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Gadgets

How LG Took WebOS from Mobile Phones to TVs in Under a Year

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

When LG acquired the WebOS project from HP early last year, it was a stripped down Linux-based mobile operating system hardly fit to run on any hardware. Then in January, less than a year later, LG debuted its new WebOS smart TVs at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. And until the first WebOS TVs hit retail shelves earlier this month the team was working around the clock for the release.

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Zicom introduces first-of-its-kind Hybrid Mini DVR

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Besides supporting standard algorithms for video and audio encoding and decoding, a Linux operating system is embedded.

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Music streaming hotspot launches on Kickstarter for $30

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Fon has launched a Kickstarter project for a Linux-based “Gramofon” device that streams music from multiple mobile devices, and also acts as a WiFi hotspot.

With 26 days to go, Gramofon has yet to reach the halfway mark in funding toward its ambitious $250,000 Kickstarter goal. Fon plans to ship its first 6,500 units in July no matter what, but if the project is funded, it will expand its distribution, with later delivery dates. The Gramofon is now available for $30 (black) or $40 (white), with prices eventually rising to $50 and $60, respectively.

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Ubuntu 14.04 will power “first commercially available Ubuntu tablets”

Filed under
Ubuntu
Gadgets

Canonical eventually wants to create a single operating system that can be installed across desktops, phones, and tablets, with a different interface presented on each device. That convergence hasn't been completed yet, so with 14.04 (codenamed "Trusty Tahr") there will be separate downloads for the mobile editions. "Full convergence means that the same code for operating systems and applications will be running on all types of devices, from phones to tablets to desktops, and even both smaller and larger devices," Ubuntu Engineering VP Rick Spencer told Ars in an e-mail. "Convergence is still a work in progress, and we will continue to move the code to the desktop as it is ready in each release."

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Is Amazon's Fire TV a dud for gamers?

Filed under
Android
Gadgets

I suspect we're in the very early days of gaming on the Fire TV. Amazon has gotten the Fire TV to market ahead of an Apple TV or Android TV that offers games, and we'll most likely see the game controller and the overall gaming experience get even better in future releases of the Fire TV.

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This is Amazon’s smartphone

Filed under
Android
Gadgets

According to details from multiple sources, Amazon’s first phone will be powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon processor, and it will also include 2GB of RAM. It will run a heavily customized version of Google’s Android operating system similar to the version that powers Amazon’s tablets.

Our sources state that the phone’s display will measure 4.7 inches diagonally, making the handset’s screen a bit smaller than recent flagship offerings from Samsung and HTC. The handset also have comparatively low pixel density, featuring 720p HD resolution compared to 1080p HD resolution on many rival devices.

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Samsung's Android Wear watch and Google-less phone coming this year

Filed under
Android
Gadgets

Samsung's first attempt at putting together an advanced smartwatch based on Android, the Galaxy Gear, met with a very rough reception at the tail end of last year, and the company quickly switched to its own Tizen software for the Gear 2 and Gear 2 Neo. In emailed comments to The Verge, Samsung has confirmed Yoon's timeline of a 2014 release for its new smartwatch and clarified that it will indeed be using Android Wear. Together with the Gear Fit, which runs its own custom software, Samsung will soon be supporting three different operating systems for its wearable devices.

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Linksys launches new router with open source code

Filed under
OSS
Gadgets

Linksys has started shipping a new router, and it’s touting its latest offering as the first consumer-grade Wi-Fi router to provide thorough wireless coverage throughout the home through its four external antennas.

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Firefox OS 2.0 starts emerging from its cocoon

Filed under
Linux
Moz/FF
Gadgets

Firefox OS 2.0 plans include copy and paste support, a new mechanism for launching apps and switching among them, a more useful lock screen, a find-my phone system, and more. Those features will be crucial to the success of the nascent OS, which lags Android and iOS by years but which is critical to Mozilla's continued relevance.

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Huawei Ascend Y530, First Take: Entry-level smartphone with 'simple' Android UI option

Filed under
Android
Gadgets

It isn't easy being an Android smartphone maker these days. Your flagship handsets are scrutinised for cutting-edge features, yet they're criticised if these features seem to be unnecessary, or are unnecessarily complicated.

