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Gadgets

Open Source Remote Control lets you pilot just about any drone

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OSS
Gadgets

Drones and other remotely piloted vehicles are inherently limited by their controls; you frequently have to switch controllers when you switch vehicles, and you can usually forget about customization. You might not have to worry if the Open Source Remote Control (OSRC) project gets off the ground, however. The long-in-development peripheral uses a mix of modular hardware and Linux-based software that lets you steer just about any unmanned machine. On top of a programmable interface, you can swap in new wireless modules and shoulder switches to either accommodate new drones or improve existing controls. You can also attach a 4.8-inch touchscreen module (typically for a first-person view), use cellular networks or even share one vehicle between multiple operators -- handy if you're at a flying club or shooting a movie.

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Is the Tizen Samsung Z Alive and running Tizen 2.3 SM-Z910F ? #TDS14SH

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

At the Tizen Developer Summit 2014 Shanghai, Samsung were showing off the Gear S, and also the Samsung Z Smartphone. Taking a further glimpse at the settings we can see that it is listed as running Tizen 2.3, which recently saw the release of the Tizen 2.3 Beta SDK. As a recap, the Samsung Z was the Tizen flagship Smartphone that Samsung were due to release at the Tizen developer summit in Russia, but cancelled the launch with only 48 hours to spare.

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Android Wear gets GPS support, offline music in first major update

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Android
Gadgets

Google promised that it would consistently improve Android Wear with a number of updates, and now the first major update is here. Announced today in a blog post, the update unlocks some key fitness functionality. It now supports watches with built-in GPS sensors, providing new tools to track your distance and speed independent of your phone. Additionally, with the new software, you'll be able to pair Bluetooth headphones, and offline music playback will also be enabled. And, of course, we're sure the Android Wear team has squashed some bugs along the way.

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Stick computer runs Android on quad-core Atom

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Android
Gadgets

Shenzhen Apec Electronics has launched a $110, Android stick computer built around a quad-core Intel Atom Z3735 SoC with 1-2GB of RAM and 16-32GB storage.

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Sony Z1 and Z2 added to Xperia open-source project with unified kernels

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Android
Linux
Gadgets

The Xperia Z1 and Xperia Z2 are now a part of Sony's open source efforts, and unifies them with a common kernel based on the Qualcomm MSM8974 platform. This won't mean much for everyday users, since applying the software to either device means you won't be able to take pictures or make phone calls, but it will make life easier for folks who tinker with custom ROMs.

The kernel unification means developers will be able to cook something up for both devices at once, rather than needing separate ROMs for each. This is a great start, but there are plenty of Z variant models that could benefit from this AOSP treatment as well.

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Hands-on with iRobot's Android-based robot controller: pictures

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Android
Gadgets

iRobot on Thursday unveiled a new controller for its unmanned bomb disposal and discovery robots, an app that runs on every Android tablet.

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Pocket-sized mobile touchscreen web server runs Tizen

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Linux
Gadgets

A mobile personal web server called “The Egg” runs Tizen on an Intel Atom and features a 12-hour battery, a 2.4-inch touchscreen, and up to 256GB of storage.

Arizona-based startup Eggcyte has taken to Kickstarter to push a more private alternative to public cloud storage and social networking sites. The Egg is available in packages starting at $199 with 64GB through Nov. 6, with devices shipping in July 2015. The Egg is billed as a personal web server, and a way to cut the cord on social networking sites that sell information based on your data.

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Samsung Gear 2 Smartwatch gets cloned in China, Smartwatch LX36

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Linux
Gadgets

The Tizen Samsung Gear 2 has certainly been out for a while now, but it seems that it has more admirers than we initially thought. The Gear 2 is so good that they have actually started copying it in China, model Smartwatch LX36.

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Tizen Smartphone powers a Robot using WiFi and NFC

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Linux
Gadgets

Using input device / control events in the Tizen Linux they were able to control mouse and keyboard events. You can charge the Tizen phone when it is place inside the robots head, and notifications messages are displayed in the robots LCD screen. You can also perform file transfers between devices and even use the robot as a media output device.

