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Gadgets

The Neo900 Phone Project Is Still Happening

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

The Neo900 project remains an effort to provide a motherboard replacement for the once-popular Nokia N900 smart-phone while carrying on the tradition of the OpenMoko project.

The Neo900 project has been talked about for many months and there's finally some new news... It turns out the Neo900 is making some progress but Golden Delicious Computers is stepping down from their role and issuing refunds as it's cancelled the project, meanwhile there's a new organization to take its place. The developers say Golden Delicious Computers cancelling the project "[fixes] the organizational structure issues and move everything forward."

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Is the Internet of Things fully ARMed?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

Providing the tool chains to exploit these processors in applications is the DS-5 Development Studio. This has recently been upgraded with a new version of the ARM Compiler tool chain - ARM Compiler 6. This tool chain is a complete break from previous versions, building on the open-source LLVM modular compiler infrastructure including the Clang C/C++ compiler front end. ARM has always devoted effort to supporting Clang, and also LLVM, as well as Eclipse, GNU, and other open-source activities. While the shipped versions of the ARM Compiler 6 will be closed-source binary, ARM anticipates that it will continue to devote considerable resources to the open-source effort alongside other collaborators. Somewhere, someone has said that the advantage of using a commercial release of an open-source product is that you get all the advantages of the input of the contributing community, but when you hit a snag you can pick up the phone and talk to the supplier, rather than having to hunt through a forum to see if anyone else has solved the same problem.

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Gear 2 Watch Giveaway at Tizen Developer Conference

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Linux
Gadgets

I've gotten a number of questions about this, so just to clear things up - yes, we are planning to give Gear 2 watches to Tizen Developer Conference attendees.

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LG releases G Watch promo video, promises to define the smartwatch

Filed under
Android
Gadgets

Ahead of the expected summertime release of LG’s new G Watch, their Android Wear-powered smartwatch, LG is building some hype by giving us a little glamour video of the watch.

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Also: Yet another leaked picture of the LG G3 shows all three color versions

Ouya Portable Developed? Modder Creates Mobile 720p Version Of Open Source Console

Filed under
Android
Linux
Gadgets

A modder who goes by the name Downing has developed a portable version of the game system, which he revealed on his website. It's powered by batteries and boasts a 7-inch, 720p display. Downing showed off his Ouya Portable in pictures and a video, which you can see below.

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Marmalade CEO: Tizen is App Developers' Entryway to Wearables

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Linux
Gadgets

Tizen has created an opportunity for app developers to expand into wearable technologies, says Marmalade Technologies CEO, Harvey Elliott. Hundreds of games have already been added to the Tizen app store since Marmalade began offering SDK support last year for the Linux-based mobile operating system, he said. And this is just the beginning.

Developers who are interested in learning how to port their games and enterprise applications to Tizen on the Marmalade cross-platform development tool can learn all about it at the Tizen Developer Conference, June 2-4 at the Hilton Union Square in San Francisco. Here Elliott gives us a preview of his talk at the conference and discusses Marmalade's interest and involvement in Tizen.

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Do we really need more giant phablets?

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Gadgets

Giant phablet phones seem to be all the rage these days. Everywhere you look you see people walking around with these huge suckers attached to the side of their heads. But are larger screen phones really better? And what about those of us who might…gasp!…actually prefer smaller screens? I can’t help but feel that perhaps the big screen phone trend has gotten completely out of control among phone manufacturers and their customers.

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Linux-based K-9 doppelganger treads ELC

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Linux
Gadgets

At the Embedded Linux Conference, Intel’s new Open Hardware Technical Evangelist showed off a Linux- and MinnowBoard based robot that mimics Doctor Who’s K-9.

The high correlation between science fiction fans and techies reaches its zenith with the BBC show Doctor Who. But who knew that showing off one’s inner Time Lord could actually be a winning career move? Last fall at the Embedded Linux Conference Europe in Edinburgh, Scotland, Red Hat engineer John “Warthog9″ Hawley demonstrated a robot based on Doctor Who’s robotic dog K-9. His treadwheel bot runs Angstrom Linux on Intel’s open spec, Atom-based MinnowBoard single-board computer, the forerunner of the new MinnowBoard Max.

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Samsung Galaxy K Zoom packs 20.7 MP camera, 10x optical zoom

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Android
Gadgets

We had anticipated that a special “camera” version of Samsung’s flagship device will be launched soon and here it is finally with the moniker ‘Galaxy K Zoom’. The device boasts of a 20.7-megapixel BSI CMOS sensor and 10X optical Zoom. This is not the first time Samsung has attempted to put zoom lenses on the back of a smartphone. Last year’s Samsung Galaxy S4 Zoom featured similar 10x optical zoom, but it was a bulky mess, while Galaxy K Zoom has managed to keep a much slimmer profile at 0.8 inch thickness.

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Linux engineer builds Raspberry Pi-based Piphone for $158

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

A LINUX ENGINEER has built the first smartphone based on a Raspberry Pi computer, and has cleverly named it the Piphone.

Liz Upton of the Raspberry Pi Foundation lauded the device in a blog post on Friday, largely due to the fact that it cost just $158 to build. What's more, the Piphone is constructed entirely from off the shelf components, which means "there's no soldering required, and no fiddly electronics work," she said.

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More in Tux Machines

Speeding up the Debian installer using eatmydata and dpkg-divert

The Debian installer could be a lot quicker. When we install more than 2000 packages in Skolelinux / Debian Edu using tasksel in the installer, unpacking the binary packages take forever. A part of the slow I/O issue was discussed in bug #613428 about too much file system sync-ing done by dpkg, which is the package responsible for unpacking the binary packages. Other parts (like code executed by postinst scripts) might also sync to disk during installation. All this sync-ing to disk do not really make sense to me. If the machine crash half-way through, I start over, I do not try to salvage the half installed system. So the failure sync-ing is supposed to protect against, hardware or system crash, is not really relevant while the installer is running. Read more

Samsung's first open-source conference kicks off, with Tizen on its mind

The inaugural Samsung Open-Source Conference opens Tuesday morning in Seoul, with keynotes from well-known figures in the open source world and a hackathon focused on Tizen, the company’s in-house mobile operating system. The event kicks off with a speech from Jono Bacon, the former community manager for Ubuntu, who recently moved to the XPrize Foundation, and also includes talks from Linux kernel developer Tejun Heo and Carsten Heitzler, the principal creator of the Enlightenment desktop environment for Linux. Read more Also: Samsung Electronics to host first open-source conference

Flockport Rivals Docker with Open Source Container Virtualization

Is there more to container-based open source virtualization than Docker? A startup named Flockport thinks so, and has launched a website for sharing and deploying virtual apps using Linux Containers (LXC), an alternative to Docker. Read more

OpenDaylight executive director spells out where this open source SDN efforts stand

So if I compare it to Linux. Linux is in my computer, in my car, it’s in a million things outside of the server room. In the same way I think a large percentage of OpenDaylight will be used and leveraged that way. You will have a few people who grab the code, compile it themselves and deploy it in their environment, but mostly for a proof of concept (POC). If an end user hears about SDN and thinks it’s great, they might find themselves needing to POC 15 different solutions. Do I need an overlay? Well, you’ve got to look at three or four overlays out there because they all do things differently. And if you want to figure out how to use OpenFlow, well there are different flavors of OpenFlow, so you’re going to pull a couple of different ones. Read more