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DragonBox Pyra

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Gaming
Gadgets
  • DragonBox Pyra Goes Up For Pre-Order

    It's been a while since last hearing anything about the DragonBox Pyra as an open-source gaming handheld system and successor to OpenPandora...

  • Bitcoin is Now Accepted For DragonBox Pyra Pre-orders

    It is always good to see new merchants accepting Bitcoin payments, as it goes to show businesses want to attract an international clientele. DragonBox, a ship based in Germany, recently started accepting Bitcoin payments for their Pyra computer. A neat little device, which packs quite the punch.

  • DragonBox Pyra pre-orders begin (open Source handheld gaming PC)

    The DragonBox Pyra is a portable computer that looks like a cross between a tiny laptop and a Nintendo DX game console… and it kind of works like a cross between those devices as well. It’s got a 5 inch display, a QWERTY keyboard, the Debian Linux operating system that can handle desktop apps as well as games, and physical gaming buttons.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

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Gadgets

Linux Devices

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Linux
Gadgets

This Android smartphone and barcode reader comes in a 10-oz. package

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Android
Gadgets

Rugged computer maker Janam Technologies on Wednesday announced the XT2, a 10-oz. rugged device with a 5-in. touchscreen that runs Android 5.0 (Lollipop).

The device could be called a rugged smartphone, since it comes with many smartphone features, including voice. It supports GSM and GPRS radio signals for voice, as well as 4G LTE for data -- with a Chrome browser. But Janam also added in a Zebra barcode-scanning feature, the ability to withstand 5-foot drops and immersion in up to three feet of water.

Instead of referring to it as a smartphone, Janam instead calls the XT2 a rugged touch computer and claims it is the lightest and most rugged in its class. Janam CEO Harry Lerner said it is "as sleek as a smartphone … with the most advanced technologies to meet the diverse needs of virtually any mobile worker."

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Linux Handheld Computer ‘Pyra’ — First Prototype Of Open Source Device Is Here

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Linux
Gadgets

Open Pandora’s successor, the Pyra, now has a working prototype. The makers of this Linux-powered handheld computer are looking to make it better on the precision front and working to launch it in the market later this year. Know about the device here and watch the demonstration video.

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Video: DragonBox Pyra open source handheld game console prototype

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Linux
Gadgets

The developers of the DragonBox Pyra hope to deliver a handheld gaming device this year that runs open source, Linux-based software. Pre-orders opened last year, although the final price (and ship date) haven’t been set yet.

But the final design seems to be coming together. Team leader “Evil Dragon” has posted a video showing an early prototype of a pretty functional-looking DragonBox Pyra.

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Sony Brings Support for Open Xperia Devices in Linux Kernel

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Gadgets

Sony is trying to convince the community that their open Xperia devices can be used in a number of interesting ways, and they are adding support for them in the mainline Linux kernel.

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Ubuntu Phones

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Ubuntu
Gadgets

AsteroidOS and Ocean Devices

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Linux
Gadgets

Why Linux-powered “World’s Safest Drone” Fleye Is Better Than Google Glass?

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Linux
Gadgets

Fleye is a unique drone with all its moving parts shielded, thus, making it safer and robust in case it hits something or someone, kudos to the “ducted fan UAV” concept, which used in larger industrial/defense drones. It is exactly the same size and weight as a soccer ball. It is easily controllable via a smartphone and is compatible with iOS and Android. It comes with options of flying camera mode or in case you prefer manual control, you can go for using a virtual touch- gamepad or Bluetooth game controller.

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pfSense 2.3 Open-Source BSD Firewall Gets Patch That Fixes NTP Security Issues

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