Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gadgets

Creating a real GNU/Linux phone os

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

I just want Linux on my phone. I love Android, it has a decent app ecosystem. I like the idea of Ubuntu Touch but I absolutely don't like the design guidelines. The problem is that both operating systems are missing the things from Linux I like. Technically they both run on a version of the Linux kernel but what I want is the GNU userland, Xorg/Wayland, the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard, and my own choice of desktop environment or window manager.

I know quite a lot programming languages enough to make some applications, I dont want to learn 3 new ones for 3 mobile platforms. I don't want to write my app in javascript, java or swift.

Read more

Phones With Linux

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
Gadgets

New Chips Give Linux a Hand in Wearables

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Aside from the Tizen-based Samsung Gear S2, and a dozen or so Android-based Android Wear watches, Linux has been something of a no-show in the smartwatch market. Most lower-end watches skip the overhead of Linux in favor of simpler RTOS-based devices running on MCUs.

Yet Linux got a boost into wearables this week when Qualcomm, whose Snapdragon chips fuel most Android Wear watches, announced a Snapdragon Wear 1100 system-on-chip for lower-end smartwatches and wearables. The 28nm-fabricated SoC is built around a single Cortex-A7 core that can be clocked to 1.2GHz.

Read more

Movidius Fathom — This USB Stick Converts Any Linux Computer Into An A.I. Supercomputer

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

Chip maker Movidius has unveiled “the world’s first embedded neural network accelerator”. Known as the Fathom Neural Compute Stick, this device could be plugged into a Linux device to allow it to perform functions like image recognition, language comprehension, and pattern detection.

Read more

Also: Concurrent Introduces RedHawk Linux for 64-Bit ARM® Processors

Debian Handheld Pre-orders, GNOME Scores RH Servers

Filed under
Debian
Gadgets
-s

From (some of) the folks that brought you Pandora comes new Linux gaming handheld Pyra. Pre-orders are now being taken. The Free Software Foundation filed a comment with the U.S. Copyright Office calling for an end to JavaScript requirements on government websites. Red Hat recently donated two servers to the GNOME project and Nick Heath examined a draft of the Munich Open Source report. Douglas DeMaio posted of Tumbleweed updates and vulnerabilities in ImageMagick have webmasters scrambling.

Read more

DragonBox Pyra

Filed under
Gaming
Gadgets
  • DragonBox Pyra Goes Up For Pre-Order

    It's been a while since last hearing anything about the DragonBox Pyra as an open-source gaming handheld system and successor to OpenPandora...

  • Bitcoin is Now Accepted For DragonBox Pyra Pre-orders

    It is always good to see new merchants accepting Bitcoin payments, as it goes to show businesses want to attract an international clientele. DragonBox, a ship based in Germany, recently started accepting Bitcoin payments for their Pyra computer. A neat little device, which packs quite the punch.

  • DragonBox Pyra pre-orders begin (open Source handheld gaming PC)

    The DragonBox Pyra is a portable computer that looks like a cross between a tiny laptop and a Nintendo DX game console… and it kind of works like a cross between those devices as well. It’s got a 5 inch display, a QWERTY keyboard, the Debian Linux operating system that can handle desktop apps as well as games, and physical gaming buttons.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Filed under
Gadgets

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Debian and Derivatives

  • Glad to be a Mentor of Google Summer Code again!
    While, why I proposed this idea? Plinth is developed by Freedombox which is a Debian based project. The Freedombox is aiming for building a 100% free software self-hosting web server to deploy social applications on small machines. It provides online communication tools respecting user privacy and data ownership, replacing services provided by third-parties that under surveillance. Plinth is the front-end of Freedombox, written in Python.
  • The #newinstretch game: new forensic packages in Debian/stretch
    Debian/stretch AKA Debian 9.0 will include a bunch of packages for people interested in digital forensics. The packages maintained within the Debian Forensics team which are new in the Debian/stretch release as compared to Debian/jessie (and ignoring jessie-backports):
  • Getting ready for Stretch
    I run about 17 servers. Of those about six are very personal and the rest are a small cluster which are used for a single website. (Partly because the code is old and in some ways a bit badly designed, partly because "clustering!", "high availability!", "learning!", "fun!" - seriously I had a lot of fun putting together a fault-tolerant deployment with haproxy, ucarp, etc, etc. If I were paying for it the site would be both retired and static!)
  • Devuan Jessie 1.0.0 stable release (LTS)
    Once again the Veteran Unix Admins salute you! Many of you might remember November 2014 when we announced that we were going to fork Debian. Well, we have done exactly that. It has been a long process, but now over two years later, we proudly present Devuan Jessie 1.0.0 Stable.
  • Parsix GNU/Linux Is Closing Its Doors, All Users Will Be Migrated to Debian 9
    You know we hate to give you guys bad news, but it looks like the Parsix GNU/Linux project is closing its doors in about six months after the release of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system.

OSS Leftovers

Ubuntu-Based Alternatives and Snapcraft 2.30

  • ​How to install Linux Mint on your Windows PC
    I think Linux Mint isn't just a great desktop, it's a great replacement for Windows. With Windows security problems such as WannaCry, people are starting to explore alternatives to Windows. I got a number of requests about switching out from Windows to the latest and best Linux. For me and many other experienced Linux users that's Linux Mint 18.1. You don't need to be a Linux expert to install Mint on a Windows PC. Here's how to do it.
  • Distro watch for Ubuntu lovers: What's ahead in Linux land
    With the death of Unity, Canonical will focus more attention on Ubuntu servers, Ubuntu in the cloud and Ubuntu in the so-called Internet of Things. Even if you give Canonical the benefit of the doubt - that it will continue working on desktop Ubuntu - at the very least, desktop Ubuntu's future looks uncertain. Post Unity, how will the transition to GNOME work? Will existing Unity users be "upgraded" to GNOME with 17.10? Canonical is reportedly plotting out solutions to much of this uncertainty right now, but for users, the uncertainty rules the day.
  • Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.30 Snappy Packaging Tool for Ubuntu Linux OSes
    Canonical's Sergio Schvezov was proud to announce the release and immediate availability of Snapcraft 2.30, a major milestone of the open-source Snappy packaging tool used to package apps in the Snap universal binary format.

An introduction to Linux's EXT4 filesystem

Although written for Linux, the EXT filesystem has its roots in the Minix operating system and the Minix filesystem, which predate Linux by about five years, being first released in 1987. Understanding the EXT4 filesystem is much easier if we look at the history and technical evolution of the EXT filesystem family from its Minix roots. Read more