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Debian

Review: Tails 4.11

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Reviews
Debian

The Amnesic Incognito Live System (better known as Tails) is a Debian-based live DVD/USB with the goal of providing complete Internet anonymity for the user. The distribution ships with several Internet applications, including web browser, IRC client, mail client and instant messenger. The distribution transfers Internet traffic through the Tor network to hide its origin.

One of the project's latest releases was version 4.11. (At the time of writing 4.12 is about to be published, though without any significant new features.) Lately the project has mostly focused on bug fixes and minor tweaks, though Tails 4.11 introduces the option of persistent storage for some of the distribution's settings and data. Persistent storage is not enabled by default, but can be set up using tools included on the live media.

Tails is available for 64-bit (x86_64) computers and its live media is approximately 1.2GB in size. The live media can be written to a DVD or USB thumb drive. There are separate files provided depending on whether we want to write the distribution to DVD or USB media, however I tested and confirmed the DVD image can be written to, and run from, a USB thumb drive if need be.

Early impressions

Booting from the Tails media brings up a welcome screen. This graphical interface offers to either start the desktop session or shutdown the operating system. On this welcome screen we can click buttons to bring up settings options that allow us to select our keyboard layout, language, and locale formats. At the bottom of the welcome window is a button which opens additional settings. These extra settings are security related and allow us to assign a password to the administrator account, enable/disable MAC address spoofing, set whether to allow the "Unsafe Browser" to run, and how to connect to the Tor network or to disable networking entirely.

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OSMC's October update is here with Debian Buster and Kodi 18.8

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Debian

As you may have noticed, we didn't release an OSMC update for a while. After a lot of hard work, OSMC's October update is now here featuring Debian 10, codename "Buster" and Kodi 18.8. This yields a number of improvements and is one of our most significant OSMC updates yet. It featurues:

- Better performance
- A larger number of software packages to choose from
- More up to date software packages to choose from

We'd like to thank everyone involved with testing and developing this update.

We continue to work on our improved video stack for Vero 4K and Vero 4K + which brings HDR10+ and 3D MVC support. We also continue to work on Raspberry Pi 4 support and we will shortly make some kernel 5.x test builds available in our forums for currently supported Pi models so we can use a unified kernel code base for all models.

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Also Debian: [sparkylinux] Boostnote

NanoPi R2S & NanoPi NEO3 tested with Armbian – Thermal test, Ethernet and USB performance

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
Debian
Ubuntu

In the first part of the review of NanoPi NEO3 and Nano R2S I checked out the hardware, with both tiny gateways powered by a Rockchip RK3328 processor but a different features as NEO3 includes a Gigabit Ethernet port and a USB 3.0 port, while R2S comes with dual Gigabit Ethernet ports and a USB 2.0 port.

I’ve now had time to test both gateways using Armbian 20.08.1 release based on Ubuntu 20.04 Focal. Note that while NanoPi R2S is officially supported by Armbian, NanoPi NEO3 images are currently tagged as “suitable for testing“. Having that said I did not come across any specific issues on NEO3, and it may mostly mean it’s easier to get support on the forums with R2S.

[...]

That means Ubuntu 20.04 with Linux 5.8.6, but since Armbian is always updated, I ended the review with Linux 5.8.15. I’ll focus the review on thermal testing, as well as Ethernet and USB performance.

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Google Coral Dev Board mini SBC is now available for $100

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Linux
Google
Hardware
Debian

Google Coral SBC was the first development board with Google Edge TPU. The AI accelerator was combined with an NXP i.MX 8M quad-core Arm Cortex-A53 processor and 1GB RAM to provide an all-in-all AI edge computing platform. It launched for $175, and now still retails for $160 which may not be affordable to students and hobbyists.

[...]

The board runs Debian based Mendel Linux distribution developed by Google for Coral boards and supports TensorFlow Lite and AutoML Vision Edge with the latter enabling “fast, high-accuracy custom image classification models”.

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Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Janitor: How to Contribute Lintian-Brush Fixers

    The Debian Janitor is an automated system that commits fixes for (minor) issues in Debian packages that can be fixed by software. It gradually started proposing merges in early December. The first set of changes sent out ran lintian-brush on sid packages maintained in Git. This post is part of a series about the progress of the Janitor.

  • Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, September 2020

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Ubuntu Blog: Introducing Ubuntu support for Amazon EKS 1.18

    Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS) is a fully automated Kubernetes cluster service on Amazon Web Services (AWS). Ubuntu is a popular and proven operating system for both virtual machine and containerized cloud computing. Canonical (the creator and primary maintainer of Ubuntu) is an Amazon partner and works with the EKS team to provide an optimized Ubuntu Amazon Machine Image (AMI) for running Kubernetes on AWS. EKS-optimized Ubuntu AMIs give you the familiarity and consistency of using Ubuntu, optimized for performance and security on EKS clusters.

