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Sailfish OS "Nurmonjoki" Released and Eelo Beta

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OS
Gadgets
  • Sailfish OS Nurmonjoki is now available

    After a very warm summer here in Northern Europe, many well deserved holidays are taken and many sailors are now rested after a year of full-on work. Sailors that were on duty during the summer have however worked on the latest iteration of Sailfish OS updates for our beloved community! After much developing and testing, we are now ready to release Sailfish OS 2.2.1. Sailfish OS 2.2.1 is named after the river Nurmonjoki which is located 300km north of Helsinki, on south western part of Finland.

  • Sailfish OS "Nurmonjoki" Released For GDPR Compliance, App Updates

    While Jolla's Linux-based Sailfish OS mobile operating system hasn't turned out to be as great as many anticipated, today the Finnish company released Sailfish OS 2.2.1 under the Nurmonjoki codename.

  • /e/ first beta soon to be released

    Next week, on Tuesday or Wednesday, we will release the first beta of /e/ mobile OS.

    I will then describe choices that have been done, what’s in, what’s not in, what remains to do, what to test and how. And probably a challenge for testers.

    [...]

    Of course we cannot support the 17K+ known Android devices. As the /e/ ROM itself is forked from LineageOS we can build for all LOS 14.1 (Android Nougat) supported devices, and not yet for LOS 15 (Android Oreo) supported devices (work in progress).

ZeroPhone Is “Coming Soon”: A Raspberry Pi-Based, Linux-Powered Phone For Just $50

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

With data security and privacy becoming an alarming issue while dealing with the data-hungry companies, ZeroPhone seems like a sigh of relief.

ZeroPhone is a Raspberry Pi-based, open-source, Linux-powered handset that has been launched as a project on Crowd Supply; we’ve already told you about the phone in the past. The device promises no carrier locks, no pre-loaded apps and good riddance from harvesting of data without users’ knowledge.

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Devices Leftovers

Filed under
Android
Gadgets
  • Rugged, in-vehicle touch-panel PCs support camera and wireless expansion

    The VMC touch-panel PCs are designed for in-vehicle use in warehouses, ports, and other logistic and material applications. The systems support -30 to 60°C temperatures with ambient air flow and offer 10% to 90% (non-condensing) humidity tolerance. Vibration resistance is rated at MIL-STD-810G, 514.6 Procedure 1, Category 4, and shock resistance complies with MIL-STD-810G, Method 516.6, Procedure I and V (crash hazard), says Nexcom.

  • Let’s get Chatty!

    Today we provide a technical update and demonstration of SMS and end-to-end encrypted XMPP messages on the chat application we’re developing, Chatty. But first, a bit of historical context…

  • Purism Developing "Chatty" For SMS Support On The Librem 5

    Purism shared today about the work they are engaged in on supporting SMS messaging with their in-development Librem 5 smartphone.

    For handling SMS messaging, Purism is developing an application they -- at least for now -- are calling Chatty. This Chatty code will effectively serve as a plug-in for libpurple (of Pidgin instant messaging fame) that interfaces with ModemManager. Libpurple of course supports many different messaging platforms/protocols and is most often associated with Pidgin but could be adapted by other clients.

  • Skagen Falster 2 fitness smartwatch announced – Runs Wear OS

    The International Consumer Electronics Show (CES), which usually takes places in Las Vegas, is a place that many tech companies showcase their upcoming consumer electronics technologies. Tech breakthroughs have been experienced there since June 1967 (wow). This year at CES 2018, Skagen announced their first smartwatch – called the Falster. It was an admirable watch but did have some drawbacks, such as the poor battery life and some missing features. Now, several months later, the company is in the process of already releasing the Falster 2 and it starts shipping on September 12th. You can expect it soon.

    [...]

    Although this all may sound great, the Falster 2 is still powered by the quite old Snapdragon Wear 2100 chip and will become outdated pretty soon. If you’re still interested in buying the watch regardless, you can buy it at Skagen’s very own site. The silicone and leather band types cost $275 while the steel-mesh ones cost that little more at $295.

  • Xiaomi Poco F1 Launcher Arrives On Google Play Store

Devices: Tizen, OpenZWave, and Ibase

Filed under
Hardware
Gadgets
  • Samsung Galaxy Watch, Running Tizen, is Launched

    Today, as expected, Samsung have launched a new smartwatch, the Samsung Galaxy Watch, yes, the name change is real (previously it has been known as the Gear S4). At the Samsung Unpacked event, we were given the Note 9 and the Galaxy Watch. The big headline for us is the watch will not be running Wear OS, as speculated once upon a time, but the Galaxy Watch will be running Tizen 4.0.

    We will have two models to choose from: 46mm available in silver and a 42mm black and rose gold versions. Samsung have realised that “one size does not fit all” and some might find a smaller watch face appealing.

