Gadgets

Devices such as tablets, phones, etc.

Meet the DragonBox Pyra, the Linux DS equivalent

Filed under
Linux
Gaming
Gadgets

I’m a begrudging Linux user, specifically Ubuntu. It’s the result of being too cheap to buy software like Photoshop and too ethical to just steal it like everybody else. As a result I get to enjoy all the benefits of free software, including the attempts to develop the “perfect” portable console, like the DragonBox Pyra.

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The DragonBox Pyra Moves Closer As OpenPandora Successor

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Michael Mozrek gave a presentation recently about his work as the project lead on the DragonBox Pyra, the slated replacement to the Open Pandora handheld Linux game system.

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Could we See a Linux Tablet Brought to Life with Ubuntu Touch?

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu
Gadgets

Yes, some may argue that Android is molded from Linux Kernel, but the ability to be able to run bash scripts purely in a Linux environment that is not adulterated and polluted with non-Linux features is truly a tech Shangri-La for hardcore Linux lovers.

This helplessness in getting our wish fulfilled for a Linux tablet has many of us desperately digging for a solution that could satiate our thirst for Linux.

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Raspberry Pi 3D full-body scanner interview

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Development
Interviews
Gadgets

“In the last five to six years I began working with 3D printers and CNC machines. I started to build stuff, such as furniture and gadgets, and my first Raspberry Pi project was the Pi Snap Box. It’s the size of a mini-PC and is a box you put on the wall with one button on it. If you press the button, it takes three photos. It posts the first photo to a Facebook account for whoever the box belongs to. So for example, if you hang it up in a hairdresser’s salon and get your hair done all nicely, people could then see the good results on the hairdresser’s Facebook page.

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Cheery social robot owes it all to its inner Linux

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Linux
Gadgets

An MIT spinoff has launched an Indiegogo campaign for a $499, Linux-based “Jibo” robot billed as a social, self-learning companion for families.

Like SoftBank’s Aldeberan-built Pepper, the Jibo bot runs on Linux and is designed to communicate and interact with people in a social, human-like manner. While the $1,930 Pepper is dubbed an “emotional” robot, Jibo is referred to as a “social” robot, and sells for a modest $499, via its $100,000 Indiegogo campaign. The device is expected to ship to funders Dec. 2015, followed by a commercial launch in 2016.

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Apple iPhone 6 Clone Surfaces in China as CCTV Cautions Against iPhone Usage, Fearing NSA Spying

Filed under
Android
Linux
Mac
Gadgets

However, it's still believed to be Android at play here that has been tweaked enough to offer an iOS like UI, claims 9to5Mac.

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“World’s first” iris recognition smartwatch runs Android

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Android
Gadgets

IriTech has launched an Indiegogo project for an Android-based “Fidelys” smartwatch with iris recognition technology and a rotating-clicking bezel for I/O.

The main draw of the Fidelys is its “military grade” iris recognition technology, which avoids the need for vulnerable, inconvenient, hard to remember passwords, says IriTech. By visually verifying one’s iris, the technology can lock/unlock the Fidelys device itself, as well as encrypt/decrypt files and data, and control the launch of applications on Bluetooth connected mobile devices. It would also appear the Fidelys can talk directly to other smart devices such as door locks and various authentication devices.

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Android Wear gets more features through widgets

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Android
Gadgets

So you have Android Wear! Maybe you have Google Glass! Want to check the football scores without having to go through the hassle of digging your phone out of your pocket? Well, know you can thanks to ‘Wearable Widgets’.

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Disagreements Arise Over the Prospects for Android Wear

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Android
Gadgets

When Android itself first arrived, it took some time succeed as well, as I noted in a post on OStatic back in 2009. Then, almost no phones shown at Mobile World Congress ran the platform. Since then, Google has shown that it can create strong markets for open mobile platforms.

In all likelihood, we'll see Google offer incentives for developers to rally around Android Wear, and incentives for buyers. There, too, Google has prior experience, as it has incentivized users and developers surrounding both Android and Chrome OS.

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Why Android One was Google’s most important announcement at I/O

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Android
Linux
Gadgets

Reaching out to the next billion connected users is a phrase that has been tossed around liberally.

Mozilla used it when they announced their $25 smartphone initiative. Nokia’s (now Microsoft’s) Stephen Elop used it when Nokia launched the revamped Nokia Asha line last year, and again when he announced the Nokia X. Last year Google used the same phrase as it launched Android 4.4 KitKat.

However, these companies’ efforts are still to leave a mark in the countries where the supposed next billion connected customers reside. Firefox’ $25 smartphones are yet to enter the market, neither Nokia’s Asha nor X line have turned out to be “hot items”, while affordable smartphones running KitKat are still few and far between.