    Ubuntu optimized AMIs for Amazon EKS and Kubernetes versions 1.17 and 1.18 are now available. These images combine the Ubuntu OS with Canonical’s distribution of upstream Kubernetes that automates K8s deployment and operations. In addition to using a slimmed-down, minimal image these images take advantage of a custom kernel that is jointly developed with AWS.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 Users Can Upgrade to Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Yes, Finally)

    If you’re on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and you’ve been waiting for the prompt that lets you upgrade to Ubuntu 20.04 LTS you can relax: it’s rolling out

    Confused? I imagine a lot of people reading this post will be. So I’ll recap: an Ubuntu LTS to LTS upgrade is only “officially” possible once the first point release to the latest LTS has gone live.

    But until it does you can’t upgrade one LTS to the new LTS., not without diving into the command line.

    Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS was released in July. In theory, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS users should’ve started to see the “there’s a newer version of Ubuntu” upgrade prompt box on their desktops from this date onwards.

How to try out Debian 11 early

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Debian

Unfortunately, Debian 11 is not yet available for download on the official Debian website. The reason for this is that Debian 10 is currently stable, and 11 is not yet marked stable. So, to try out Debian 11, you must first install Debian 10.

There are a few ways to get Debian 10 working, but the best way to go is with the Debian 10 net installer, as it’s only a few megabytes in size and will allow you to download and install the latest Debian 10 packages.

To get Debian 10 set up, you must first create a live USB installer. To start, download the latest Etcher, install it, and launch it. Then, download the Debian 10 net installer ISO to your computer.

Once the Etcher app is installed and the net installer ISO is downloaded to your computer, launch Etcher, and use the app to flash the Debian 10 net installer ISO to USB.

After flashing the Debian 10 net installer ISO to USB, reboot your computer and load into the BIOS. Inside of the BIOS, configure it to boot from USB. Doing so will load up the Debian 10 installer.

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Salsa CI now includes i386 build support

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Development
Debian

Salsa CI aims at improving the Debian packaging lifecycle by delivering Continuous Integration fully compatible with Debian packaging. The main Salsa CI's project is the pipeline, that builds packages and run different tests after every git push to Salsa. The pipeline makes it possible to have a quick and early feedback about any issues the new changes may have created or solved, without the need to upload to the archive.

All of the pipeline jobs run on amd64 architecture, but the Salsa CI Team has recently added support to build packages also on i386 architecture. This work started during the Salsa CI Sprint at DebConf20 after the "Where is Salsa CI right now" talk, and required different changes at the core of pipeline to make it possible.

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The 10 Best Debian Based Linux Distributions for Beginners Like Me

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Linux
Debian

Debian is called the mother of Linux distributions. When I was new to Linux, I always wondered why this “not-so-good-looking” distro is so popular inside the Linux developers community! Especially when there are a lot of modern distributions that are easy to use and have beautiful UIs. Later on, I found out the power of Debian. You will be surprised to know that almost all the popular consumer-level distros are based on Debian. It is so stable and feature-rich that the developers find it easy to build their distros based on Debian rather than building from scratch. However, for some obvious reasons, I get many questions about the best Debian based Linux distributions. So today, I will try to answer and justify this query for my audiences.

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Sparky 4.13

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Debian

There is an update of Sparky oldstable 4.13 code name “Tyche” out there. It is based on the Debian oldstable “Stretch”.

Changes:
• system upgrade from Debian oldstable “Stretch” repos as of October 2, 2020
• Calamares doesn’t refresh package list to avoid breaking installation if Debian or Sparky repo is off
• Sparky repos changed from ‘oldstable’ to named ‘tyche’; make sure you use right Sparky repositories
• Linux kernel upgraded up to 4.9.228-1
• Firefox 78.3.0esr
• Thunderbird 68.12.0
• LibreOffice 4.3.3

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Debian: Sparky Linux, Mailman vs DKIM and Some Reports

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Debian

  • Sparky news 2020/09

    The 9th monthly Sparky project and donate report of 2020:

    • Linux kernel updated up to version 5.8.12 & 5.9-rc5
    • added to repos: Browsh, Ciano, Brackets, Cherrytree
    • Sparky 2020.09 of the rolling line released

  •  

  • Ian Jackson: Mailman vs DKIM - a novel solution

    Do not configure Mailman to replace the mail domains in From: headers. Instead, try out my small new program which can make your Mailman transparent, so that DKIM signatures survive.

    [...]

    DKIM is a new anti-spoofing mechanism for Internet email, intended to help fight spam. DKIM, paired with the DMARC policy system, has been remarkably successful at stemming the flood of joe-job spams. As usually deployed, DKIM works like this:

    When a message is originally sent, the author's MUA sends it to the MTA for their From: domain for outward delivery. The From: domain mailserver calculates a cryptographic signature of the message, and puts the signature in the headers of the message.

    Obviously not the whole message can be signed, since at the very least additional headers need to be added in transit, and sometimes headers need to be modified too. The signing MTA gets to decide what parts of the message are covered by the signature: they nominate the header fields that are covered by the signature, and specify how to handle the body.

    A recipient MTA looks up the public key for the From: domain in the DNS, and checks the signature. If the signature doesn't match, depending on policy (originator's policy, in the DNS, and recipient's policy of course), typically the message will be treated as spam.

