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LibO

LibreOffice: LibreOffice 6.2.8, FOSDEM 2020 and LibreOffice Conference 2019

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LibO
  • LibreOffice 6.2.8 is available, the last release of the 6.2 family

    The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.2.8, the last minor release of the LibreOffice 6.2 family. All users of LibreOffice 6.2.x versions should update immediately for enhanced security, and be prepared to upgrade to LibreOffice 6.3.4 as soon as it becomes available in December.

    For enterprise class deployments, TDF strongly recommends sourcing LibreOffice from one of the ecosystem partners to get long-term supported releases, dedicated assistance, custom new features and bug fixes, and other benefits. Also, the work done by ecosystem partners flows back into the LibreOffice project, benefiting everyone.

    LibreOffice’s individual users are helped by a global community of volunteers: https://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/community-support/. On the website and the wiki there are guides, manuals, tutorials and HowTos. Donations help us to make all of these resources available.

    LibreOffice users are invited to join the community at https://ask.libreoffice.org, where they can get and provide user-to-user support. While TDF can not provide commercial level support, there are guides, manuals, tutorials and HowTos on the website and the wiki. Your donations help us make these available.

  • LibreOffice 6.2.8 Arrives as the Last in the Series, Prepare for LibreOffice 6.3

    The Document Foundation released today the eight and final maintenance update for the LibreOffice 6.2 open-source and cross-platform office suite series.

    LibreOffice 6.2.8 is here one and a half months after the release of LibreOffice 6.2.7, which was announced in early September alongside the first point release of the latest LibreOffice 6.3 series. This maintenance release brings a total of 26 bug fixes and improvements across various components, as detailed here and here.

    While the LibreOffice 6.2 office suite series is still recommended for enterprise deployments, unfortunately it will reach end of life next month on November 30th. As such, the Document Foundation recommends all enterprise users to update to LibreOffice 6.2.8 immediately for enhanced security, and start preparing to upgrade to LibreOffice 6.3.

  • FOSDEM 2020: Open Document Editors DevRoom Call for Papers

    FOSDEM is one of the largest gatherings of Free Software contributors in the world and happens each year in Brussels (Belgium) at the ULB Campus Solbosch. In 2020, it will be held on Saturday, February 1, and Sunday, February 2.

    The Open Document Editors (OFE) DevRoom is scheduled for Saturday, February 1, from 10:30AM to 7PM. Physical room has not yet been assigned by FOSDEM. The shared devroom gives all project in this area a chance to present ODF related developments and innovations.

    We are now inviting proposals for talks about Open Document Editors or the ODF document format, on topics such as code, extensions, localization, QA, UX, tools and adoption related cases. This is a unique opportunity to show new ideas and developments to a wide technical audience.

  • Eight videos from the auditorium at LibreOffice Conference 2019

    In September we had the LibreOffice Conference 2019 in Almeria, Spain. We’re uploading videos from the presentations that took place, so here’s a new batch! First up is “Janitor of Sanity” with Stephan Bergmann...

Coming up on October 21: First Bug Hunting Session for LibreOffice 6.4!

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Development
LibO

LibreOffice 6.4 is being developed by our worldwide community, and is due to be released in early February 2020 – see the release notes describing the new features here. Of course, we’re still early in the development cycle, so many more features are still to come!

In order to find, report and triage bugs, the LibreOffice QA team is organizing the first Bug Hunting Session for LibreOffice 6.4 on Monday October 21, 2019. Tests will be performed on the first Alpha version, which will be available on the pre-releases server a few days before the event. Builds will be available for Linux (DEB and RPM), macOS and Windows, and can be installed and run in parallel along with the production version.

Mentors will be available from 07:00 UTC to 19:00 UTC for questions or help in the IRC channel #libreoffice-qa and the Telegram QA Channel. Of course, hunting bugs will be possible also on other days, as the builds of this particular Alpha release (LibreOffice 6.4.0 Alpha 1) will be available until mid November. Check the Release Plan.

Read more

Also: Microsoft Office for free? Try these great alternatives

Document Foundation: ‘ODF 1.3 ready for ratification by OASIS’

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LibO
OOo

Version 1.3 of the Open Document Format (ODF), an open standard for documents, spreadsheets and presentations, will be ratified by the OASIS standardisation organisation in December, according to the Document Foundation – the organisation supporting the development of LibreOffice. This update of the ODF standard has been made possible by financial contributions from the United Kingdom, the European Commission, and three office productivity software companies: US multinational Microsoft, UK-based Collabora, and German software maker CIB.

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LibreOffice 6.3.2 for Slackware and Starting The Document Collective

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LibO
  • LibreOffice 6.3.2 for Slackware-current – and how to deal with “Shared library .so-version bump”

    Let me first elaborate a bit on the strategies that are available to a Slackware user on how to deal with incompatible library updates in -current.

    One of the reasons people are wary of installing and running Slackware-current is the fact that at any given moment, distro updates can break 3rd-party packages (i.e. packages you have installed that are not part of the Slackware distribution itself). Slackware-current is in constant flux, it is our development environment, and software versions can make sudden jumps with unexpected consequences.

