Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gadgets

Kali Linux for the Gemini PDA

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
Gadgets

Being basically a pimped up cell phone requires a convergence of Linux (glibc) and Android (bionic) to drive the hardware not yet natively supported by GNU/Linux. We are using components from the Halium project to achieve that.

Bringing GNU/Linux to the Gemini PDA, or any other mobile platform, is in the very early stages and some of it still needs a bit of work, such as data and voice support, GPS, power management, etc. There is currently one known issue with the Gemini having occasional issues when shutting down. The community is currently working on it.

Overall, it’s a very stable experience thanks to the hard work of the Sailfish and Gemian communities, in particular TheKit and adam_b, who brought Gemian to the Gemini PDA and helped a lot with this project.

Read more

GameShell Linux-based Console Upgraded: New Board, 1GB Ram, HDMI Port

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming
Gadgets

About a year ago, Clockwork put up a Linux-powered handheld gaming console called GameShell on Kickstarter website.

This portable retro console is shipped as a DIY kit that can let you play games, learn to code and also teach you a little about how the hardware works. And the best part is that it lets you upgrade the system without replacing it.

Read more

Happy Birthday Jolla Phone

Filed under
Gadgets

Jolla phone is now 5 years old!! We write this blog post while remembering all the emotions and hard work from the year 2013 when we launched the device to the public. We made it, we made an iconic Finnish product with a small but passionate team of engineers and designers. Despite the fact that half way through the development we had to redesign the hardware due to a new chipset and adapt Sailfish OS to it, we made it, we brought the first Jolla smartphone with blood, sweat and passion in it to the market. We saw room for another player, to come and disrupt the business of mobile operating systems. We showed the world that against all odds, it can be done, and it can be done with class!

Read more

Privacy-focused /e/ Smartphone OS Gets Support For More Devices

Filed under
OS
Gadgets

Previously, we have reported Android’s dominance and how vulnerable are we to its data extraction techniques. Today, I stumbled upon a project that might actually help save us from the “Google eco-system.”

In a community post, /e/ announced newly supported devices that can enjoy the privacy-focused operating system right away. These inlcude Google Pixel XL, OnePlus 5T, and many Xiaomi smartphones.

Read more

Linux Gadgets and Android-based, Linux-power ColorOS 6.0

Filed under
OS
Android
Linux
Gadgets
  • 12 Holiday Gifts for Your Linux Loved Ones (All Under $59)
  • ColorOS 6.0 Announced By Oppo, Welcome A Brighter OS With Machine Learning

    As stated above Oppo just announced their latest smartphone operating system called ColorOS 6.0. The ColorOS 6.0 brings a whole new UI with its light theme and brighter colours and is based on the latest Android 9.0. According to Oppo, the OS is made keeping bezel-less phones in mind but don’t worry, it doesn’t mean it won’t come to other Oppo phones, however, the navigation will be of more ease on devices with a comparably larger display. The list of devices that will support the new OS still hasn’t surfaced just yet.

    This new UI overhaul is breathtaking and as compared to the previous ColorOS 5.2.1 brings a lot more feature simultaneously being faster in performance and provides a better user experience. It uses a lighter color scheme combining with different soft gradients. Diving deeper into the UI section, ColorOS 6.0 brings a whole new font type. This new font type is called Oppo Sans made in collaboration with the Chinese font firm Hanyi.

Give the gift of freedom this year!

Filed under
GNU
Gadgets

As the end-of-the-year gift-giving season approaches, we have a dilemma: how do we give the people in our lives the gifts they want without subjecting them to software that violates their user freedoms? So many new gadgets are loaded with digital gremlins that can take all of the fun out of the holidays, using proprietary software to sneak in surveillance, Digital Restrictions Management (DRM), and other malware in along with the functions we actually want these items to serve.

Every year, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) offers you an easy solution: our Ethical Tech Giving Guide! The Giving Guide is back with version 9, and loaded with tech you can feel good about giving your loved ones -- and it also highlights some dangerous devices that are better left on the shelf.