  • Building a better thermostat with Home Assistant

    Next, I needed to look at software to use my hardware acquisitions as a thermostat. While all my devices were Z-Wave, and OpenZWave provides both C++ and Python interfaces I could use to access and control my devices, it was a bit too low-level for my taste.

    Instead, I decided to use the Home Assistant project, for a few reasons. First, I know a bunch of people who use it, hack on it, or both. Second, while all my current devices are Z-Wave, Home Assistant will let me branch out to use other kinds of devices if I want. Home Assistant supports a ton of different devices and services—you can look at the component list to see them all. For Z-Wave support, it leverages OpenZWave and provides a higher level interface that is a bit easier to deal with. Home Assistant is written in Python 3, which is very convenient for me since I do most of my programming in Python. It also has an active community that has been responsive and helpful.

    I installed Home Assistant on one of my servers and proceeded to configure its interface with my devices. There is a lot of detailed information available on setting up Home Assistant—you can refer to the official documentation for a starting point. For specific Z-Wave instructions, see the Z-Wave section in the Home Assistant docs.

    After setting up Home Assistant, I had a single web interface and API for controlling my new power switches and displaying data from the MultiSensor. But, I still didn't have a thermostat—just a pretty interface (that I could use remotely) for manually turning the AC on or off.

  • IP65 protected panel PCs feature Apollo Lake or Core-U chips

    Ibase announced three open-frame panel PCs with Linux support. The 15-inch, 1024 x 768 OFP-151-PC and 21-inch, 1920 x 1080 OFP-2100-PC run on the Pentium N4200 while the 21-inch OFP-2101-PC offers a choice of 7th Gen Core-U CPUs.

    Ibase, which last year launched an SE-102-N signage player, has now returned with a pair of fanless, open-frame touch-panel PCs that similarly run Linux 4.x or Windows 10 on an Intel Apollo Lake SoC. The 15-inch, 1024 x 768 OFP-151-PC and 21-inch, 1920 x 1080 OFP-2100-PC ship with a quad-core, 1.1/2.5GHz Pentium N4200 with 6W TDP.

ZX Spectrum Vega+ blows a FUSE: It runs open-source emulator

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Hardware
Gadgets

The ZX Spectrum Vega+ is running open-source Spectrum emulator software FUSE, The Register has confirmed while carrying out a hands-on review of the handheld console.

As regular readers know, the Vega+ is the flagship product of Retro Computers Ltd, the company which took £513,000 in crowdfunded cash from members of the public to produce handheld ZX Spectrum-themed gaming consoles. It failed to deliver any for two years and then belatedly emitted what appear to be several dozen of the devices last week.

With public interest at an all-time high in what the company has actually produced during the ongoing scandal, El Reg acquired one from an RCL customer for review purposes.

No instructions were supplied with the console. In time-honoured retro gaming fashion, The Register’s crack review team resorted to button-mashing to figure out what did what.

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Galaxy Watch will run Tizen 4.0

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

In May, Samsung trademarked the “Galaxy Watch” and “Galaxy Fit” monikers at the USPTO, suggesting its plan to bring its wearables under the Galaxy branding. Now two months later, SamMobile confirms that Samsung’s next smartwatch, the successor to the Gear S3, will indeed be called the Galaxy Watch, and not Gear S4. Furthermore, they add that the upcoming Galaxy Watch will run Tizen 4.0 out of the box.

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Nintendo Found a Way to Patch an Unpatchable Coldboot Exploit in Nintendo Switch

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Security
Gadgets

If you plan on buying a Nintendo Switch gaming console to run Linux on it using the "unpatchable" exploit publicly disclosed a few months ago, think again because Nintendo reportedly fixed the security hole.

Not long ago, a team of hackers calling themselves ReSwitched publicly disclosed a security vulnerability in the Nvidia Tegra X1 chip, which they called Fusée Gelée and could allow anyone to hack a Nintendo Switch gaming console to install a Linux-based operating system and run homebrew code and apps using a simple trick.

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Nintendo Switch can now run GameCube games – with an emulator and Linux

Filed under
Linux
Gaming
Gadgets

Great news, everyone: you can now play GameCube games on your Nintendo Switch – but only with a considerable amount of hacking your console. The Switch can at last run GameCube games through an emulator hosted on a Linux distribution loaded onto the console.

The development was made by YouTube user Mizumi, who uploaded a video of the Dolphin GameCube emulator program running on Lakka, a Linux distribution for game consoles that looks a lot like the PlayStation 4 interface using a front-end known as RetroArch.

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Botond Ballo: Review of the Purism Librem 13

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Reviews
Gadgets

The Purism Librem 13 has largely lived up to my goal of having a lightweight productivity laptop with a decent amount of memory (though I’m sad to say that the Firefox build has continued to get larger and slower over time, and linking is sometimes a struggle even with 16 GB of RAM…) while also going the extra mile to protect my privacy and freedoms. The Librem 13 has a few deficiencies in comparison to the ThinkPad line, but they’re mostly in the category of papercuts. At the end of the day it boils down to whether living with a few small annoyances to benefit from the additional privacy features is the right tradeoff for you. For me, so far, it has been, although I certainly hope the Purism folks take feedback like this into account and improve future iterations of the Librem line.

