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Gadgets

BQ Aquaris E5 HD Ubuntu Edition Is Now Available for Sale

Filed under
Ubuntu
Gadgets

The latest Aquaris E5 HD Ubuntu Edition from the Spanish company BQ is now available for purchase on the official website. This latest Ubuntu phone was announced just a couple of weeks ago and it's finally here.

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The Ubuntu Phone That Transforms into a PC Will Be Built by BQ

Filed under
Ubuntu
Gadgets

Canonical is still quite eager to have a "convergence" device out into the wild and it looks that BQ will be the company to build it.

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Canonical and GE reveal how a chance encounter led to an Ubuntu-powered IoT fridge

Filed under
Ubuntu
Gadgets

CANONICAL AND GE have been telling The INQUIRER more about the work that they, along with other partners, have been doing towards automation with Snappy Ubuntu Core.

The partnership with FirstBuild, GE's experiment-driven subsidiary, has already led to Chillhub, an open source, moddable smart fridge powered by Ubuntu.

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Leaked Images of the upcoming Samsung Z2 Tizen Smart Phone?

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

We have mentioned previously about the rumoured upcoming Samsung Z2 Smartphone and an un-named Global Tizen Smartphone. Well today these are allegedly leaked images of the Samsung Z2, a Tizen based Quad core Smartphone with 1Gb memory, 540 x 960 Screen to be released 1H 2015, which is potentially only a few weeks away.

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Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Works Great As A Linux Ultrabook

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Linux
Gadgets

Lenovo's new X1 Carbon is made of carbon-fiber construction as implied by its name and is very thin and light at 0.70" and just under three pounds. Lenovo claims that the X1 Carbon can last up to 10.9 hours with its lone battery, and continues with all of the features collected over the years with the various ThinkPad laptops/ultrabooks. This third-generation X1 Carbon also has much anticipated improvements to the keyboard and touchpad/trackpoint.

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Linux-powered quadcopter acts like a smart shuttlecock

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

On Kickstarter, Zyro is pitching a “DroneBall” quadcopter that runs Linux on Gumstix COMs and acts like a smart aerial ball for multi-player games.

The Zyro DroneBall doesn’t look like a ball — nor does it act like any ball you’ve ever seen that isn’t made of Flubber. The quadcopter can hover, zig, and zag within a virtual aerial arena, mimicking a hockey puck, soccer ball, or an Ultimate Frisbee disc, says Zyro. It can even take the role of an extra player on the field interacting with another DroneBall.

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All Ubuntu Phones Are Now Sold Out, New Flash Sale at 3PM CET

Filed under
Ubuntu
Gadgets

Amazing, simply amazing! We have no idea how many Ubuntu phone units were sold today, but after only three hours all available BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition smartphones were sold out. Looks like the Ubuntu community in Europe is really strong, as they also had to face some server issues with BQ’s online store, which apparently was not prepared for a large crowd.

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Also The Second Batch of Ubuntu Phones Was Sold Out in Ten Minutes

BQ Says They Received 12,000 Ubuntu Phone Orders Per Minute

Sony SmartWatch 3 Review: The Best-Performing Android Smartwatch Yet

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Reviews
Gadgets

Sony's been trying the smartwatch thing for years, but the original SmartWatch and the SmartWatch 2 both... what's the word I'm looking for here? Sucked? Yeah. But the SmartWatch 3 has solid performance and two nifty features you won't find on any other Android Wear. It's the first with built-in GPS and a screen you can read without backlighting.

Android Wear watches are off to a pretty decent start. The Moto 360, the LG G Watch R, and the Asus ZenWatch are all lovely and useful in their own ways. So why might you buy a Sony smartwatch instead?

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How About a Chromebook on Steroids?

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Gadgets

There’s been a lot of interesting Linux news of late. Not just GNU/Linux, but all types of Linux, Android, Chrome OS, Firefox OS, embedded (IoT), cloud computing, cars, TVs, just about anything you can think of. But truth be told, I’d like to see more Linux on the desktop — just as Linus Torvalds said he would like to see that.

The recent purchase of a Chromebook for my son got me thinking about a new opportunity for Linux on the desktop. This is not an idea for getting a standard GNU/Linux desktop to automagically replace all existing Windows desktops, but to leverage the cloud computing paradigm with a bulked­-up Chromebook-­like system that would be workable for 80 to 90 percent of personal, school, and business needs.

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Dell's super thin, aluminum Venue 8 7000 is a surprisingly solid Android tablet

Filed under
Android
Gadgets

But companies are indeed bothering to make new designs and try different approaches to the tried and true tablet formula. The latest of which is Dell, which recently launched the clumsily named Venue 8 7000 Series (I’m just going to call it the Venue 8). The $399 Venue 8 is part of a design renaissance at Dell (along with the new XPS 13 laptop), showcasing premium materials and killer displays. It also acts as a vehicle for some never-before-seen mobile technologies from Intel. There are really two things that matter with the Venue 8, and they're why anyone is spending time talking about it: its design and its camera array.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.14-rc2

I'm back to my usual Sunday release schedule, and rc2 is out there in all the normal places. This was a fairly usual rc2, with a very quiet beginning of the week, and then most changes came in on Friday afternoon and Saturday (with the last few ones showing up Sunday morning). Normally I tend to dislike how that pushes most of my work into the weekend, but this time I took advantage of it, spending the quiet part of last week diving instead. Anyway, the only unusual thing worth noting here is that the security subsystem pull request that came in during the merge window got rejected due to problems, and so rc2 ends up with most of that security pull having been merged in independent pieces instead. Read more Also: Linux 4.14-rc2 Kernel Released

Manjaro Linux Phasing out i686 (32bit) Support

In a not very surprising move by the Manjaro Linux developers, a blog post was made by Philip, the Lead Developer of the popular distribution based off Arch Linux, On Sept. 23 that reveals that 32-bit support will be phased out. In his announcement, Philip says, “Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that v17.0.3 ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Manjaro Linux. September and October will be our deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported.” Read more

Korora 26 'Bloat' Fedora-based Linux distro available for download -- now 64-bit only

Fedora is my favorite Linux distribution, but I don't always use it. Sometimes I opt for an operating system that is based on it depending on my needs at the moment. Called "Korora," it adds tweaks, repositories, codecs, and packages that aren't found in the normal Fedora operating system. As a result, Korora deviates from Red Hat's strict FOSS focus -- one of the most endearing things about Fedora. While you can add all of these things to Fedora manually, Korora can save you time by doing the work for you. Read more

BackSlash Linux Olaf

While using BackSlash, I had two serious concerns. The first was with desktop performance. The Plasma-based desktop was not as responsive as I'm used to, in either test environment. Often times disabling effects or file indexing will improve the situation, but the desktop still lagged a bit for me. My other issue was the program crashes I experienced. The Discover software manager crashed on me several times, WPS crashed on start-up the first time on both machines, I lost the settings panel once along with my changes in progress. These problems make me think BackSlash's design may be appealing to newcomers, but I have concerns with the environment's stability. Down the road, once the developers have a chance to iron out some issues and polish the interface, I think BackSlash might do well targeting former macOS users, much the same way Zorin OS tries to appeal to former Windows users. But first, I think the distribution needs to stabilize a bit and squash lingering stability bugs. Read more