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Gadgets

Trying to Make Sense of Fuchsia

Filed under
Linux
Google
Gadgets
  • Is Fuschsia Google’s answer to Samsung’s Tizen?

    Google is prepping an open source “Fuchsia” OS that can target IoT, handhelds, and laptops. It uses a new “Magenta” kernel, based on the “LK” project.

    Google has posted GitHub code for an emerging operating system called Fuchsia, designed for a wide range of devices. Like Google’s Android, Chrome OS, and IoT-focused Brillo, Fuchsia is open source — but unlike those platforms, it’s not based on the Linux kernel. Instead, it taps an independent, MIT licensed kernel project called “Little Kernel” (LK), which has been under development for several years.

  • Will Google replace Android with Fuchsia?

    Android is one of the most widely used operating systems in the world. But never let it be said that Google is content to rest on past achievements. The company has been hard at work on a new operating system call Fuchsia, and some are wondering if it will eventually replace Android.

  • Google May Paint IoT Fuchsia

    A team at Google is working on a new operating system called "Fuchsia," but details are sparse. Fuchsia "is a new open source project that is not at all related to Android or Chrome OS," said Google spokesperson Joshua Cruz. He declined to provide further details about Fuchsia, saying only that "we have many revolving open source projects at Google." Fuchsia reportedly already has undergone some testing, and it is booting "reasonably well" on NUCs based on Intel's Skylake and Broadwell processors.

  • Why Google’s new Linux-less Fuchsia operating system is a huge deal

    Google has release all the components of the new operating system in a much more permissible MIT license. The community can try it, contribute to it and reuse it.

    Raspberry Pi 3 users will soon be able to play with Fuchsia, according to Google developer Travis Geiselbrecht, who is working on the project.

Linux Phones

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Creating a real GNU/Linux phone os

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

I just want Linux on my phone. I love Android, it has a decent app ecosystem. I like the idea of Ubuntu Touch but I absolutely don't like the design guidelines. The problem is that both operating systems are missing the things from Linux I like. Technically they both run on a version of the Linux kernel but what I want is the GNU userland, Xorg/Wayland, the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard, and my own choice of desktop environment or window manager.

I know quite a lot programming languages enough to make some applications, I dont want to learn 3 new ones for 3 mobile platforms. I don't want to write my app in javascript, java or swift.

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Phones With Linux

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
Gadgets

New Chips Give Linux a Hand in Wearables

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Aside from the Tizen-based Samsung Gear S2, and a dozen or so Android-based Android Wear watches, Linux has been something of a no-show in the smartwatch market. Most lower-end watches skip the overhead of Linux in favor of simpler RTOS-based devices running on MCUs.

Yet Linux got a boost into wearables this week when Qualcomm, whose Snapdragon chips fuel most Android Wear watches, announced a Snapdragon Wear 1100 system-on-chip for lower-end smartwatches and wearables. The 28nm-fabricated SoC is built around a single Cortex-A7 core that can be clocked to 1.2GHz.

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Movidius Fathom — This USB Stick Converts Any Linux Computer Into An A.I. Supercomputer

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

Chip maker Movidius has unveiled “the world’s first embedded neural network accelerator”. Known as the Fathom Neural Compute Stick, this device could be plugged into a Linux device to allow it to perform functions like image recognition, language comprehension, and pattern detection.

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Also: Concurrent Introduces RedHawk Linux for 64-Bit ARM® Processors

Debian Handheld Pre-orders, GNOME Scores RH Servers

Filed under
Debian
Gadgets
-s

From (some of) the folks that brought you Pandora comes new Linux gaming handheld Pyra. Pre-orders are now being taken. The Free Software Foundation filed a comment with the U.S. Copyright Office calling for an end to JavaScript requirements on government websites. Red Hat recently donated two servers to the GNOME project and Nick Heath examined a draft of the Munich Open Source report. Douglas DeMaio posted of Tumbleweed updates and vulnerabilities in ImageMagick have webmasters scrambling.

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DragonBox Pyra

Filed under
Gaming
Gadgets
  • DragonBox Pyra Goes Up For Pre-Order

    It's been a while since last hearing anything about the DragonBox Pyra as an open-source gaming handheld system and successor to OpenPandora...

  • Bitcoin is Now Accepted For DragonBox Pyra Pre-orders

    It is always good to see new merchants accepting Bitcoin payments, as it goes to show businesses want to attract an international clientele. DragonBox, a ship based in Germany, recently started accepting Bitcoin payments for their Pyra computer. A neat little device, which packs quite the punch.

  • DragonBox Pyra pre-orders begin (open Source handheld gaming PC)

    The DragonBox Pyra is a portable computer that looks like a cross between a tiny laptop and a Nintendo DX game console… and it kind of works like a cross between those devices as well. It’s got a 5 inch display, a QWERTY keyboard, the Debian Linux operating system that can handle desktop apps as well as games, and physical gaming buttons.

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