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Also: Software delays, lack of purpose means Microsoft’s “Andromeda” may never arrive

Sailfish in PDAs

Filed under
Gadgets
  • Sailfish for the Gemini PDA lets you ditch Android
  • A slick phone Linux for your pocket PDA? Ooh, don't mind if I do, sir

    Sailfish has become the fourth OS to be officially supported on Planet Computing's pocket computer, the Gemini PDA, and eager beavers can download an image from Planet today.

    Planet has also released an official Debian distro for download. The keyboard-toting device boots into Android, while support for the Ubuntu flavour of Linux is slated.

    Sailfish matters because it's a Linux created primarily with phones and pocket devices in mind – although it will run on static kit like TVs, too. Nokia launched its first Linux tablet in 2005, and the Maemo platform underpinning it morphed into Meego after Intel joined in 2010.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, Mirai and Singapore's Massive Breach

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Mirai botnet hackers [sic] avoid jail time by helping FBI

    The three men, Josiah White, 21, Dalton Norman, 22, and Paras Jha, 22, all from the US, managed to avoid the clink by providing "substantial assistance in other complex cybercrime investigations", according to the US Department of Justice. Who'd have thought young hacker [sic] types would roll over and show their bellies when faced with prison time....

  • A healthcare IT foundation built on gooey clay
    Today, there was a report from the Solicitor General of Singapore about the data breach of the SingHealth systems that happened in July. These systems have been in place for many years. They are almost exclusively running Microsoft Windows along with a mix of other proprietary software including Citrix and Allscript. The article referred to above failed to highlight that the compromised “end-user workstation” was a Windows machine. That is the very crucial information that always gets left out in all of these reports of breaches. I have had the privilege of being part of an IT advisory committee for a local hospital since about 2004 (that committee has disbanded a couple of years ago, btw). [...] Part of the reason is because decision makers (then and now) only have experience in dealing with proprietary vendor solutions. Some of it might be the only ones available and the open source world has not created equivalent or better offerings. But where there are possibly good enough or even superior open source offerings, they would never be considered – “Rather go with the devil I know, than the devil I don’t know. After all, this is only a job. When I leave, it is someone else’s problem.” (Yeah, I am paraphrasing many conversations and not only from the healthcare sector). I recall a project that I was involved with – before being a Red Hatter – to create a solution to create a “computer on wheels” solution to help with blood collection. As part of that solution, there was a need to check the particulars of the patient who the nurse was taking samples from. That patient info was stored on some admission system that did not provide a means for remote, API-based query. The vendor of that system wanted tens of thousands of dollars to just allow the query to happen. Daylight robbery. I worked around it – did screen scrapping to extract the relevant information. Healthcare IT providers look at healthcare systems as a cashcow and want to milk it to the fullest extent possible (the end consumer bears the cost in the end). Add that to the dearth of technical IT skills supporting the healthcare providers, you quickly fall into that vendor lock-in scenario where the healthcare systems are at the total mercy of the proprietary vendors.

Recoll – A Full-Text GUI Search Tool for Linux Systems

We wrote on various search tools recently like in 9 Productivity Tools for Linux That Are Worth Your Attention and FSearch, and readers suggested awesome alternatives. Today, we bring you an app that can find text anywhere in your computer in grand style – Recoll. Recoll is an open-source GUI search utility app with an outstanding full-text search capability. You can use it to search for keywords and file names on Linux distros and Windows. It supports most of the document formats and plugins for text extraction. Read more

today's howtos

Linux Foundation for Sale

  • Open Source Summit EU Registration Deadline, Sept. 22, Register Now to Save $150 [Ed: Microsoft is the "DIAMOND" sponsor of this event, the highest sponsorship level! Linux Foundation, or the Zemlin PAC, seems to be more about Microsoft than about Linux.]
  • Building a Secure Ecosystem for Node.js [Ed: Earlier today the Zemlin PAC did this puff piece for Microsoft (a sponsor)]
  • The Human Side of Digital Transformation: 7 Recommendations and 3 Pitfalls [Ed: New Zemlin PAC-sponsored and self-serving puff piece]
    Not so long ago, business leaders repeatedly asked: “What exactly is digital transformation and what will it do for my business?” Today we’re more likely to hear, “How do we chart a course?” Our answer: the path to digital involves more than selecting a cloud application platform. Instead, digital, at its heart, is a human journey. It’s about cultivating a mindset, processes, organization and culture that encourages constant innovation to meet ever-changing customer expectations and business goals. In this two-part blog series we’ll share seven guidelines for getting digital right. Read on for the first three.