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Linux Foundation and the US Military

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OSS
  • Darpa, Linux Foundation create open software initiative to accelerate US 5G stack

    The Linux Foundation said it entered a collaboration agreement with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa) to create open source software. Darpa and the LF will create a broad collaboration umbrella that allows US government projects, their ecosystem and the open-source community to participate in accelerating innovation and security in the areas of 5G, edge, AI, standards, programmability and IoT, among other technologies.

  • Linux Foundation, DARPA collaborate on open source for 5G | FierceWireless

    The Linux Foundation has signed an agreement with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to establish an open source project for the U.S. government.

    The agreement calls for the Linux Foundation and DARPA to work together in the areas of 5G, edge, artificial intelligence, standards, programmability and IoT, among other technologies.

  • DARPA, Linux Foundation Partner to Advance 5G - Nextgov

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is partnering with a major technology consortium to establish an open-source software development collaboration ecosystem to advance emerging technologies such as 5G, according to a Wednesday press release.

    The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit organization that hosts open-source efforts including Kubernetes and the O-RAN Alliance’s software community, signed a cooperative research and development agreement, or CRADA, with DARPA to create a “broad collaboration umbrella” called US Government Open Programmable and Secure, or US GOV OPS. DARPA’s Open Programmable Secure 5G, or OPS-5G, effort will be the first project included under the umbrella, according to the release.

  • DARPA, Linux Foundation team for government 5G | Light Reading

    The Linux Foundation (LF), the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it has signed a collaboration agreement with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to create open source software that accelerates United States government technology research and development innovation.

    Under the agreement, DARPA and the LF will create a broad collaboration umbrella (US Government Open Programmable Secure (US GOV OPS) that allows United States Government projects, their ecosystem, and open community to participate in accelerating innovation and security in the areas of 5G, Edge, AI, Standards, Programmability, and IOT among other technologies. The project formation encourages ecosystem players to support US Government initiatives to create the latest in technology software.

Python Programming

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  • Which is better, Java or Python? And how?

    Blogs over the internet that are showcasing the comparison between Python and Java. But no one is giving a solid reason for “is python or java easier.” We all know that nowadays Python is competing with almost every programming language.

    Even it is also competing with the most robust programming language in the world. Yes, you are right, it is Java. Java is one of the best programming languages to create desktop applications. But it is also used in the field of data science. Therefore both of these programming languages are competing with each other in various industries. Before we dig into the comparison, let’s have a look at the overview of both of these languages.

  • Async Views in Django 3.1

    Writing asynchronous code gives you the ability to speed up your application with little effort. With Django 3.1 finally supporting async views, middleware, and tests, now's a great time to get them under your belt.

    This post looks at how to get started with Django's new asynchronous views.

  • PyBites: How to Run External Python Libraries in AWS Cloud

    AWS Lambda is awesome, but sometimes it can be hard to get external libraries working in this serverless environment.

    No worries, we learned a lesson or two which I will share in this article.

  • Taking Another Look at Plotly

    I’ve written quite a bit about visualization in python - partially because the landscape is always evolving. Plotly stands out as one of the tools that has undergone a significant amount of change since my first post in 2015. If you have not looked at using Plotly for python data visualization lately, you might want to take it for a spin. This article will discuss some of the most recent changes with Plotly, what the benefits are and why Plotly is worth considering for your data visualization needs.

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 11 : Wrapping up!
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: GSoC: Week 12: Scanning docker
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Blog #6 (9th Aug - 16th Aug)

Can You Use FreeBSD for a Developer Machine in 2020?

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BSD

I’ve been considering moving my blog back to a FreeBSD web server. I’d hosted it that way for years and recently switched it to a Linux machine so I could make Octopress work properly. It uses some old, outdated Ruby gems, and it just seemed easier.

But with a new redesign coming and a new Hugo back-end, I’ll be bringing my hosting machine back to FreeBSD.

I recently read FreeBSD is an amazing operating system, which got me thinking:

Can FreeBSD be a viable desktop operating system for developers in 2020?

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Programming/Development: Minicoin, GNU Gengetop and Python

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  • Building and testing on multiple platforms – introducing minicoin

    While working with large-scale (thousands of hosts), distributed (globally) systems, one of my favourite, albeit somewhat gruesome, metaphors was that of “servers as cattle” vs “servers as pets”. Pet-servers are those we groom manually, we keep them alive, and we give them nice names by which to remember and call (ie ssh into) them. However, once you are dealing with hundreds of machines, manually managing their configuration is no longer an option. And once you have thousands of machines, something will break all the time, and you need to be able to provision new machines quickly, and automatically, without having to manually follow a list of complicated instructions.

