Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

LibO

10 reasons you should use LibreOffice and not Microsoft Word

Filed under
LibO
Microsoft
OSS

The Document Foundation just released version 5.2 of its fully open source office suite LibreOffice. This release brings many new features and UI improvements. When I got the press release, I started updating LibreOffice on my MacBook. But here's the thing: I'm also a user of Microsoft Word.

That made me pause and consider why I use LibreOffice when I am forking over $99 a year to Microsoft. The flash of introspection surprised me. I'm an unabashed open source and Linux fan, but I am kind of agnostic when it comes to the tools I use. I use what works for me. So I reached out to my followers on Google+ and Facebook to learn about their reasons for using LibreOffice.

Here are some of the many reasons why people, myself included, love LibreOffice.

Read more

More on LibreOffice 5.2

Filed under
LibO
  • LibreOffice 5.2 “fresh” released, for Windows, Mac OS and GNU/Linux

    The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 5.2, a feature-rich major release of the best free office suite ever created – targeted to early adopters and power users – with several user interface improvements and enterprise grade features.

    At the same time, LibreOffice 5.1.5 has been released, for enterprise class deployments and more conservative office suite users.

  • LibreOffice Versions 5.2 and 5.1.5 Released

    The Document Foundation today announced the releases of LibreOffice 5.2 and 5.1.5. LibreOffice 5.2 is the latest in the Fresh branch of the popular office suite bringing a new document classification system that will help keep prying eyes out. Other improvements include a single line toolbar option, quicker access to Print to File, and several other goodies. Of course, they're always tweaking the core code as well making for a faster and more stable experience. But wait, there's even more...

    As security concerns increase the Transglobal Secure Collaboration Program is a public-private partnership formed to secure electronic communication primarily for defense contractors and government entities. They've laid out specifications and frameworks that allow for more secure shared documents over the Internet. LibreOffice 5.2 adheres to these document classification specifications so it can be deployed in more sensitive projects.

  • LibreOffice 5.2 ‘Fresh’ Released, Download For Linux, Windows, and Mac

Additional LibreOffice 5.2.0 Coverage

Filed under
LibO
  • LibreOffice 5.2 Released, This Is What’s New
  • LibreOffice 5.2 Officially Released
  • LibreOffice 5.2 released

    LibreOffice 5.1.5 “still” announced, for enterprise class deployments

    Berlin, August 3, 2016 – The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 5.2, a feature-rich major release of the best free office suite ever created – targeted to early adopters and power users – with several user interface improvements and enterprise grade features.

    At the same time, LibreOffice 5.1.5 has been released, for enterprise class deployments and more conservative office suite users.

  • LibreOffice under the hood: a year of progress from 5.0 to 5.2

    Today we release LibreOffice 5.2.0, the next step in our journey, and what will become the base of the increasingly stable 5.2.x series. There is a fine suite of new features for people to enjoy - you can read and enjoy all the great news about the user visible features from many great hackers, but there are, as always, many contributors whose work is primarily behind the scenes, and a lot of work that is more technical than user-facing.

LibreOffice 5.2 Officially Released with Interface Refinements, New Features

Filed under
LibO

Today, August 3, 2016, The Document Foundation non-profit organization has had the great pleasure of announcing the general availability of the LibreOffice 5.2 open-source and cross-platform office suite software.

Read more

More on Canonical in the Document Foundation

Filed under
LibO
Ubuntu
  • Canonical Takes a Seat On The Document Foundation’s Advisory Board
  • The Document Foundation welcomes Canonical to the project Advisory Board
  • Canonical Joins The Document Foundation Advisory Board

    The Document Foundation today announced that Ubuntu parent company Canonical has joined The Document Foundation Advisory Board. The foundation said Canonical is to provide "experience and insights" to increase the use of LibreOffice in the enterprise and government. Canonical joins the likes of KDE, GNOME, Red Hat, SUSE, and Google on the board.

    The board's main purpose is to represent the foundation's sponsors and their needs to the Board of Directors, although the BoD isn't under obligation to accept or act on any proposals made by the advisory board. The BoD does, on occasion, solicit advice and guidance from the advisory board and the advisory board does make proposals on behalf of their members. Some of the other members on the Advisory Board include those listed above as well as the Free Software Foundation, Collabora, Intel, the French government, CloudOn, City of Munich government, and AMD.

Canonical Joins The Document Foundation's LibreOffice Project Advisory Board

Filed under
LibO
Ubuntu

Today, July 26, 2016, Canonical and The Document Foundation (TDF) announced that the company behind the popular Ubuntu operating system had joined the LibreOffice project Advisory Board.

If you're using the Ubuntu Linux OS on your personal computer, you are aware of the fact that the award-winning LibreOffice office suite is installed by default. Canonical chose to use LibreOffice as the default office suite for its widely-used GNU/Linux operating system since the first release of the open-source software in early 2011.

Now that Canonical announced the availability of Snaps as universal binary packages for Ubuntu and other supported GNU/Linux distributions, many application developers decided to offer their software in the Snap package format, and it looks like The Document Foundation is among the first to adopt the latest Snappy technologies for LibreOffice.

Read more

LibreOffice News

Filed under
LibO
  • LIBOCon: get around Brno

    Yesterday I added Get around Brno page to the LibreOffice Conference website. There you can find comprehensive information about public transport in Brno, how to buy tickets, how to get to the hotel/venue if you arrive by train/bus/car/plane etc. All accompanied with maps and pictures of described places. So hopefully no one will get lost on their way to the hotel or venue, or struggle purchasing tickets.

  • LibreOffice developer interview: Winfried Donkers

    In this week’s developer interview, we talk to Winfried Donkers, a Dutch coder who has been using LibreOffice (and its predecessors) for almost two decades, and today works on Calc.