    Big tip: before running any update on a slackware-current system, first check the ChangeLog.txt and scan the updates since your previous upgrade for the text “Shared library .so-version bump.” which is another way of saying “incompatible ABI change”.
    If this text accompanies a package update you can be pretty certain that some 3rd-party packages that depend on it will stop working. And if that particular package is boost, icu4c or poppler, expect massive breakage. The safest approach in a case like this, is: wait with upgrading your Slackware-current; check for packages that have a dependency on the package with the ABI breakage: and track the 3rd-party repositories for updates that address the ABI breakage.

    There is another strategy- one which allows you to upgrade to the latest -current while avoiding broken packages. That is to keep the older libraries on your system – the libraries your 3rd-party packages are depending on. You can simply extract these older libraries from the previous version(s) of the upgraded Slackware package. Darren Austen and I worked together to create a package repository containing historical Slackware-current packages (32bit, 64bit official packages and my own multilib archive). See https://slackware.uk/cumulative/ if you are in need of older package versions.

  • Starting The Document Collective

    The Document Foundation (TDF) is the home of the LibreOffice free-software office suite; it provides financial, governance, and other administrative services to LibreOffice. The foundation was established in part to ensure that commercial entities did not have undue influence on the project, which limited the types of activities in which it can engage. In particular, selling branded versions of LibreOffice in the macOS and Windows app stores has not been something that TDF could tackle. The TDF board of directors is looking to change that with the creation of a new entity, The Document Collective (TDC), to engage in commercial activity that is complementary to that of TDF members—hopefully as an income source to help support TDF.

    The TDC proposal [PDF] was adopted by the TDF board on September 9 and unveiled at the LibreOffice conference (slides [PDF]) and in a post to the board-discuss mailing list on September 11. The board has decided to start the creation of TDC by appointing a transitional leadership group. The TDC leadership has been directed to set up an unincorporated association as part of Public Software CIC, which is a European umbrella organization (a "community interest company" or CIC) that provides administrative services to free and open-source software projects. That is meant to be a temporary measure until a full legal entity can be set up. TDC will also have €50,000 in funds available to draw on from TDF; the money is a loan that is meant to be repaid with interest from the proceeds of selling LibreOffice in the app stores. There may be other moneymaking activities that TDC ends up undertaking as well.

    TDC is tasked with getting LibreOffice into the app stores for macOS and Windows. To that end, Public Software CIC will be granted a trademark license for the LibreOffice mark that can be used for app store packages. Initially there will be no separate TDC entity, but that will eventually be set up in some European jurisdiction and all of the TDC work that has been done will be transferred to the new entity. Effectively, the agreement with Public Software CIC will just allow TDC to start working immediately while it initializes its governance and legal entity in parallel.

    There were a few comments on the announcement. Uwe Altmann wondered about the business plan for TDC; given that there is already some experience from two companies selling LibreOffice in the app stores, it would seem reasonable to put together an initial budget, for example. In addition, starting out by setting up an association with Public Software CIC with a fairly large budget seemed unnecessary; there are other organizational structures that could be set up more easily and cheaply, he said.

Events: GUADEC, LibreOffice Conference, SUSE in TechEd and LibrePlanet

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GNU
LibO
GNOME
SUSE
  • GUADEC 2019 | Part 1: Passing the Baton

    This year, GUADEC was held in Thessaloniki, Greece from August 23rd – 28th. I had a great time at the conference and took some time to travel after, so I was able to see some of Northern Greece, in addition to hanging out with some of the best people I know while at GUADEC.

    Since there’s a lot of talk about, I’ll be doing two separate posts, one about the Board meeting (in this post), and one about the conference itself (next post).

  • LibreOffice monthly recap: September 2019

    Here’s our summary of updates, events and activities in the LibreOffice project in the last four weeks – click the links to learn more!

    The biggest event in September was the LibreOffice Conference 2019 which took place in Almeria, Spain. Over 100 people from across the globe met up to discuss current developments in LibreOffice, make plans for the future, and have fun. 

  • Hola Barcelona! – SUSE @ TechEd – All You Need to Know

    Hola! SUSE will be exhibiting at TechEd Barcelona 2019. As it was always a great event in the past I am already looking forward to be in Barcelona again. This year we have a great set of video based demos about new features and capabilities available on our booth. Lee Martin and Fabian Herschel (myself) will also present the features also during our lecture. Reserve the date! Our lecture will take place at Wednesday, October 8th from 9:15-10:15 am in room L11. Get a great overview of all you need to know in our session which has the number CAA139. All you need to know – find us in the SAP TechEd Barcelona session catalog.

  • FSF Blogs: Submit a session proposal for LibrePlanet 2020 conference: Free the Future by Nov. 20

    The Free Software Foundation (FSF) invites activists, hackers, law professionals, artists, students, developers, young people, policymakers, tinkerers, newcomers to free software, and anyone looking for technology that aligns with their ideals, to submit a proposal for a session at our twelfth annual social justice and technology LibrePlanet conference. Potential talks should examine free software through the lens of this year's theme, and can focus on software development, copyleft, community, or other related issues.

