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Gadgets

Soon you will be able to assemble your phones like PCs, courtesy Google’s Ara

Filed under
Android
Google
Gadgets

Recently we have seen a number of ‘game changer’ moves by smartphone companies all looking to start the new trend. The most recent was the launch of the OnePlus One as the “Flagship Killer” which attempted to offer high spec smartphones at a rock-bottom price. In reality the price was simply half the price you would expect to pay for a Samsung Galaxy S5 or LG G3. So although this did change what users (and probably manufacturers) expect a top of the range smartphone to cost it did not really set the smart world alight.

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Pineapple Hacking Device Resembles a Carbon Monoxide Detector

Filed under
Software
OSS
Gadgets

The Pineapple is a small-form-factor device that runs on Linux and is loaded with tools to help enable penetration testers to gain access to the WiFi networks of their targets. The new Mark V device improves on the predecessor Mark IV device by including both the Atheros AR9331 and Realtek RTL8187 wireless chipsets.
Hardware alone isn't what makes the Pineapple really powerful; the newly updated software provides users with enhanced capabilities. With the prior releases of the Pineapple, the open-source Karma tool was one of the primary ways to trick a target into connecting to the Pineapple. In a Karma attack, the Pineapple listens in for WiFi clients that are looking for access points with which they have previously connected. So, for example, if a user has ever connected to an access point named "coffeshop," in a karma attack the Pineapple will claim to be "coffeshop" so the user will connect.

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Moto G Problems From Android 4.4 KitKat Update: Battery Drain, Airplane Mode Problems

Filed under
Android
Gadgets

Way back before the Motorola Moto G wasn't even released yet, the company devised a plan to get ahead of its competitors. Upon release of the Moto G, the phone was equipped with the Android 4.3 Jelly Bean but the OS was quickly amped up to the Android 4.4 Kitkat.

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Palm-sized mini PC projects display, uses IR for touch

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

TouchPico is prepping an Android 4.2 mini-PC that doubles as a pico-projector and approximates touch input via an infrared stylus and camera.

It’s not enough to offer just another straight-ahead pico projector these days. Sprint’s recent, ZTE-built LivePro, for example, doubles as a mobile hotspot and features an embedded display, and Promate’s LumiTab is also a tablet. Now a startup called TouchPico offers a similarly Android-based TouchPico device that adds touch input to projected images.

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Smartphone Shipments Grow as China and Emerging Markets Do Well

Filed under
Android
Gadgets

Judging from the latest global smartphone sales numbers, players like Mozilla who are focused on markets outside the U.S., including emerging markets, may have the wind at their backs. As just one example of why that's true, Samsung and Apple, dropped to their lowest shares of the worldwide smartphone market in years during the second quarter as Chinese smartphone vendors delivered strong growth, market research firm IDC reported.

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Tiny Raspberry Pi-compatible SBC targets wearables

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Hardkernel launched a $30, 60 x 36mm Raspberry-Pi compatible “Odroid-W” wearables oriented SBC, adding eMMC, ADC, RTC, a fuel gauge, and step converters.

Hardkernel’s Odroid project developed the Odroid-W (Odroid-Wearable) for a partner’s Internet of Things prototyping platform, after first considering and dismissing its quad-core Odroid-U3 single board computer. The Odroid-U3, which was rated as the third most popular Linux hacker SBC in our recent survey, used too much power for use as an IoT and wearables platform. The Raspberry Pi was more power efficient, but too large. No doubt, RPi compatibility also had its attractions, as the project ended up building its own Raspberry Pi pseudo-clone implemented on a COM (computer-on-module) style form factor.

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Tiny Linux SBC web-enables DIY IoT modules

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

LittleBits launched a tiny $59 ARM9-based “CloudBit” SBC that adds Internet access to the company’s collection of 60+ electronics modules for DIY projects.

The tiny, 15 x 10 x 5mm CloudBit single board computer adds Internet connectivity and a modest ARM9 brain to LittleBits Electronics’s popular, Lego-like platform, which is billed as an easier, plug-and-play alternative to Arduino for electronics prototyping. The LittleBits modules are available in $99 (10 modules), $149 (14 modules), and $199 (18 modules) kits, and include actuators, sensors, buzzers, dimmers, LEDs, DC motors, and other gizmos. The devices connect to each other in serial-bus fashion via magnets, enabling rapid project brainstorming without the need for soldering, wiring, or programming.

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Android L 4.5 / 5 ‘Lollipop’ Release Date, News, Rumors: Nexus, HTC Will Support Android L; Samsung, Sony, Motorola, LG Support Not Confirmed

Filed under
Android
Gadgets

With the Android L set to roll out in a couple of months times, only two companies are definitely supporting the latest Google OS update.

Google confirmed during I/O 2014 that the the will release the next Android update later this year, and that is is currently code named “Android L.”

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Meet the DragonBox Pyra, the Linux DS equivalent

Filed under
Linux
Gaming
Gadgets

I’m a begrudging Linux user, specifically Ubuntu. It’s the result of being too cheap to buy software like Photoshop and too ethical to just steal it like everybody else. As a result I get to enjoy all the benefits of free software, including the attempts to develop the “perfect” portable console, like the DragonBox Pyra.

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The DragonBox Pyra Moves Closer As OpenPandora Successor

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Michael Mozrek gave a presentation recently about his work as the project lead on the DragonBox Pyra, the slated replacement to the Open Pandora handheld Linux game system.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla Firefox 32 Officially Released

It's been a little over a month since the previous Firefox stable release and the developers have now pushed a new major update to users. This latest iteration of Firefox brings just a few major features for regular users, but it excels in other areas like better HTML 5 support. The official announcement for Mozilla Firefox 32 hasn't been made public just yet, but the mirrors now host the latest stable versions. It will take them a while to post anything official, and some time may go by until this new release hits the repositories, but you now can get to see what has changed. Read more

Time For the GNU/Linux Desktop

M[icrosoft] has deliberately violated the laws of competition in USA and elsewhere repeatedly, systematically and with malice. They are out to get us. At first they got an exclusive deal with IBM to get their foot in the door, piggybacking on IBM’s branding with business, then they demanded exclusive deals with ISVs and manufacturers, then they punished any manufacturer who stepped out of line and installed competing products, then they created an endless chain of incompatible file-format changes and created whole industries based on the existence of overly complex secret protocols and finally forced the world to accept a closed standard as an open standard… That whole burden has served to render IT more expensive to own and to operate and much more fragile than it should be just on technical merits. Read more

5 tips on migrating to open-source software

Open source is not just for Linux. Yes, you'll certainly find a much larger selection of open-source software for the Linux platform, but both Windows and Apple also enjoy a good number of titles. Regardless of what Free Open Source Software (FOSS) you need to use, you might not always find it the most natural evolution -- especially when you've spent the whole of your career using proprietary software. The thing is, a lot of open-source software has matured to the point where it rivals (and sometimes bests) its proprietary counterpart. Read more

A web browser for the Raspberry Pi

As I previously mentioned, Collabora has been working with the Raspberry Pi Foundation on various projects including a web browser optimised for the Raspberry Pi. Since the first beta release we have made huge improvements; now the browser is more responsive, it’s faster, and videos work much better (the first beta could play 640×360 videos at 0.5fps, now we can play 25fps 1280×720 videos smoothly). Some web sites are still a bit slow (if they are heavy on the JavaScript side), but there’s not much we can do for web sites that, even on my laptop with an Intel Core i7, use 100% of one of the cores for more than ten seconds. Read more