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Also: No Facebook, no iPhone, no problem: how I declared my digital independence

Improve Literacy – Open Source Software with Lowest Cost Tablet, Aakash

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Android
Linux
Gadgets

A “Spoken Tutorial” is a ten minute audio-video tutorial for K – 12 lessons and modules on “Aakash” (meaning Sky in Sanskrit), the world’s lowest cost device at $50. The spoken part of Tutorials is dubbed in all Indian languages, to help kids weak in English.

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Six Linux home automation clicks

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Long before people were talking about the Internet of Things, Linux-based home automation systems were available. Here are some of today's most interesting Linux-powered home gadgets.

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Chumby back from the dead with 1,000 apps

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Chumby, which sold Linux-based tabletop devices that ran Flash-based apps, is back in business under Blue Octy, with an overhauled website and 1,000 apps.

Chumby Industries went out of business a year ago, leaving Chumby owners and subscribers in the lurch. Blue Octy LLC, quickly snatched up the assets and revamped the website. As reported first by Engadget, the company has now reopened the Chumby service.

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BrickPi Bookreader 2 interview

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
Gadgets

A robotic, mechanical reader of printed books that melds together the Raspberry Pi and Lego Mindstorms.

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Android Wear review: the everything inbox

Filed under
Android
Gadgets

It's not just email either, though it tends to take the brunt of everybody's anger. There are dozens of apps sending us hundreds of notifications; managing all that incoming information is a genuine hassle. Looking at the notification center on our phones, it's hard not to imagine some harried, 1930s office worker. His tie is loosened, sleeves rolled up, sweat beading on his forehead underneath a green visor as he looks at the metal tray marked "INBOX" on his desk. It's piled high with a stack of paper, sent to him from people he doesn't know and doesn't love.

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The Samsung Galaxy Z: Tizen OS a big Risk? Specifications and Comparison

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

The Samsung Galaxy Z is the wave of the future. It’s Tizen OS is cutting edge and will be the standard for smartphones in the future. It is a quality phone that is worth every penny.

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Smartwatch Battle: Pebble Steel vs. Galaxy Gear 2

Filed under
Android
Gadgets

Before Google comes in with its own smartwatches, consumers have two mainstream devices to choose from. On one hand, there is the Galaxy Gear 2, coming from a reputed brand like Samsung and there's Pebble Steel by Pebble Technology Corporation that gained popularity after a successful Kickstarter funding campaign for their first watch.

When we consider the turf of wearable devices, there's nothing much to boast of, except, of course, Google Glass. Apart from Pebble and Gear, the tech industry is impatiently waiting for the Motorola smartwatch, which will be made in collaboration with Google. The wait, however, doesn't have to be this hard. If you are someone who wants to get their hands on a smartwatch right now, both the Pebble and the Gear 2 are excellent choices. Both have their own merits, and also their own demerits. But then, which to choose between the two? Well, that's why we are here. In this article, we'll be doing a quick comparison between the Pebble Steel smartwatch and the Galaxy Gear 2. Let's see who wins.

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Rugged, shape-shifting handheld runs Android

Filed under
Android
Gadgets

Motorola Solutions unveiled a rugged, enterprise handheld that runs Android 4.1, 1D or 2D scanning, and offers a choice of brick, gun, or turret styles.

When Motorola split into Motorola Mobility and Motorola Solutions back in 2011, Motorola Mobility was supposed to be the Android company and Motorola Solutions the Windows company. Yet, the latter, which produces a range of enterprise solutions including 4G wireless equipment, has done quite well with its Android-ready enterprise handhelds.

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This is the Gear Live, Samsung's $199 Android Wear Smartwatch

Filed under
Android
Gadgets

Wearables were everywhere today at Google I/O, but there was only one truly new product announced: the Galaxy Live, Samsung's Android Wear-running smartwatch. And we've had a chance to spend a few minutes playing with a demo unit — it's only able to do a few things right now, but we have our best sense yet of what Android Wear hardware and software will look like. This is one of the key devices for Android Wear, one of the watches being given to all attendees of the conference, and at first glance it's quite nice.

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Nest Labs buys Dropcam, gains Linux-based cams

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Nest Labs is buying Dropcam for $555 million, and will integrate Dropcam’s Linux-based surveillance cameras into its own Linux-based home automation system.

Nest’s deal to acquire Dropcam for $555 million was revealed by Recode and confirmed in a Nest blog post by co-founder Matt Rogers. The acquisition follows Nest’s own acquisition by Google for $3.2 billion, announced back in January.

The home surveillance company’s Linux-based cameras will be integrated within Nest’s own Linux-based product line, including a smart thermostat and smoke detector (see farther below). The Dropcam team will move from San Francisco to Nest’s offices in Palo Alto.

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