    Submissions to the call for sessions are being accepted through Wednesday, November 20, 2019 at 12:00pm Eastern Standard time (17:00 UTC).

    Over the last decade, LibrePlanet has blossomed from a small gathering of FSF members into a vibrant multi-day event that attracts a broad audience of anyone interested in the values of software freedom. LibrePlanet 2019 had almost a thousand people participate around the world, both online and in-person, for workshops and talks centered around the theme of "Trailblazing Free Software." To stay up to date about everything LibrePlanet 2020, visit https://www.libreplanet.org/2020.

LibreOffice 10/20 Logo Community Contest

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LibO

The year 2020 will be the 20th anniversary of the free office suite (OpenOffice.org was announced on July 19, 2000) and the 10th anniversary of LibreOffice (announced on September 28, 2010). We have the opportunity to celebrate both during the year, to reaffirm the fact that LibreOffice today is the leading free office suite available in the market.

For the anniversary project, we need a specific logo which celebrates the 10/20 anniversary without making a difference between the two dates, as the concept is that LibreOffice was born 20 years ago as OpenOffice.org, and evolved into LibreOffice 10 years ago.

The 10/20 logo should be easy to associate to the current LibreOffice logo (with tagline), and follow TDF design and style guides (Corporate Image) published on the wiki: https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Marketing/Branding.

The 10/20 logo will be used for presentations, event signage, swag and gadgets (like stickers). It should be easy to recognize and read at small sizes.

Read more

Also: Interview with Ilmari Lauhakangas, Development Marketing

Happy 9th Anniversary, LibreOffice

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LibO

Happy 9th Anniversary to LibreOffice, to the community of volunteer contributors – represented by The Document Foundation – and to every person who made the dream possible with a donation or a simple download. If you have developed, patched, localized, tested, triaged, documented, communicated, promoted, explained, supported, certified, trained or migrated either the software or the organizations deploying it or the people using it, you should celebrate. Together, we have been able to transform a dream into a reality.

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LibreOffice 6.3.2 Open-Source Office Suite Released with 49 Bug Fixes

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LibO
OSS
Security

Coming three weeks after the first point release, LibreOffice 6.3.2 is here to address a total of 49 bugs and regressions across various of its core components, including Writer, Draw, Math, Calc, and Impress. The goal is to make the LibreOffice 6.3 office suite series more stable and reliable until it is ready for enterprise deployments, which is supported until May 29, 2020.

"LibreOffice 6.3.2 “fresh” is targeted at technology enthusiasts and power users, who are suggested to update their current version," said Italo Vignoli. "For enterprise class deployments, TDF strongly recommend sourcing LibreOffice from one of the ecosystem partners to get long-term supported releases, dedicated assistance, custom new features and bug fixes, and other benefits."

Read more

The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.3.2

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LibO

The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.3.2, the second minor release of the LibreOffice 6.3 family, with many bug and regression fixes. LibreOffice 6.3.2 “fresh” is targeted at technology enthusiasts and power users, who are suggested to update their current version.

LibreOffice’s individual users are helped by a global community of volunteers: https://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/community-support/. On the website and the wiki there are guides, manuals, tutorials and HowTos. Donations help us to make all of these resources available.

Read more

Events: Kubernetes Contributor Summit and LibreOffice Conference 2019

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LibO
OSS
  • Kubernetes: Contributor Summit San Diego Registration Open!

    While the Kubernetes project is only five years old, we’re already going into our 9th Contributor Summit this November in San Diego before KubeCon + CloudNativeCon. The rapid increase is thanks to adding European and Asian Contributor Summits to the North American events we’ve done previously. We will continue to run Contributor Summits across the globe, as it is important that our contributor base grows in all forms of diversity.

    Kubernetes has a large distributed remote contributing team, from individuals and organizations all over the world. The Contributor Summits give the community three chances a year to get together, work on community topics, and have hallway track time. The upcoming San Diego summit is expected to bring over 450 attendees, and will contain multiple tracks with something for everyone. The focus will be around contributor growth and sustainability. We’re going to stop here with capacity for future summits; we want this event to offer value to individuals and the project. We’ve heard from past summit attendee feedback that getting work done, learning, and meeting folks face to face is a priority. By capping attendance and offering the contributor gatherings in more locations, it will help us achieve those goals.

    This summit is unique as we’ve taken big moves on sustaining ourselves, the contributor experience events team. Taking a page from the release team’s playbook, we have added additional core team and shadow roles making it a natural mentoring (watching+doing) relationship. The shadows are expected to fill another role at one of the three events in 2020, and core team members to take the lead. In preparation for this team, we’ve open sourced our rolebooks, guidelines, best practices and opened up our meetings and project board. Our team makes up many parts of the Kubernetes project and takes care of making sure all voices are represented.

  • LibreOffice Conference 2019 by numbers

    LibreOffice Conference 2019 ended and… seems people really enjoyed!

    Here I provide some metrics about the conference. Hopefully they’ll be useful for next years.

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