    When working with such systems, we use configuration management systems such as CFEngine, Chef, Puppet, or Ansible, to automate the provisioning and configuration of machines. When working in the cloud, the entire machine definition becomes “infrastructure as code”. With these tools, servers become cattle which – so the rather unvegetarian idea – is simply “taken behind the barn and shot” when it doesn’t behave like it should. We can simply bring a new machine, or an entire environment, up by running the code that defines it. We can use the same code to bring production, development, and testing environments up, and we can look at the code to see exactly what the differences between those environments are. The tooling in this space is fairly complex, but even so there is little focus on developers writing native code targeting multiple platforms.

    For us as developers, the machine we write our code on is most likely a pet. Our primary workstation dying is the stuff for nightmares, and setting up a new machine will probably keep us busy for many days. But this amount of love and care is perhaps not required for those machines that we only need for checking whether our code builds and runs correctly. We don’t need our test machines to be around for a long time, and we want to know exactly how they are set up so that we can compare things. Applying the concepts from cloud computing and systems engineering to this problem lead me (back) to Vagrant, which is a popular tool to manage virtual machines locally and to share development environments.

  • GNU Gengetopt - News: 2.23 released

    New version (2.23) was released. Main changes were in build system, so please report any issues you notice.

  • Abolishing SyntaxError: invalid syntax ...

    Do you remember when you first started programming (possibly with Python) and encountered an error message that completely baffled you? For some reason, perhaps because you were required to complete a formal course or because you were naturally persistent, you didn't let such messages discourage you entirely and you persevered. And now, whenever you see such cryptic error messages, you can almost immediately decipher them and figure out what causes them and fix the problem.

  • Sending email with EZGmail and Python
  • Creating and Importing Modules in Python

Programming/Development: GNU Releases, Bash, Python and JavaScript

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GNU

Programming: VIM, Python, Knative, Glibc and GCC

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Learn Linux Kernel Device Drivers With Linux Foundation Instructor Bill Kerr

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Linux

Bill Kerr has taught Linux Foundation courses in Linux Kernel internals, debugging, device drivers and application development for many years. He helped write the original Linux Foundation Training course materials and has been working with UNIX kernels for 35 years.

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8 Ways to Write a Better Linux SysAdmin Job Posting

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GNU
Linux

Linux system administrators are in high demand these days and many hiring managers say they're having a hard time finding talent to fill their open positions. It's critical, then, for companies seeking skilled admins to hone their recruiting process in order to stay competitive – and this starts with writing an effective job posting.

Unfortunately, many companies aren't hitting the mark. Job postings for sysadmin positions are largely similar; they’re boring and generic, according to New York City-based recruiter Steve Levy.

Read more

Sourceforge Hijacks the Nmap Sourceforge Account

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Development

Hi Folks! You may have already read the recent news about Sourceforge.net
hijacking the GIMP project account to distribute adware/malware.
Previously GIMP used this Sourceforge account to distribute their Windows
installer, but they quit after Sourceforge started tricking users with fake
download buttons which lead to malware rather than GIMP. Then Sourceforge
took over GIMP's account and began distributing a trojan installer which
tries to trick users into installing various malware and adware before
actually installing GIMP.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

It’s time to boycott AWS

I woke up this morning not planning to write anything on this blog, much less anything about AWS. But then, as I was eating breakfast, I read a horrifying story in Mother Jones about how an AWS employee was treated as he did his best to cope with his wife’s terminal cancer. In the free software community, Amazon (more specifically AWS) has been criticized for years for taking a largely exploitative position concerning FOSS projects. These conversations frequently result in proposals to use licensing as a weapon against AWS. In general, I believe that it would be difficult to target AWS with licensing, as statutory licenses must be fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory. But the issue of exploitation remains: AWS takes from the commons of FOSS projects and productizes that work, frequently without giving anything back. They are, of course, allowed to do this, but at the same time, in doing so, they have frequently undercut the efforts of developers to monetize the labor involved in software maintenance, which leads to projects adopting licenses like SSPL and Commons Clause, which are significantly problematic for the commons. Read more

Today in Techrights

Games: Kathy Rain: Director's Cut, Megaquarium: Architect's Collection, Horizon Chase Turbo, and More

  • The '90s mystery adventure Kathy Rain: Director's Cut is out now | GamingOnLinux

    Kathy Rain: Director's Cut is the definitive edition of the popular point and click mystery adventure from Clifftop Games and Raw Fury. It's out now and it comes with native Linux support. Originally released in May 2016 where is gathered only a modest attention, but won over fans of the genre over time thanks to its compelling story, excellent voice acting, and clever puzzles. Kathy Rain eventually found its audience, achieving over 1.2 million users on Steam alone. The original wasn't supported on Linux but this expanded and improved edition of it is.