We create resources like the Ethical Tech Giving Guide because software freedom is necessary to our overall freedom. Will you propel the free software movement to new frontiers by supporting the FSF? Our annual fundraiser is happening right now, and we want to welcome 400 new Associate Members before December 31st. As a special bonus, all new and renewing Annual Associate Members ($120+) can choose to receive a set of enamel pins. Become a member or make a donation today.

Read more

Sailfish 3 Day Celebration

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

The third generation of Sailfish OS is here, and we call it Sailfish 3! After months of hard work to get Sailfish 3 out in the wild, we have now released this rather big update to Sailfish powered devices. With that said, we surely wanted to celebrate the occasion and arranged two events: one in Helsinki, and another one in Berlin. Thanks to all of you who attended! Below a short description what happened, and what the mood was like.

Read more

Also: Smaller Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ Announced with 5GHz Wi-Fi and 1.4GHz CPU for $25

Samsung Linux on DeX beta hands-on: do almost everything on your phone

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu
Gadgets

Among the various Linux on Android implementations, Samsung’s Linux on DeX definitely looks the most polished ready to use solution, even if it’s still in beta form. Although it uses a two-year-old version of Ubuntu, there is already a lot that can be done from that. Plus, just like Android users, Linux users can be pretty creative and only time will tell if they’ll be able to use Linux on DeX to make almost any Linux distro work.

Read more

Samsung announce Linux on DeX with Ubuntu: for developers on the move

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
Gadgets

The Samsung Developer Conference, held this week in San Francisco, brings creators together to discover and learn about the latest technologies in Samsung’s portfolio and further afield. One of the technologies showcased, following the initial demo in 2017, is Samsung’s Linux on DeX. Samsung DeX, launched last year, lets users of Samsung flagship Galaxy devices enjoy apps on a bigger screen for a better viewing experience, whether watching films, playing games or just browsing the web.

This year, Samsung is announcing the beta launch of Linux on DeX which extends the value of Samsung DeX to Linux developers. Linux on DeX empowers developers to build apps within a Linux development environment by connecting their Galaxy device to a larger screen for a PC-like experience.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu Linux On Samsung Galaxy Devices Finally Reaches Beta (Samsung DeX)

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE/SUSE: 2018-2019 Elections Underway, SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 4, and 'Making the Selection' (Storage)

  • 2018-2019 Elections Underway with Calls for Candidates and New Members
    Earlier this week, on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, the Elections Committee posted the Schedule for the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections, along with the announcement of a Membership Drive and a call for nominations and applications for Candidates to fill three vacant seats on the openSUSE Board. The annual Board Elections are normally expected to run in November and December, with ballots cast and results published in time for the newly-elected Board Members to take their seats on the Board at the beginning of January. However, some additional work needed to be completed for this election, and the elections were delayed in part to accommodate the additional work.
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 4 is Generally Available
    SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 4 is now generally available. Service Pack 4 marks the fourth generation of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12, a major code stream and product foundation with a lifecycle from 2014 to 2024 plus Long Term Support (10+3 years). This release consolidates all fixes and updates introduced since SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 3.
  • Making the Selection
    You’ve likely read or heard a lot about today’s data explosion and how it’s affecting enterprises. After combing through all the overexcited rhetoric about how quickly data is multiplying or how many petabytes you’ll soon have to handle, one thing remains clear: You need to find a new way to store and manage your data or you’ll get left behind. While that mandate puts pressure on your organization to act quickly, it’s also the catalyst to a whole new world of exciting opportunities. More data can mean deeper, more accurate insights into your operations and customer needs, which empowers you to streamline processes and personalize experiences like never before. More data can also lead to greater innovation and new sources of revenue.