  •  

  • Sylvain Beucler: Debian LTS and ELTS - September 2020

    Here is my transparent report for my work on the Debian Long Term Support (LTS) and Debian Extended Long Term Support (ELTS), which extend the security support for past Debian releases, as a paid contributor.

    In September, the monthly sponsored hours were split evenly among contributors depending on their max availability - I was assigned 19.75h for LTS (out of my 30 max; all done) and 20h for ELTS (out of my 20 max; all done).

  •  

  • Molly de Blanc: Free Software Activities – September 2020

    I’m attempting to step down from the Outreach team, which is more work than I thought it would be. I had a very complicated relationship with the Outreach team. When no one else was there to take on making sure we did GSoC and Outreachy, I stepped up. It wasn’t really what I wanted to be doing, but it’s important. I’m glad to have more time to focus on other things that feel more aligned with what I’m trying to work on right now.

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Con Kolivas Releases Linux 5.9-ck1 (MuQSS)

      
  • -ck hacking: linux-5.9-ck1, MuQSS version 0.204 for linux-5.9

    Unfortunately these past few months have been marred by lockdown and family issues, culminating in the ultimate death of my father just over a month ago (unrelated to covid19 but made that much worse because of its effects on everything in our city) so linux kernel was the furthest thing from my mind and a 5.8 resync never happened. He'll be sorely missed, and if this were something more substantial I'd dedicate it towards him but it doesn't do him justice. Announcing a new -ck release, 5.9-ck1  with the latest version of the Multiple Queue Skiplist Scheduler, version 0.204 These are patches designed to improve system responsiveness and interactivity with specific emphasis on the desktop, but configurable for any workload. 

  • Linux 5.9-ck1 Released With Updated MuQSS - Phoronix

    Independent Linux kernel developer Con Kolivas (and retired anaesthetist) is back on track with a new update to his "CK" patch-set and the MuQSS scheduler.  The retired doctor had taken some time off from his kernel development hobby earlier this year to help design equipment for the COVID-19 battle. He did manage to release his updated patches for Linux 5.7 but has been becoming increasingly concerned over the size of the Linux kernel and his ability in the future to continue maintaining these independent patches as a result. Making the matters worse, his father passed away (non-COVID) and that further complicated his development work. 

Change CPU Governor And Frequencies On Linux With cpupower-gui (New Release)

cpupower-gui is a tool that makes it easy to change the CPU governor as well as the CPU frequency limits on Linux. [...] This Python3 + Gtk3 application was updated to version 0.9.0 (followed by 0.9.1 to fix a few bugs) recently with new features, like the ability to use custom CPU profiles for quickly switching the settings. You can switch between the 2 pre-built profiles, Balanced and Performance, from the cpupower-gui user interface, but you can't change them or create a new profile from there. Read more

Ubuntu Vs Pop!_OS: Which One’s Better?

Both Ubuntu and Pop!OS is great for beginners as well as professionals. Like how the budget Android devices ship with a lot of bloatware, Ubuntu also ships with bloatware, resulting in a relatively poor user experience and performance compared to Pop!_OS. Ubuntu also comes with “Ubuntu Minimal options” that don’t include many applications letting you install what you actually need. Apart from that, Ubuntu’s software center has a built-in section for snap applications, whereas you won’t find snap packages in the Pop!_OS shop rather you’ll find the Flatpak package option. However, Snap packages take too much space on the disk; hence, we suggest you consider using the APT version of any application. Pop!_OS also has its own official PPA, where you can find applications like TensorFlow and Android Studio one “apt-get install” away from installing. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: bpytop, Linux in the Ham Shack and Full Circle Weekly News

  • Awesome Linux Tools: bpytop - YouTube

    I found another awesome Linux tool! This time, it's bpytop, a really neat utility that's similar to htop and allows you to monitor the system resources on your Linux workstation or server. In this video, I'll show you how to install it, and you'll see it in action!

  • LHS Episode #373: GridTracker Deep Dive Part 3 | Linux in the Ham Shack

    Welcome to Episode 373 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, we have a roundtable discussion with several of the contributors to the GridTracker.org project. We explore all the changes in GT from Part 2 through the recording date and also look at the new direction of GridTracker as an organization. GT is expanding in mentoring, STEM education, community and much more. Thank you for listening and have a great week.

  • Full Circle Weekly News #186 | Full Circle Magazine

    Linux GUI Apps Coming to Windows https://www.zdnet.com/article/linux-graphical-apps-coming-to-windows-subsystem-for-linux/ Linux Mint 20.1 Will Arrive Mid-December https://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=3969 Ubuntu 20.10, Groovy Gorilla [beta], Out https://9to5linux.com/ubuntu-20-10-beta-is-now-available-for-download Fedora 33 Beta Out https://fedoramagazine.org/announcing-the-release-of-fedora-33-beta/ KaOS 2020.09 Out https://kaosx.us/news/2020/kaos09/ Tails 4.11 Out https://tails.boum.org/news/version_4.11/index.en.html Nitrux 1.3.3 Out https://nxos.org/changelog/changelog-nitrux-1-3-3/ Firefox 81.0.1 Out https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/81.0.1/releasenotes/ Calibre 5.0 Out https://calibre-ebook.com/new-in/fourteen