  • Megaquarium: Architect's Collection expansion announced for November 11 | GamingOnLinux

    Megaquarium: Architect's Collection is the next expansion for the great aquarium building game from developer Twice Circled and it's ready to release on November 11. This is the second expansion pack for Megaquarium. The first, Freshwater Frenzy, launched in 2020 and gave players freshwater habitats, the ability to develop hybrids, new campaigns and more. With Megaquarium: Architect's Collection you get to focus a bit more on spaces outside of tanks with new architectural features such as bridges, archways, tunnels and more and of course it comes with some new creatures too.

  • Horizon Chase Turbo gets a DLC dedicated to the life of Ayrton Senna | GamingOnLinux

    Horizon Chase Turbo is a popular and well-reviewed retro arcade racer and the developer just released a DLC dedicated to the legend that is Ayrton Senna who died in 1994. Senna, hailed as one of the greatest F1 racers of all time, sadly died in an accident during the San Marino Grand Prix when colliding with a wall on a corner. For a first time in Horizon Chase Turbo, this new expansion gives you the ability to race in first-person. The aptly named Senna Forever DLC brings with it a new 5 chapter single-player career mode to race through.

  • Nintendo Switch emulator yuzu has a new Resolution Scaler, AMD FidelityFX Super Resolution

    yuzu, the free and open source Nintendo Switch emulator has advanced once again with the introduction of a brand new Resolution Scaler enabling you to play games at much higher resolutions. Now available in their Early Access builds, it will roll out for all users once it's properly ready for the public.

  • New Feature Release - Resolution Scaler

    Hey there, yuz-ers! For those of you eager to go beyond the limits of Switch hardware and experience the full potential of Switch games, the wait has finally ended. Our most requested and anticipated feature — the Resolution Scaler — is finally here!

  • Fantastic roguelike Caves of Qud gets more accessible with new game modes, new regions | GamingOnLinux

    Caves of Qud is a roguelike we've been writing about for years now and it continues to be one of the best modern iterations on the classic gameplay style. A huge new stable update just went out making it better than ever, for all types of players. Some of the big changes have been available in a Beta on Steam for a while but now all players get it. [...] Outside of that there's the two new late-game regions, a new two-tiered settlement with many new NPCs, two new factions, a new side-quest, the Rainbow Wood was expanded and is now more dynamic, there's new plans, new plant-like animals, tons of new items and the list just goes on forever.

  • Prepare your wallet for the next confirmed Steam Sale dates | GamingOnLinux

    You may want to set aside some money and fill up that Steam Wishlist, as the next couple of big sale events now have their dates confirmed.

  • How to Install and Play War Thunder on Ubuntu

    Ubuntu has become one of the most suited Linux-based distributions for gaming. This is because of the large community support and updates. It offers compatibility for a majority of gaming titles available on Steam. One of the popular free-to-play games on Steam is War Thunder. War Thunder brings a twist to the multiplayer shooter genre by providing advanced ground and aerial combat (in the form of tanks and airplanes). War Thunder provides a wide range of tanks and airplanes to choose from and customization options to improve the vehicle stats further. This ensures that no two vehicles are the same, and the combat experience feels fresh in every match. With features like these, we can see why you’d like to play War Thunder. This guide will cover how you can install War Thunder using Steam. Although there are other methods, you can use to proceed with the installation, working with Steam is the simplest as it gets rid of the process of working with packages.

KDE Plasma 5.23.2 Released with NVIDIA GBM Support, More Bug Fixes

KDE Plasma 5.23.2 comes only a week after KDE Plasma 5.23.1 and introduces a big feature for NVIDIA GPU users, namely support for the GBM backend of the proprietary NVIDIA graphics driver. Over time, this should improve the Plasma experience for NVIDIA users in many ways. Read more