Programming/Development: mental illness, newt, and more

  • One developer's road: Programming and mental illness
    The next year, I went to college and learned about SUSE Linux 6.1 and the Java SE 1.2 programming language. Another student introduced me to free software and the GNU GPL License and helped me install SuSE 7.1 on my new Compaq Evo N160c notebook. There was no more Microsoft software on my computer. The GNU/Linux operating system was exactly what I wanted, offering editors, compilers, and a command line that did auto-completion. Six months later, I installed Debian GNU/Linux. Since YaST2 was just a front end to configuration files, I had to use Debian Potato. My bootloader of choice was LILO, and the Second Extended File System was reliable—not buggy, like ReiserFS. In spring 2002, I read a book about the C programming language. I wanted to learn to do UIs like javax.swing, and a friend recommended Gtk+ 2.0, which was about to be released. At this point, I stopped using the KDE Desktop Environment. Gnome 2 was different and provided anti-aliased fonts with hinting. I used it to play Chromium B.S.U., and KNOPPIX did the magic.
  • newt
    I've been helping teach robotics programming to students in grades 5 and 6 for a number of years. The class uses Lego models for the mechanical bits, and a variety of development environments, including Robolab and Lego Logo on both Apple ][ and older Macintosh systems. Those environments are quite good, but when the Apple ][ equipment died, I decided to try exposing the students to an Arduino environment so that they could get another view of programming languages. The Arduino environment has produced mixed results. The general nature of a full C++ compiler and the standard Arduino libraries means that building even simple robots requires a considerable typing, including a lot of punctuation and upper case letters. Further, the edit/compile/test process is quite long making fixing errors slow. On the positive side, many of the students have gone on to use Arduinos in science research projects for middle and upper school (grades 7-12). In other environments, I've seen Python used as an effective teaching language; the direct interactive nature invites exploration and provides rapid feedback for the students. It seems like a pretty good language to consider for early education -- "real" enough to be useful in other projects, but simpler than C++/Arduino has been. However, I haven't found a version of Python that seems suitable for the smaller microcontrollers I'm comfortable building hardware with.
  • Preventing "Revenge of the Ancillaries" in DevOps
  • Wing Python IDE Version 7 Early Access
  • What's the future of the pandas library?

Manjaro 18.0 Released – What’s New in Manjaro Illyria?

Manjaro is an Arch Linux-based Operating System developed in Austria, Germany, and France with a focus on providing a beautiful user-friendly OS with the full power of Arch Linux to beginner computer users and experts at the same time. If you are not already familiar with Manjaro Linux then the developers have recently given more reasons for you to by dropping its latest release, Manjaro 18.0, codenamed “Illyria“. This update brings both major and minor updates to the OS and makes its overall experience more pleasant. It is fulfilling to see how well an OS that began as a hobby project has come this far with several UI scripts, support for NVIDIA’s Optimus technology, etc. right out of the box – features that come together to enhance its user experience. For an overview of its features, check out the 10 Reasons to Use Manjaro Linux. Read more

Audiocasts: Kubecon, The Linux Link Tech Show and FLOSS Weekly With YottaDB

  • Keeping up with Kubernetes | TechSNAP 392
    A security vulnerability in Kubernetes causes a big stir, but we’ll break it all down and explain what went wrong. Plus the biggest stories out of Kubecon, and serverless gets serious.
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 787
  • FLOSS Weekly 510: YottaDB
    A lifelong hacker and geek, K.S. Bhaskar has been programming for almost half a century, and as a consequence of the technology gap between India and the US when he was an undergraduate, has programmed computers designed in the 1950s. He spent many years in the electronic test and measurement, and scientific computing worlds before moving to databases and the predecessor of YottaDB. He led GT.M, the predecessor of YottaDB from 1995 to 2017, before founding YottaDB in 2017 to take that code base – which by then felt to him like one of his children – to new markets and applications. Christopher is a true geek, and from a young start always wondered how the world works. He knew from a young age the computer field is where he was going to wind up working due to the infinite ways they could be used and cool things they could be made to do. Christopher has spent time in the healthcare industry working with YottaDB/GT.M/M and applying modern software development techniques to it. He also is a maker with more Raspberry Pis, Arduinos, other development boards, along with a 3d printer to keep himself busy.