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Slide Show: 11 Smart Eyewear Devices Running Android or Linux

Filed under
Android
Linux
Gadgets

Google Glass wasn't the first eyewear computer, but it achieved several technological breakthroughs, especially in its sleek, lightweight construction. The much maligned device has spawned a growing industry of head-mounted smart eyegear. Our slide show of 11 Android and Linux eyewear devices includes simple Bluetooth accessories for notifications, full-fledged industrial headgear, sports gear for bikers and skiiers, and even a motorcycle helmet (click Gallery link below).

Like Glass, eight of the 10 other devices listed in our slide show are based on Android, while two -- Laforge's ICIS and Tobii Glasses 2 -- use embedded Linux. Almost all the devices are open for pre-orders at the very least, and most are shipping, although sometimes only in beta form. Several are OEM-focused devices. Glass only recently became publicly available for $1,500, and sales are still controlled by Google, with restrictions in terms of age (18+) and a requirement that you live in the US or UK.

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More in Tux Machines

Open source SDR SBC runs Snappy Ubuntu on Cyclone V

The open source, $299 “LimeSDR” board runs Snappy Ubuntu Core on a Cyclone V, and supports user-defined radios ranging from ZigBee to LTE. UK-based Lime Microsystems, which develops field programmable RF (FPRF) transceivers for wireless broadband systems, has launched an open source software defined radio (SDR) board on CrowdSupply. Like other Linux-based SDR systems we’ve seen, the LimeSDR uses an FPGA to help orchestrate wireless communications that can be tuned, manipulated, and reconfigured to different wireless standards via software. Read more

Critical Infrastructure Goes Open Source

The electrical grid, water, roads and bridges—the infrastructure we take for granted—is seldom noticed until it's unavailable. The burgeoning open source software movement is taking steps to help rebuild crumbling U.S. civil infrastructure while capitalizing on expansion in emerging markets by providing software building blocks to help develop interoperable and secure transportation, electric power, oil and gas as well as the healthcare infrastructure. Under a program launched in April called the Civil Infrastructure Platform, the Linux Foundation said the initiative would provide "an open source base layer of industrial grade software to enable the use and implementation of software building blocks for civil infrastructure." Read more

Where have all the MacBooks gone at Linux conferences?

In past years, the vast ocean of Apple logos really undercut any statement of “Linux is great.” People would, inevitably, retort with, “Then why are all the 'Linux People' using Macs?” Admittedly, that was a great point and has been a source of shame for many of us for a very long time. But now things are different. The Apple logos are (mostly) gone from Linux conferences. This may be an unscientific observation from one person attending a few conferences in North America. Regardless, it's a great feeling. Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu 16.04 to-do list
    UBUNTU 16.04 or Xenial Xerus, the latest upgrade of the popular Linux distribution, became available as a free download last month, and early reviews have been favorable. Instead of upgrading my existing Ubuntu 15.10 system, this time I opted for a fresh install. I also decided to give the improved Unity 7 desktop a go, instead of installing my preferred alternative XFCE. The installation process was trouble-free, but because I started from scratch, I had quite a bit to add and tweak after the OS itself was installed.
  • Ubuntu Founder Pledges No Back Doors in Linux
    VIDEO: Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical and Ubuntu, discusses what might be coming in Ubuntu 16.10 later this year and why security is something he will never compromise. Ubuntu developers are gathering this week for the Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS), which runs from May 3-5, to discuss development plans for the upcoming Ubuntu 16.10 Linux distribution release, code-named "Yakkety Yak."
  • Ubuntu & Other Ubuntu Spins Look At Making Room To Grow
    With Ubuntu's install images continuing to be oversized with pushing 1.4GB on recent releases, Ubuntu developer Steve Langasek has raised the new limit for Ubuntu desktop images to 2GB. Other Ubuntu flavors are also following in this move. Langasek has raised the size limit for images now to 2GB for being able to accomodate the current oversized images plus still having room to grow.
  • Ubuntu’s Snap packages aren’t yet as secure as Canonical’s marketing claims
    Canonical has been talking up Snaps, a new type of package format featured in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. “Users can install a snap without having to worry whether it will have an impact on their other apps or their system,” reads Canonical’s announcement. But this isn’t true, as prominent free software developer Matthew Garrett recently pointed out.