment get out of step. This was particularly obvious around the Linux Desktop and contributed to the tragic commercial failure not only of individual desktop Linux distributions (remember Mandriva?), but also to the significant pruning of both SUSE, and ultimately RedHat’s desktop investment – before finally claiming much of Canonical’s desktop investment too.

Setting a price expectation in a market of zero (or below), forever and for everyone – is ultimately toxic to building a thriving commercial ecosystem. Therefore, ensuring that marketing and engineering investment are well aligned is in this area is something that TDF must be focused on. Those subsidizing marketing and a zero-price-point by getting others to do the engineering for them - tend to talk about their virtuous investment in growing the pie / market size for all; however driving an unhelpful price expectation for enterprises in an un-sustainable way is ultimately self-defeating.

It is vitally important that returns are correlated with investments – ie. if one company invests heavily, that its return is reasonably correlated with its investment vs. non-investors, otherwise – the tragedy of the commons yields a set of passive parties eagerly waiting for the returns generated by others’ engineering investment.

In individual projects this should be addressed through various qualitative and quantitative investment metrics, clearly presenting the realities of what has been contributed, while retaining a neutrality to vendors and investors, and advertising our model to new entrants.

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LibreOffice: Marketing in Vendor Neutral FLOSS Projects and LibreOffice Conference 2018

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LibO
  • Marketing in Vendor Neutral FLOSS Projects #2

    In order to understand how we can best shape the ecosystem to drive LibreOffice’s success – it is helpful to understand first what products and services companies currently sell, and then consider how we want to shape the environment that they adapt to to encourage behaviors that we want.

  • Video playlist: Main room of LibreOffice Conference 2018

    We’ve finished editing and uploading all the videos from the main room of the LibreOffice Conference 2018 in Tirana, Albania.

LibreOffice 6.2 RC1 ready for testing

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LibO

The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce LibreOffice 6.2 RC1 is ready for testing!

LibreOffice 6.2 will be released as final at the beginning of February, 2019, being LibreOffice 6.2 RC1 the third pre-release since the development of version 6.2 started in mid May, 2018. See the release plan. Check the release notes to find the new features included in this version of LibreOffice.

LibreOffice 6.2 RC1 can be downloaded from here, and it’s available for Linux, MacOS and Windows.

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LibreOffice 6.1.4 Office Suite Released with More Than 125 Bug Fixes, Update Now

Filed under
LibO
Security

LibreOffice 6.1.4 comes one and a half months after version 6.1.3 with yet another layer of bug fixes across all the components of the office suite, including Writer, Calc, Draw, Impress, Base, and Math. However, it remains the choice of bleeding-edge users and early adopters until the LibreOffice 6.1 series matures enough to be offered to enterprises. A total of 126 changes are included, as detailed here and here.

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LibreOffice at FOSDEM and Special Characters' Final Touch

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LibO
  • Open Document Editors DevRoom at FOSDEM 2019: Call for Papers

    FOSDEM is one of the largest gatherings of Free Software contributors in the world and takes place each year in Brussels (Belgium) at the ULB Campus Solbosch. In 2019, it will be held on Saturday February 2, and Sunday February 3.

    The Open Document Editors DevRoom is scheduled for Saturday, February 2 (from 10:30AM to 7:00PM, room UB2.147).

    We are inviting proposals for talks about Open Document Editors or the ODF standard document format, on topics such as code, localization, QA, UX, tools, extensions and adoption-related cases. Please keep in mind that product pitches are not allowed at FOSDEM.

  • Special Characters: The Final Touch

    Last year we revised the workflow to insert special characters. Based on a design proposal the dialog was reimplemented in a Google Summer of Code project by Akshay Deep. The new dialog allows to easily browse through the list and to search for glyphs contained in the selected font. It also introduced Favorites (a user collection of glyphs that are used frequently) and a list of Recently Used glyphs. But some pieces got more or less intentionally lost and some parts of the redesign might have room for improvements. So here is an idea for the final touch.

Community Member Monday: Iwan Tahari on LibreOffice migrations in Indonesia

Filed under
GNU
LibO
Linux

Many companies around the world use free and open source software (FOSS) to reduce costs, improve reliability, and free themselves from vendor lock-in. Today we talk to Iwan Tahari from FANS, an Indonesian shoe manufacturer, which has migrated to GNU/Linux and LibreOffice...

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Report: LibreOffice Bug Hunting Session in Taiwan

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LibO

LibreOffice’s worldwide community is active in many parts of the project – in development, localisation, documentation, design, marketing and more. There’s also the Quality Assurance (QA) community, which focuses on identifying and fixing bugs. At a recent event in Taiwan, a Bug Hunting Session took place to check bug reports, as Franklin Weng explains…

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Software: LibreOffice, LibrePCB and Darktable

Filed under
LibO
Software
  • Month of LibreOffice, November 2018: The winners!

    This is the best Month of LibreOffice we’ve ever had, reflecting our lively and growing community.

  • LibrePCB 0.1.0 Released

    Since the release candidate 0.1.0 RC2 three weeks ago, no critical bugs were reported, so we decided to finally publish the stable release 0.1.0.

  • LibrePCB 0.1.0 released with major changes in library editor and file format

    Last week, the team at LibrePCB released LibrePCB 0.1.0., a free EDA (Electronic Design Automation) software used for developing printed circuit boards. Just three weeks ago, LibrePCB 0.1.0 RC2 was released with major changes in library manager, control panel, library editor, schematic editor and more.

    The key features of LibrePCB include, cross-platform (Unix/ Linux, Mac OS X, Windows), all-in-one (project management, library/schematic/board editors) and intuitive, modern and easy-to-use graphical user interface. It also features powerful library designs and human-readable file formats.

  • Darktable 2.6 Release Cycle Kicks Off With New Modules, PPC64LE Support

    Developers are beginning to firm up the Darktable 2.6 release as the next feature update to this amazing, cross-platform open-source RAW photography software.

    This open-source photography workflow software continues getting better and with Darktable 2.6 there are more features coming as outlined by yesterday's 2.6-RC0 tag.

LibreOffice and Sparky Donations Toll/Requests

Filed under
GNU
LibO
Linux
  • LibreOffice Fundraising, December 1st

    Consider a donation to support activities such as the LibreItalia Conference and other events organized by native language communities https://www.libreoffice.org/donate

  • November 2018 donation report

    Many thanks to all of you for supporting Sparky!
    Your donations help keeping Sparky alive.

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