LibreOffice News

Filed under
LibO

From Microsoft to LibreOffice: How Italy's military is starting its march to open source

Filed under
LibO
Microsoft

In the past few years a growing number of Italian public bodies have chosen to ditch proprietary software for open source.

But most of these decisions have been taken at the local level, while in general the country's central government has seemed more reluctant to follow the open-source path.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Berkeley launches RISELab, enabling computers to make intelligent real-time decisions
  • Amazon, Google, Huawei, and Microsoft sponsor UC Berkeley RISELab, AMPLab's successor
  • Brotli: A new compression algorithm for faster Internet
    Brotli is a new open source compression algorithm designed to enable an Internet that's faster for users. Modern web pages can often be made up of dozens of megabytes of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and that's before accounting for images, videos, or other large file content, which all makes for hefty downloads. Such loads are why pages are transferred in compressed formats; they significantly reduce the time required between a website visitor requesting a web page and that page appearing fully loaded on the screen and ready for use. While the Brotli algorithm was announced by Google in September 2015, only recently have the majority of web browsers have adopted it. The HTTP servers Apache and nginx now offer Brotli compression as an option. Besides Google, other commercial vendors (such as Cloudflare and DreamHost) have begun to deploy support for Brotli as well.
  • New Year’s resolution: Donate to 1 free software project every month
    Free and open source software is an absolutely critical part of our world—and the future of technology and computing. One problem that consistently plagues many free software projects, though, is the challenge of funding ongoing development (and support and documentation). With that in mind, I have finally settled on a New Year’s resolution for 2017: to donate to one free software project (or group) every month—or the whole year. After all, these projects are saving me a boatload of money because I don’t need to buy expensive, proprietary packages to accomplish the same things.
  • Toyota and Ford Promote Open Source Smartphone Interfaces
    Ford and Toyota have formed a four-automaker consortium to speed up the deployment of open source software for connected in-car systems, according to a report by Bloomberg. The SmartDeviceLink Consortium, which includes Mazda, PSA Group, Fuji, and Suzuki, aims to prevent Apple and Google from controlling how drivers connect smartphones to their vehicles. Suppliers Elektrobit, Harma, Luxoft, QNX, and Xevo have also joined the organization, which is named after an open source version of Ford’s AppLink connectivity interface, a system used in over 5 million vehicles globally.
  • What your code repository says about you
    "You only get one chance to make a first impression," the old saying goes. It's cliche, but nevertheless sound, practical advice. In the realm of open source, it can make the difference between a project that succeeds and a project that fails. That's why making a positive first impression when you release a repo to the world is essential—at least if your motivations involve gaining users, building a community of contributors, and attracting valuable feedback.
  • The Open Source Way of Reaching Across Languages
    I don’t speak Spanish, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn some important things from this video. The visuals alone are quite instructive. At my public library job, I mentor a number of wonderful Latino youth. One of them might ask me about open source CAD software — and I’ll direct them right to this FOSS Force article. Of course, I subscribed to the YouTube channel of the creator of this video, and also clicked on its like button. If the screencast creator comes back to look at this video in February, they’ll find that they have a number of new subscribers, a number of likes for the video and the video view count might be more than 100. All those indicators will be encouragement for them to make their next open source screencast. And so it goes. That’s how we support each other in the open source world.
  • School systems desperate for standards-aligned curricula find hope
    Open Up Resources is a nonprofit collaborative formed by 13 U.S. states that creates high-quality, standards-aligned open educational resources (OERs) that are openly licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. Unlike other providers, Open Up Resources provides curriculum-scale OER options; they believe that while many people seem to know where to find supplemental materials, most curriculum directors would not know where to look if they were planning a textbook adoption next year.
  • Visual Studio Test joins Microsoft's open source push [Ed: More openwashing of proprietary software from Microsoft, which interjects surveillance into compiled code]
  • Microsoft Open-Sources DirectX Shader Compiler [Ed: Windows lock-in.]

Red Hat's Survey in India

From Raspberry Pi to Supercomputers to the Cloud: The Linux Operating System

Linux is widely used in corporations now as the basis for everything from file servers to web servers to network security servers. The no-cost as well as commercial availability of distributions makes it an obvious choice in many scenarios. Distributions of Linux now power machines as small as the tiny Raspberry Pi to the largest supercomputers in the world. There is a wide variety of minimal and security hardened distributions, some of them designed for GPU workloads. Read more

IBM’s Systems With GNU/Linux

  • IBM Gives Power Systems Rebates For Linux Workloads
    Big Blue has made no secret whatsoever that it wants to ride the Linux wave up with the Power Systems platform, and its marketeers are doing what they can to sweeten the hardware deals as best they can without adversely affecting the top and bottom line at IBM in general and the Power Systems division in particular to help that Linux cause along.
  • Drilling Down Into IBM’s System Group
    The most obvious thing is that IBM’s revenues and profits continue to shrink, but the downside is getting smaller and smaller, and we think that IBM’s core systems business will start to level out this year and maybe even grow by the third or fourth quarter, depending on when Power9-based Power Systems and z14-based System z mainframes hit the market. In the final period of 2016, IBM’s overall revenues were $21.77 billion, down 1.1 percent from a year ago, and net income rose by nearly a point to $4.5 billion. This is sure a lot better than a year ago, when IBM’s revenues fell by 8.4 percent to $22 billion and its net income fell by 18.6 percent to $4.46 billion. For the full 2016 year, IBM’s revenues were off 2.1 percent to $79.85 billion, but its “real” systems business, which includes servers, storage, switching, systems software, databases, transaction monitors, and tech support and financing for its own iron, fell by 8.3 percent to $26.1 billion. (That’s our estimate; IBM does not break out sales this way, but we have some pretty good guesses on how it all breaks down.)