Ever faster multicore processors are sometimes deemed by reviewers to be faster than needed, with the trade-off between power consumption and responsiveness often cited. Higher-resolution screens can be dismissed, as there comes a point where pixel count goes beyond being a factor in smooth text and graphics rendition. What's a manufacturer to do in the face of such criticism?

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More in Tux Machines

Raspberry Pi based computer offers Real-Time Ethernet

Hilscher is prepping a rugged “netPI” computer that combines a Raspberry Pi 3 with its “netHAT 52-RTE” RPi add-on featuring dual Real-Time Ethernet ports. German Real-Time Ethernet experts Hilscher will soon launch a Raspberry Pi 3-based industrial computer with Real-Time Ethernet support. Hilscher has yet to formally announce the ruggedized netPI computer, but the board was demonstrated at the recent Embedded World show, and was revealed in a Mar. 27 Element14 Community blog by Shabaz. The system can be used as a Real-Time Ethernet gateway or controller, and it supports add-ons such as sensors or actuators to enable additional applications, writes Shabaz. Read more

GNOME Migration and Slideshow

  • The Linux Migration: Corporate Collaboration, Part 2
    Note that a number of folks have suggested alternative calendar applications. I’ve rejected these so far because I don’t think they’ll fit into my workflow or my environment, but they may work for others. Some of the applications I’ve seen suggested include Rainlendar, Calcurse, or KOrganizer. Some of these applications address some of the shortcomings of GNOME Calendar, but none of them address all the major issues I’ve outlined here (based on my testing thus far).
  • GNOME 3.24 Provides Users With More Pleasing Linux Desktop Experience

Dowry to Linux Foundation From NSA Ally

  • AT&T takes up membership in the Linux Foundation, furthers open source efforts
    AT&T has become a Platinum member in the Linux Foundation, a move that reflects the telco’s ongoing effort to implement open source and open networks not only in its own networks but also to drive broader industry collaboration. One example of this is AT&T's Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) architecture. In February, AT&T contributed several million lines of ECOMP code to The Linux Foundation, as well as the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project based on production-ready code from AT&T and OPEN-O contributors.
  • AT&T Joins The Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member
  • AT&T Joins The Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit advancing professional open source management for mass collaboration, today announced that AT&T has become a Platinum member. This follows news of the company’s contribution of several million lines of ECOMP code to The Linux Foundation, as well as the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project based on production-ready code from AT&T and OPEN-O contributors.

GNU/Linux on Servers: VisionMobile Report, Cilium, Microservices, and Kubernetes

  • VisionMobile Report Lays Out Developer Salaries by Skill, Software Sector, and Location
    In 2017, that means skilled cloud and backend developers, as well as those who work in emerging technologies including Internet of Things (IoT), machine learning and augmented/virtual reality (AR/VR) can make more money -- tens or sometimes hundreds of times more -- than frontend web and mobile developers whose skills have become more commoditized. “In Western Europe, for example, the median backend developer earns 12% more than the median web developer; a machine learning developer makes 28% more,” according to the report.
  • Cilium leverages Linux kernel for advanced container networking
    Networking has always been one of the most persistent headaches when working with containers. Even Kubernetes—fast becoming the technology of choice for container orchestration—has limitations in how it implements networking. Tricky stuff like network security is, well, even trickier. Now an open source project named Cilium, which is partly sponsored by Google, is attempting to provide a new networking methodology for containers based on technology used in the Linux kernel. Its goal is to give containers better network security and a simpler model for networking.
  • Modules vs. microservices
    Much has been said about moving from monoliths to microservices. Besides rolling off the tongue nicely, it also seems like a no-brainer to chop up a monolith into microservices. But is this approach really the best choice for your organization? It’s true that there are many drawbacks to maintaining a messy monolithic application. But there is a compelling alternative which is often overlooked: modular application development. In this article, we'll explore what this alternative entails and show how it relates to building microservices.
  • What Is Kubernetes?
    Kubernetes is open source software for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. The project is governed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, which is hosted by The Linux Foundation. And it’s quickly becoming the Linux of the cloud, says Jim Zemlin, executive director of The Linux Foundation. Running a container on a laptop is relatively simple. But connecting containers across multiple hosts, scaling them when needed, deploying applications without downtime, and service discovery among several aspects, are really hard challenges. Kubernetes addresses those challenges with a set of primitives and a powerful API.